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"Philadelphia, PA"

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.

Letter from MLK to US Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall

Friday, March 23, 1962

Dr. King writes Stewart Udall, US Secretary of Interior, to thank him permitting the use of the Lincoln Memorial for the 100th Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The event would come to be known as "The March on Washington," site of Dr. King's most famous speech.

Sabellianism

Dr. King defines "Sabellianism" as the concept of acknowledging God as one entity with three modes.

Letter from MLK to the Erie, Pennsylvania NAACP

Friday, March 30, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from Erie Branch of the NAACP.

SNCC Annual Conference Program 1960

Sunday, October 16, 1960

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee concludes their annual conference with a rally featuring prominent student leaders. This program outlines the itinerary for the last event of the three day conference and includes SNCC's Statement of Purpose.

American Influence in Vietnam

Dr. John C. Bennett, President of the Union Theological Seminary, expresses his political beliefs concerning the presence of American military in Vietnam.

Letter from A. K. Magugu to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

The Office of Kenya National Celebrations congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. In addition, the author encloses an invitation card in hopes that the Reverend may attend their Anniversary and Republic Day Celebrations.

Resolution from the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference

Monday, April 8, 1968

This resolution, adopted by the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference, condemns the brutal assassination of Dr. King.

Memorandum from Jacob Seidenberg to Participants

Monday, May 11, 1959

Jacob Seidenberg, the Executive Director of the President's Committee on Government Contracts, provides details on the agenda to the participants in the Religious Leaders Conference. Dr. King was one of those participants.

Schleiermacher (Elements of Pantheism)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion” and writes that it reminds him of Spinoza’s intellectual love of God. The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Ann Pagenstecher to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Ann Pagenstecher from Harvard College Library offers Dr. King a copy of a bibliography that lists publications, both, by and about him. She shares supportive words with Dr. King, applauding his crusade regardless of the outcome. The attached bibliography contains a brief biography of Dr. King's life and seven pages of literature including books and articles from prominent publications such as Ebony Magazine, The New York Times, and The Christian Century.

Letter from Mrs. Everett L. Brantley to the SCLC

Friday, June 11, 1965

Mrs. Brantley asks that the SCLC forward an enclosed check for Mrs. Reeb, funded by money raised at a citizens meeting in New Jersey.

City Wide Freedom Rally Featuring MLK

Friday, March 20, 1964

This 1964 program from a rally in Canton, Ohio, features Dr. King as speaker.

Letter from MLK to Ralph McGill

Thursday, May 11, 1967

Dr. King writes to Ralph McGill of the Atlanta Constitution to clarify his position on the Vietnam War. Dr. King considers his objection to the war to be a matter of conscience, and not one of political expediency.

Response from MLK to Priscilla C. Spagne

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Priscilla C. Spagne for her supportive letter to the Boston Globe. He proclaims that it is important to, "Take every opportunity to make our consciences known to the public."

Letter from William L. Harris to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968

William Harris, vice-chairman of the Extra Legal Forum at the Law School of the University of Virginia, invites Dr. King to speak at a Forum event.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK Regarding Paul Chapman

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in reference to a previous telgram correspondence concerning an assault on Reverend Paul Chapman. Burke writes that his department can take no action due to a lack of evidence indicating a crime.

SCLC Seventh Annual Convention Brochure

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

This document is a program from the SCLC's Seventh Annual Convention in Richmond, Virginia. The event was hosted by Curtis Harris, president of the Virginia unit of the SCLC.

Rural Negros Start New Program

This press release from the SCLC informs the public that the self-help program of education for seasonal farm workers in Wilcox County, Alabama has officially opened. Along with the help of the federal office of Economic Opportunity, the SCLC wishes to create hope for neglected rural families. Also, to make this program a success, the antipoverty agency funded about $250 as well as a federal grant of $300 to help in financing this project.

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.

Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Jeremiah 3:12.

Letter from "A Southerner" to MLK

This letter, signed by, "A Southerner", suggests that Dr. King persuade Black people to return to Africa.

Letter from Dan Aldridge to MLK

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dan A. Aldridge, President of the Foundation Life Insurance Company, recalls a previous visit to Dr. King's home. Aldridge requests an appointment with Dr. King to discuss several important business matters.

Methodology, Tests of Truth

Dr. King discusses Henry Nelson Wieman's test of truth in religion described in "The Source of Human Good."

History

Dr. King references a quote from philosopher Hegel regarding the philosophy of history.

Letter from John Harrigan Jr. to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967

John Harrigan, Jr. describes his education and work experience to Dr. King, and explains his desire to transition to the social revolutionary movement. He offers his services to Dr. King, stating his reimbursement requirements. He ends his letter by outlining a four step process to solve poverty in the United States.