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"Philadelphia, PA"

Bob Fitch Passes Letter to MLK Through Secretary McDonald

Bob Fitch makes mention of a letter that he feels would be of interest to Dr. King.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Philadelphia, PA

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

I Wish...

Dr. King writes a nursery rhyme on wishes.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Contracts

Friday, January 29, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, INDIA

In this letter Joan Daves requests from Ms. McDonald the required signatures from Dr. King for the contract for the Oriya-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait," which is to be published in India.

Telegram from Dr. King to Senator Ernest Gruening

Washington, D.C.

In this telegram to Senator Ernest Gruening, Dr. King expressed his happiness to serve as sponsor of a peace concert of the Arts that was held at Lincoln Center, January 21, 1968.

Letter from William A. Geoghegan to MLK

Wednesday, March 10, 1965
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

William A. Geoghegan, US Department of Justice Assistant Deputy Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram recommending L. N. D. Wells, Jr. to the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Letter from Marlyn Roach to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Marlyn Roach requests an interview in hopes of a job with SCLC, as she is disillusioned with the antipoverty programs on which she has been working. She cites the cause of the "total failure" of the program to be the difference between the Negroes' and the state and federal government's objectives.

Telegram from Wyatt Tee Walker

Saturday, July 28, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Walker sends out this telegram to inform its recipients that Dr. King and Rev. Abernathy have been unjustly arrested in Albany, Georgia.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King cross-references fundamentalism with authoritarianism.

Letter from Anna Mull Jones to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Indiana (IN)

Anna M. Jones informs Dr. King that she will pray for him while he is in jail, but she also requests that he read the history of the United States and reread the Constitution. She asserts that the Republican Party was created for the express purpose of halting the spread of slavery.

Letter from Marian R. Johnson to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Missouri (MO), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Johnson expresses her concern regarding the potential threats to undermine Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Christian Action to MLK

Monday, April 20, 1964
London, England, SOUTH AFRICA

L. John Collins, Chairman of Christian Action, writes Dr. King inquiring if he would be interested in attending a public meeting in London regarding race relations in South Africa. In addition to Dr. King, one of the prospective speakers mentioned was James Baldwin.

Letter from Michael George to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1968

Mr. George expresses his views on Dr. King's response to the riots Dr. King assisted in ending.

Letter from Asher Feren to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966
Chicago, IL

Asher Feren writes to Dr. King to express his concerns for the Hyde Park High School Unity Plan.

Letter from C. L. Evans to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967
Richmond, VA

C. L. Evans is giving a $100 contribution on behalf of the Baptist Allied Headquarters, to Dr. King for his work and organization.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
GREECE, GERMANY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, KENYA

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Letter from Nancy Childs to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Detroit, MI

Nancy Childs, a junior in high school, writes Dr. King to convey support in the fight for equality and civil rights in America. Childs is a student at an integrated high school in Detroit, Michigan and expresses her delight that Dr. King has the ability to stand up for his beliefs. This letter was drafted following the bloody assault against demonstrators during the first attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery on March 7, 1965.

Letter from Isaac Franck to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963
Washington, D.C., Richmond, VA

Issac Franck extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at Adas Israel. Adas Israel is the largest Conservative Congregation in the Greater Washington area.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter White

Friday, September 10, 1965
London, England, CANADA

Dora McDonald notifies Peter White, of the University of Western Ontario, that Dr. King is unable to accept any additional speaking engagements for the "next seven or eight months."

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, June 11, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to President John F. Kennedy about the President's speech to the nation. Dr. King writes that he found the speech to be most eloquent and unequivocal.

Letter of invitation from Rabbi Albert A. Goldman to MLK

Thursday, May 20, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Goldman invites Dr. King to be the guest speaker for the Community Thanksgiving Service at The Isaac M. Wise temple in Ohio.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi S. Burr Yampol

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Rabbi Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, for sending a copy of his organization's resolution.

Letter from David W. Letts to the S.C.L.C.

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
Cleveland, OH

This letter, coupled with a donation, was sent from Baldwin-Wallace College to the S.C.L.C following Dr. King's assassination. The writer discusses the initiation of student activism that was taking place at the college in response to Dr. King's tragic death.

Letter from MLK to Halvey Simmons

Friday, October 19, 1962
New York, NY

Dr. King writes Halvey Simmons expressing thanks for his interest and concern regarding the burning of several churches in Atlanta, Georgia. He continues by stating the intent to rebuild the churches with funding created by the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Letter from Rene Golcochen to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

Rene Golcochen offers condolences to Mrs. King following the death of Dr. King.

Abelard

Dr. King quotes 12th century French philosopher Peter Abelard on the relationship between doubt, inquiry and truth.

Letter from MLK to Nelson Rockefeller

Wednesday, August 22, 1962
New York (NY)

Dr. King takes the opportunity to thank New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller for his tremendous contribution to SCLC. He expresses that the struggle couldn't have survived without friends like Gov. Rockefeller and looks forward to their September 7, 1962 meeting.

Letter from MLK to Juanita Epps

Friday, July 9, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Juanita Epps and the members of the People's Community Church of Queens for their generous donation to SCLC. As Dr. King replies, "Your encouragement is an inspiration to me and all who are committed to the struggle for human rights and dignity."

Foreward by MLK: Famous Negro American Series

Dr. King discusses the contributions of Negro Americans to American society, past and present, in this foreward for the publication: Famous Negro American Series.

SCLC SCOPE Pamphlet

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

This pamphlet is a product of the Summer Community Organization and Political Education project (SCOPE), a project initiated by the SCLC dedicated to increasing voter participation and political education in Alabama and throughout the South. The pamphlet highlights several common economic and political issues that face Negro communities.