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Letter from Mrs. Forest Dana to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Mrs. Forest Dana writes Dr. King to express her displeasure in his outspoken stance against the Vietnam War. She acknowledges the withdrawal of her support and feels that he has done a disservice to Negroes in America. She believes he should focus on civil rights and not interfere with the war.

150 Religious Leaders March on OEO

Friday, October 14, 1966

This press release addresses Sargent Shrivers' decision not to refund the Child Development Group of Mississippi and to express concerns regarding the National War on Poverty.

Letter from Tim Bowden to MLK

Tuesday, January 16, 1968

Tim Bowden requests an interview with Dr. King for the Australian Broadcasting Commission.

The Nobel Couple

Thursday, December 10, 1964

The cover photo of the December 1964 issue of The American Chronicle captures Dr. and Mrs. King after they discover he was named the winner of the year's Nobel Peace Prize.

SCLC Annual Meeting Program

Tuesday, September 25, 1962

This program outlines an annual meeting for the SCLC. The guest list includes Hall of Fame player Jackie Robinson, Septima Clark and Joseph E. Lowery.

The Power of Nonviolence

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.

Time to Retire

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

This New York Times article advocates the mandatory retirement of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover upon his 70th birthday. The article specifically references Director Hoover's description of Dr. King as "the most notorious liar in the country."

Invitation from Frederick S. Wallin to MLK

Saturday, December 14, 1963

Frederick E. Wallin invites Dr. King to speak at the Alderson-Broaddus College's Civic Interest Week, a weeklong study and discussion on political and economic concerns. He explains that he is inviting the most controversy speakers would seriously appreciated Dr. King's attendance.

Constitution and By-Laws of the SCLC, Inc.

The SCLC exhibits its rules and regulations for the stability of the organization in this Constitution and by-laws. SCLC's constitution addresses several organizational related factors including board responsibilities, meetings, membership and chapter development.

Letter from J. Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965

J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, sends his thanks for Dr. King's telegram concerning the recent work of FBI agents in Alabama.

MLK Letter to Mr. Abe Feinglass

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. King writes to Abe Feinglass of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen's Union, thanking him for the union's booklet on civil rights, "The Time Is Now." King also encloses a statement of endorsement.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968

An anonymous supporter sends an encouraging letter to Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Dwight Campbelll

Friday, September 11, 1964

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Methodist Youth Fellowship to speak in Philadelphia.

Letter from Negro Non-Commissioned Officers to Civil Rights Leaders

Saturday, January 7, 1967

The non-commissioned officers of Fort Polk write major civil rights organizations and publications to share their story of segregation and discrimination in the town of Leesville. The authors hope that their letter will be published - exposing the injustices.

Letter from Herbert G. Cave to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Director Dr. Herbert G. Cave represents the Department of Anesthesiology at the Harlem Hospital Center in congratulating Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Seven years earlier, in 1958, Dr. King had been a surgical patient of the hospital due to being stabbed with a letter opener while on a book tour.

Letter from a Disgruntled Author

The author expresses his grievances towards Dr. King and his leadership of the civil rights movement.

Dr. King Announces Appointment of Director of New SCLC Project to Train Urban Negro Leaders

Wednesday, January 10, 1968

In a press release, Dr. King announces Rev. T.Y. Rogers as the Director of the Negro ministerial training, a project created by the SCLC. The purpose of this program is to provide training seminars for ministers, which will ultimately assist congregational members with employment, economic development, voter registration, and education.

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

Letter from John A. Collison to MLK

Saturday, August 15, 1964

John Collision writes Dr. King regarding race relations in America. Collision wants Dr. King to understand that majority of whites have no hatred toward blacks, but instead "a strangeness" and questioning of why people are different shades.

"Question of Credibility"

Sunday, October 16, 1966

In this article, the author highlights and questions the credibility of The Child Development Group, which was created to assist in educating the youth of Mississippi.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy Regarding MLK Memorial Service

Dr. Abernathy receives this letter from an anonymous sender suggesting that the SCLC plan a memorial service in commemoration of Dr. King on Emancipation Day. The writer provides a list of music and poems that would be appropriate for the occasion.

SCLC Report on the Status of the Affiliate Department

Monday, June 12, 1967

T. Y. Rogers gives a detailed report as the Acting Director of the SCLC Affiliates Department. He includes certain organization procedures that will enhance the vitality of the staff and the number of affiliates in various regions of the country.

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Finch to Mr. M. Nance, Jr.

Friday, February 16, 1968

This letter, dated February 16, 1968, was written to Mr. M. Nance, Jr. from Mrs. Finch. In this letter, she states that while the situation in Orangeburg is "regrettable" it can be fixed. She says that other ethnic groups would not lead demonstrations as blacks have. She says black people lack "imagination and energy''. Finch states that while she believes blacks have suffered "grievances, she has contempt for so-called "free loaders".

Letter from H. Robert Gemmer to MLK

Thursday, December 1, 1966

The Rev. H. Robert Gemmer, of the Utica Area Council of Churches, donates one share of Commonwealth Life Insurance Company stock to Dr. King in support of the SCLC.

Workers Defense League Docket

The Workers Defense League was an organization that defended workers in the interest of social and economic justice. This docket is simply a schedule of the upcoming proceedings in a court of law. The lawsuits deal with immigration, selective service, and the rights of the mentally ill, to name a few.

The World of Books

Saturday, June 17, 1967

This is a broad review of Dr. King's publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The article also notes that this was the first book Dr. King has released since his acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.

Letter from MLK to Frank B. Lowell

Monday, October 14, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Frank Lowell's letter regarding the SCLC's current mission. Dr. King briefly explains the nonviolent philosophy, the beliefs of the SCLC, and race relations in America.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Senator Kenneth B. Keating responds to Dr. King's previous message by providing him with a copy of a statement he delivered before the Senate passed the Civil Rights Bill.

Moral and Religious Imperatives for Brotherhood

Saturday, February 9, 1963

Dr. King shares how important it is for America to obtain racial integration.

Correspondence to MLK from D. Leon Everett II

Saturday, July 3, 1965

D. Leon Everett is notifying Dr. King that he will be sending two checks from his church for the SCLC and SNCC. He offers his continuous support for the movement. He makes mention of information in regards to holding a recital for Mrs. King and a souvenir book