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Black Marches and White Hysteria

Monday, August 15, 1966

This editorial by WBBM-TV in Chicago, a CBS station, highlights recent civil rights marches and the corresponding white hysteria. Carter Davidson, editorial director, discusses the marches and the middle-class citizens who displayed Nazi swastikas in response.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Monday, May 18, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the German publishers and their inquiry about a special introduction for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait." Joan Daves also asked for Dr. King's opinion about whether the press conference should be in Berlin or elsewhere.

Miracle

Dr. King references the Old Testament Biblical Book of Numbers regarding the topic of miracles.

Letter from Carol Thomas to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Carol Thomas writes Dr. King to inform him that she is making a donation to help with the war on poverty. Enclosed with the letter is a $125.00 check. She also explains that she received one of King's books in the mail. Ms. Thomas further inquires of the purchasing and mailing information of books made to the public.

Correspondence - Mrs. King from The Alumni Association of Antioch College/ Alumni Fund 4/26/60

Tuesday, April 26, 1960

This 1960 fundraising letter is from the Alumni Association of Mrs. King's alma mater, Antioch College. The fundraising committee for the Alumni Association sent this appeal to Mrs. King as a request for her continued support.

Letter from Bryn Mawr College to MLK

Monday, May 30, 1966

Bryn Mawr College commends Dr. King for his recent "forceful" presentation that impressed those in attendance at the institution.

Letter from Rayphil Clark to MLK

Wednesday, September 29, 1965

Michigan inmate Rayphil Clark urges Dr. King to assist him with receiving fair treatment during his incarceration. Clark lists multiple situations where Negro employees and inmates are intimidated by white prison officials. Most importantly, Clark feels that he is constantly being singled out and subjected to horrible treatment. According to Clark's description of prison officials, "they are more concerned with racial vengenaude then they are re-habiliation."

SCLC Proposal for Recruiting "Grass Root" Delegates

Monday, June 12, 1967

This document contains a proposal for recruiting 1,745 "grass root" delegates to the SCLC's 1967 Annual Convention. Also included is a desired amount of delegates from southern states, a proposed list of meeting places, and a budget for recruiting the delegates.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Ossie Davis to MLK Regarding Malcolm X Assassination

Friday, October 1, 1965

In this letter, Ossie Davis asserts to Dr. King that it is true that there is one law for whites and another for blacks. Ossie continues by expressing his feelings on Malcolm X's assassination. He closes his letter by asking for Dr. King's signature and monetary donation for an ad.

Letter from E. Z. Graves to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

E. Z. Graves adversely compares Dr. King, Stokely Carmicheal and Adam Clayton Powell to manure. Mr. Graves attaches an article entitled, "King and Carmicheal Maps Strategy for Summer Attacks on Big Cities."

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

Maryland Congressman Charles M. Mathias thanks Dr. King for his letter regarding the Representative's recent trip to Selma, Alabama. As a result of his visit, Congressman Mathias informs Dr. King that he prepared and introduced civil rights legislation to the latest House of Representatives session.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

Letter from James Bevel on the Spring Mobilization Committee

James Bevel, national director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, offers insight into the purpose of the committee. The committee focuses on launching two mass demonstrations to stop the war, with the goal of "seeking to stimulate increased activity everywhere."

MLK Writes on Miracles

Dr. King outlines Dr. James Moffatt's views on students understanding of new testament.

Man the Sinner

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Recommendation from Laplois Ashford

Friday, March 17, 1967

The Executive Director of the Urban League of Rochester writes this letter of recommendation to the President of United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers on behalf of Bernice Turner.

Reverend Walter E. Fauntroy's Keynote Address to the SCLC

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Reverend Walter E. Fauntroy's keynote address to the SCLC informs his listeners of the trials and the triumphs of African-Americans in the US. Fauntroy focuses primarily on the subject nonviolence and provides his listeners with a summary of the progress that blacks have made since the start of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Yolanda Riverra to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Yolanda Riverra, a student, writes to Mrs. King expressing sympathy for Dr. King's assassination.

Aid Victims of South Africa's Racism

Members of the American Committee on Africa solicit funding for the support and advancement of victims of Apartheid in South Africa. This brochure highlights the unjust treatment of black South Africans through individual testimonies.

Letter from Jimmie Johnson to MLK

Jimmie Johnson writes to Dr. King to say that while he is a Negro, he does not believe in integration. Johnson does not think there will ever be enough jobs in America for Negroes, and therefore argues for segregation. He asks Dr. King to share this view in his upcoming meeting with President Johnson.

Letter from Richard Boone to Barbara Hicks

Friday, July 2, 1965

Rev. Boone encloses some adverse literature to be distributed to Dr. King and others.

Letter from Harper & Brothers to MLK

Friday, October 10, 1958

Eugene Exman sends Dr. King a review of "Stride Toward Freedom" from the New York Times. He also mentions recent orders for the book and planned efforts to increase sales.

10th Annual SCLC Convention Program

This document is a flyer for the 10th annual convention of the SCLC.

Letter to MLK from Rose Spann

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Rosa Spann of West Kinney Jr. High School, expresses her appreciation to Dr. King by writing a poem called "The Undergrounders."

Annual Report of The President: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

In the SCLC's Annual Presidential Report, Dr. King chronicles a decade of organization's activities to eliminate segregation. The report was delivered at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC.

Some Information About Black Africa Culture

This document discusses various discoveries that have been made about African civilizations and their cultures.

Letter from Anonymous Critic to MLK

A critic sends Dr. King a series of newspaper clippings in order to communicate an adverse view about "negro people." The author brings special attention to an enclosed article about Stokely Carmichael and asks for his view. After accusing Dr. King of receiving money from the Communist Party, the writer states "I will never know why you was given the noble award."

Letter from Harold Eggers to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

In this letter Harold Eggers, a White supremacist, criticizes the African American race, for what Eggers perceives as an inability to recognize "real leadership ability." However, he does this while commending Dr. King for possessing "real leadership ability."

Letter from Rev. A. A. Ackerman to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1962

Reverend A. A. Ackerman, Pastor of Bethel AME Church, writes Dr. King in hopes that he can make an appearance and speak at his church.