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"Philadelphia, PA"

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's understanding of viewing Christ in relation to God's character.

Letter from Joan Daves Requesting the Table of Contents for "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, December 19, 1966

Here Joan Daves requests a table of contents for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here" in order to write a description for the catalog.

Dr. King's Speech in Front of U.N. April 15, 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament biblical book of Deuteronomy expressing that there is only one God.

Birthday Card from Isaac Stotts to MLK

Isaac Stotts sends birthday wishes to Dr. King on his 39th birthday.

Vote of Confidence for Negro Leader

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

In this editorial, a study of 300 negro in 13 cities, was conducted to determine the public attitude towards Dr. King.

Letter from Jay Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 24, 1964

Jay Richard Kennedy congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He also comments on the importance of international recognition for the current struggle for equality.

Postcard Congratulating MLK for Receiving the Nobel Prize

Louise Dekker-Brus congratulates Dr. King on the Nobel Peace Prize and writes that their newspaper says that, in King, America has its Joan of Arc.

Letter to the Federal Housing Commissioner from MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

This document is a Federal Housing Administration application from Dr. King concerning one of his many housing programs.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

Monday, February 10, 1958

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

Letter from Daniel Tyler to MLK

Monday, February 15, 1965

Author Daniel Tyler discusses the contributions he has submitted to the National Baptist Convention. He requests that Dr. King send him information on how to assist the cause of voter registration.

Faith In The Heart

Dr. King uses the steadfast faith of biblical figures Abraham and Paul to express his desire to part from the traditionalism of religion and make it applicable to all aspects of a person's life. King also iterates this position by using excerpts from various philosophers such as Edgar Brightman and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, January 13, 1964

Joan Daves writes Dr. King regarding an incomplete document that he signed for the "English tax people." For his convenience, she encloses a pre-written letter to send to England once the document is officially completed.

Bayard Rustin: Goals and Strategies

Thursday, August 20, 1964

In this speech, given before Bowdoin College in 1964, Bayard Rustin outlines the basis of civil rights issues currently being fought for. He argues that man must come together as one and face the problem with our society, and that African Americans see the problems with society more than other races because they are struggling to bring civil rights and social change to all.

Letter from Clayton Yates to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Clayton R. Yates informs Dr. King of the Kappa Boule Meeting held on Morehouse College campus with James P. Brawley and Benjamin E. Mays.

Letter from Missouri Prisoner Melvin Shepard to MLK

Melvin Shepard, a prisoner in the Missouri State Penitentiary, requests that Dr. King respond to his earlier letters. Shepard explains that Dr. King can help by sending "some young lawyers."

True Democracy

Reverend O. J. P. Wetklo explains his ideas of true democracy, which he gives a Christian foundation and compares to the natural world. He calls true democracy "a perfect brotherhood of man," and he argues that each individual member of society must take responsibility for the whole.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Telegram from Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, July 29, 1965

SCLC Vice President-At-Large, Ralph D. Abernathy, grants permission for the release of information to Jesse B. Blayton. Mr. Blayton was Georgia's first black Certified Public Accountant.

Support Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

New York Governor, Nelson A. Rockefeller, and Happy [Rockefeller] had the opportunity to spend time with Dr. King and his family after the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremonies. Admist the renewal of personal attacks against Dr. King, Nelson Rockefeller offers his support and encouragement.

Exam for Bible 252 at Morehouse

This is an exam for Dr. King's Bible course, which lasted from September 1946 to May 1947, at Morehouse College. Dr. George D. Kelsey was the professor. Dr. King's notes are in the margins.

Letter from L. H. Stibbards to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965

Mr. Stibbards sends a donation and words of encouragement from the McMaster Divinity Student's Association. He assures Dr. King that their members are at Dr. King's service.

News Release: $30 Billion Omnibus Bill for Jobs, Education and Housing Presented to SCLC Convention

Friday, August 18, 1967

This press release is an overview of Congressman John Conyers, Jr.'s "Full Opportunity Act of 1967."

Outline for The Secret of Adjustment

In this sermon, Dr. King notes applicable methods used to deal with the tensions in life. It is said that "the secret to adjustment is to find contentment." King further references the experience of the Apostle Paul and what he learned in confronting this problem.

Letter from WSB-TV's Don Elliot Heald to MLK

Friday, December 29, 1967

Don Elliot, of WSB Television in Atlanta, encloses an editorial for Dr. King to review. In the editorial, American Baptist Convention President J. H. Jackson criticizes Dr. King for not taking a more constructive approach towards influencing Congress to pass more civil rights legislation.

A Knock at Midnight

Dr. King wrote this sermon for the Youth Sunday Services of the Women's Convention Auxiliary National Baptist Convention in Chicago on September 14, 1958. The sermon builds off of a biblical passage from Luke in which a friend visits a neighbor at midnight for three loaves of bread. Correlating the story to the modern world, Dr.

Report of the Insurgent Editor's Conference

These minutes of the "Insurgent Newspaper Editor's Conference" record the events of the conference from start to finish. The minutes also describe prominent topics of the conference, including the difficulties publishing an insurgent newspaper on a tight budget, reaching a large audience, and generating powerful content. The minutes end on a positive note: "a good time was had by all."

Letter from MLK to Stewart Udall

Thursday, February 22, 1962

On behalf of the SCLC and affiliated organizations, Dr. King requests permission from Stewart Udall, United States Secretary of the Interior, to use the Lincoln Memorial for a Service of Dedication to celebrate the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

God

Dr. King explores the topic of God and quotes the classical scholar Gilbert Murray.

Unity

These notes, prepared by Dr. King, were for a sermon entitled "Unity." This sermon, believed to be composed during the time of 1948-1954, was never delivered.