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Letter from MLK to Ruby Brown

Monday, April 4, 1966
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Ruby Brown of Detroit, Michigan to thank her for her letter regarding the civil rights struggle.

Letter from Mel Koch to MLK

Monday, August 20, 1956
Berkeley, CA, Montgomery, AL

Mel Koch responds to Dr. King's request about purchasing Volkswagen Microbuses for the Montgomery Improvement Association. Koch includes reasons as to why he opposes the idea and cannot recommend the vehicles for King's purposes.

Letter from Dorothy O. Bucklin to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Wisconsin (WI), Pennsylvania (PA)

Mrs. Bucklin invites Dr. King to deliver a series of sermons highlighting his biblical preference and his experiences with the SCLC. The conference will host affiliates of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies.

Telegram from the Church of Sweden to MLK

Tuesday, March 3, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden

The Church of Sweden invites Dr. King to take part in a great church event in the fall of 1964. The church assures Dr. King that all expenses will be paid for his travel and the archbishop of Sweden will provide him with the official invitation letter.

Facing Life's Inescapables

Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King uses an allegory regarding life to express that if an individual follows God's plan they will live an abundantly happy life.

City's Leaders Plan Dinner for MLK

Wednesday, January 6, 1965
Atlanta, GA

This article announces a banquet to be held to honor Dr. King for his Nobel Peace Prize award. The banquet is hosted by various leaders in the City of Atlanta.

Letter from Librarian Olive Ann Tamborelle to MLK

Tuesday, October 26, 1965
New Jersey (NJ)

Olive Ann Tamborelle, Director of the Teaneck Public Library, asks Dr. King to name the book that has had the greatest effect on his life, other than The Bible. She informs him that the information will be used in an exhibit for National Library Week.

Six Lessons from Red China

Wednesday, August 1, 1951

The author discusses six lessons that readers can learn from Communist China concerning America and the church. The first lesson being on corruption, if uncontrolled, leads to tyranny. The second and third lessons focus on change. The forces in the world during that time (namely Communism) and the methods they used exceeded what people thought was possible in history.

Letter to MLK from Carolina Smith

Monday, August 21, 1967

The author negatively expresses ideas to Dr. King, in his actions towards the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Arthur Stanley

Tuesday, December 26, 1967
Indiana (IN), Chicago, IL

Dr. King thanks Arthur Stanley for raising funds to defray the salary expenses for David Wallace. He also expresses delight that Mr. Stanley will be attending the Operation Breadbasket meeting.

Ebenezer Baptist Church Apartment Complex

Wednesday, September 13, 1967
North Carolina (NC)

Ralph D. Abernathy informs Mr. J. Lafayette Morgan that he is unable to supply the information Mr. Morgan requested.

Letter from Carmen Rivera to Mrs. King 4/5/68

New York, NY

Carmen Rivera, a young girl from NYC, writes to Mrs. King to offer her condolences after the assasination of Dr. King.


Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's statement that there is no "medium point" as it relates to God.

Schleiermacher & Ritschl

Dr. King writes notes regarding the philosophies of German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl. King states there is a mixture of attraction and repulsion between the two, as Ritschl is repelled by Schleiermacher's mysticism and attracted to his views on Christianity.

Letter from Reverend Roland de Corneille to Wyatt Walker

Friday, December 6, 1963

Reverend Roland de Corneille writes to Wyatt T. Walker regarding a fundraiser for the SCLC. Reverend de Corneille would like for Dr. King and a notable celebrity, such as Harry Belafonte or Nat King Cole, to come to Toronto, Canada for a benefit show.

Anti-Poverty Expenditures that Cheat Federal Taxpayers and the Poor


Harry G. and Elizabeth R. Brown express their concerns about housing in America. They claim that while open housing will help Negroes who can afford it, those who cannot will continue to live in slums. They pose the idea of reforming the tax policy as a solution to this problem.

Letter from Harry Boyte to Celia Howard Casey

Tuesday, August 13, 1963
New York (NY)

Harry Boyte writes Celia Casey, on behalf of Dr. King, to express appreciation for her letter.

Letter from Marie Brookter to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
Chicago, IL, New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Marie Brookter offers Dr. King "information as to the needs of the Poor" in preparation for the upcoming March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from Henry Gonzalez to MLK

Tuesday, June 28, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Representative Henry Gonzalez, a democratic politician representing Texas, responds to a request letter for donations from the SCLC. While he encloses a check, he criticizes the fact that the NAACP was excluded from the Mississippi March.

"Poverty Scene"

Wednesday, June 29, 1966
California (CA), INDONESIA

This newspaper clipping features a young Jakarta girl, as the face of poverty, in Indonesia.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Wednesday, May 12, 1965

The Program Committee of the World Convention of Churches of Christ requests Dr. King for the delivery of a major address at the Seventh Assembly in Puerto Rico. Laurence V. Kirkpatrick, the acting general secretary and friend of Reverend Andrew Young, contacts Dr. King to inquire about the status of the original invitation because the organization has yet to receive a response.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Stoug

Dr. King writes Mrs. Stoug thanking her for sending a copy of the play, "Listen America." He also offers advice on how to market her play and expresses his appreciation for her support for the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Thursday, July 5, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS), ALGERIA

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.


Dr. King outlines historical information regarding the Anabaptists and the religious philosophy of the group.

Telegram from Mrs. King on Meaning of Christmas

Thursday, December 19, 1968

Mrs. King expresses sadness that the United States is launching a new dimension in its space program, but spends so little on eliminating poverty, hunger, disease, war and racism.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI

This postcard refers to 5 men arrested for exhibiting "black power."

MLK at a Communist Training School

Tennessee (TN), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

This document depicts prominent civil rights and political leaders allegedly at a communist training school. This anti-King document asks the question, "what kind of American are you?"

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Virginia (VA)

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

Telegram from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King offers words of encouragement to Adam Clayton Powell during the loss of his seat and chairmanship in Congress.

Letter from Benjamin Conklin to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Conklin writes this letter urging Rev. Abernathy to rethink the decision to proceed with the Peoples March on Washington. He is concerned that with the recent assassination of Dr. King this action will only alienate Congress and the American public. Hence the march could cause more bloodshed.