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"Philadelphia, PA"

SCLC Form Letters

The first letter states that Dr. King is out of the city for a few days. The second letter expresses gratitude for the recipient's moral support and Christian generosity.

Notecard- Collective Egotism

In this notecard, Dr. King is outlining Nicbuhr's view of collective egotism.

Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding

This document provides a detail description of Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding, a candidate for the Democratic primary in the 53rd assembly district.

Letter from Susan Agrest to MLK

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

Susan Agrest of Harcourt, Brace & World, Inc. requests Dr. King's permission to reprint "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in a book that will be published.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Thursday, June 30, 1966

This royalty statement from Harper and Row, Publishers Incorporated, details royalty earnings for Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" for the six month period ending June 30, 1966.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964

Clarence Jones writes Dr. King requesting commentary concerning "The World March Towards Human Rights: Luncheon on May 28, 1964."

Notes on Generational Questions

The document, shown here, was briefly handwritten by Dr. King. Some of the writing in the document says, "One of the most important questions raised in any generation is the question.........." The remaining content of the document is unwritten.

Letter from MLK to A.S. Grant

Dr. King thanks Elder Grant for the kind remarks from his previous letter and lets him know that due to the business of his schedule as the President of the SCLC, he is unable to devote attention to Grant's proposal.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to John H. Bustamente

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Chauncey Eskridge elaborates on the financial details associated with the Belafonte Benefit Concerts. He also requests some help in overcoming the deficit created by the concert.

Letter from Malsenia Armstrong to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Miss Malsenia Armstrong writes to Dr. King requesting help with a "Legislative Action Project" pertaining to Southern Displaced Teachers.

Telegram from Governor Edmund Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Governor Brown writes to Dr. King protesting the brutal treatment of Negro citizens in Selma, Alabama.

Housing Report to the SCLC Board of Directors

Members of the SCLC Board of Directors were the recipients of this detailed report outlining solutions to end the slum crisis in the North.

MLK's Notes On the Influence of Radio

Dr. King records information regarding religious broadcasting. He list percentages of public influence, prize giveaways and other relevant historical details.

Letter from MLK to John Frink

Friday, January 5, 1968

In this letter, dated January 5, 1968, Dr. King writes to John A. Frink expressing his gratitude for his contribution to the S.C.L.C.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, June 11, 1963

Dr. King writes to President John F. Kennedy about the President's speech to the nation. Dr. King writes that he found the speech to be most eloquent and unequivocal.

Definitions

Dr. King defines a set of words such as, "Gospel" and "Justification."

Telegram from John Conyers Jr. to MLK about a Meeting

In this telegram John Conyers, Jr. extends an invitation to Dr. King to attend a meeting for the discussion of black politics and related considerations. The meeting was to include Lerone Bennett, Julian Bond, Harry Belfonte, Richard Hatcher, Floyd McKissick, and Carl Stokes. Conyers also informs Dr. King of his itinerary and provides a number for him to be contacted.

Let's Save Virginia Seminary

Tuesday, September 19, 1961

Reverend Virgil A. Wood implores his church, other churches and friends in the constituency of Virginia Seminary to not only continue their support, but to double it if possible.

American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief

Monday, December 4, 1967

The American Clergymen's Committee for Vietnamese War Relief requests that Dr. King join them in sending medical supplies to North Vietnam. They also explain the difficulties they are receiving from the government to obtain a Treasury Department License which would enable them to assist in the war relief. Lastly, the committee informs Dr. King of how other churches have made generous contributions to help with relief for the Vietnam War.

Letter from C. Elden to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

C. Elden urges Dr. King to speak with Cassius Clay, who later changed his name to Muhammad Ali, about his refusal to be drafted into the military. Elden believes that Dr. King's influence will change Clay's mind and make Clay realize that citizens "must fight."

Letter from Byron F. Mische to the Members of Congress Regarding Vietnam

Monday, March 20, 1967

In this letter to the members of Congress, Byron E. Mische took the initiative to combine letters sent to government officials, editors of publications and congressmen regarding Vietnam. This letter was copied to Dr. King.

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Judy Richardson

Mrs. King expresses her support for the SNCC's Negro History Primer program. She also provides Miss Richardson with her contact information so that a later meeting can be arranged.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

Tuesday, October 16, 1956

In this early speech to a NY Universalists' convention, Dr. King lays out his nonviolence method, based on Gandhi's. He outlines five of the six principles he will use later. They are: active, courageous resistance; winning the moral conversion of the opponent, not defeating him; attacking the forces of evil, rather than the persons doing evil; using love to avoid "internal violence of the spirit"; and faith in the inclination of the universe towards justice.

Power

Dr. King cites Karen Horney's "The Neurotic Personality of Our Time.

Letter from Mount Olive Baptist Church to the SCLC

Saturday, October 5, 1963

The Mount Olive Baptist Church of Sharpsburg express their appreciation and support of the SCLC's nonviolent movement. The church encloses a check and hopes that the organization will maintain clarity in the progression of a "true democracy."

Draft of Prayer Given by Dr. King

This document is a handwritten draft of a prayer, given by Dr. King. The prayer thanked God for "gifts of mind with which thou hast endowed us." The date and place, in which this prayer was given, is unknown.

God

Dr. King notes that Samuel Alexander does not see God as creator but creature.

Letter from MLK to Joyce Armstrong

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to Joyce Armstrong, a student at Central High School, regarding her concerns on equality. Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation and states, "it is gratifying to us to know that so many young people are dedicated to the cause of Freedom."