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"Pittsburgh, PA"

Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This final organizing manual for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom details all logistics of the march, including the purpose of the march and accommodations for arriving in Washington, D.C.

"We're Here Because We're Tired"

Civil rights leader Andrew Young expresses the collective frustration of the African-American community concerning employment discrimination, housing segregation, and the welfare system.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

Letter from Carey Preston to MLK

Tuesday, May 5, 1964

Carey B. Preston, Administrative Secretary for Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc., urges Dr. King to re-examine his schedule in order to address their convention during the summer of 1964.

Humanism

Dr. King discusses the relationship between God and humanist thinking.

The Black Revolution

This pamphlet produced by the SCLC is an excerpt from Thomas Merton's "The Black Revolution: Letters to a White Liberal." Merton seeks to awaken the conscience of white America by presenting the Negro perspective in the struggle for civil rights. He discusses how Dr. King utilizes the philosophy of nonviolence as a tool of progress and the contrasting reaction of Negros based upon their religious association as either Christian or Muslim. The concluding message is a call for the complete reform of America's social system which permits and breeds injustice.

Letter From MLK to Eugene Exman

Friday, March 9, 1962

Dr. King, in this correspondence to Dr. Eugene Exman, expressed his joy in finding out that his book was selected, out of 500, to be presented to President John Kennedy. Dr. King, furthermore, apologized for a continued delay in finishing a manuscript of sermons for a second book. Dr. King's sermons would be converted into his second publication, "Strength to Love."

Response to Reasons Why African Americans Should Boycott Whitey's Olympics

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

The writer responds to an article in The Post on why African Americans should boycott the Olympics. He believes that Negroes should return to Africa or form their own community in the US separate from whites. God did not intend whites and Negroes to live together, the author maintains, or would have made them the same color. Negroes should take responsibility for their own condition rather than blaming whites. test

Letter from J. DeWitt Fox to MLK Regarding Smoking

Tuesday, February 21, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Fox writes to Dr. King requesting a picture, a biographical sketch, and a brief statement promoting good health amongst teenagers while also discouraging smoking. Mr. Fox would like to include Dr. King’s statement in the book “Why Not Smoke.”

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy regarding the topic of monotheism.

Note from Joan Daves to Dr. King

Sunday, September 22, 1963

This note is to request Dr. King's signature on a contract with British publishers, Hodder & Stroughton in London for his book "Strength To Love."

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Financial Report of SCLC

Friday, May 19, 1967

This document is the SCLC's summary of income and disbursements for the fiscal period of May 15-19, 1967.

The Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

This program commemorates the inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster as the seventh president of Morehouse College.

1965 Annual Board Meeting for SCLC

Thursday, April 1, 1965

This document details the agenda at the Annual Board Meeting for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Casten, M.D.

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Dr. King took the opportunity to address this letter to Daniel Casten, M.D. thanking him for his financial donation to the Mississippi "James Meredith" March. He noted that the march allowed Negroes, in Mississippi, to resolve their fears and fight for justice. A key quotation, in this document, stated to Dr. Casten, "You are a part of that dedicated group of people standing as a beacon light of hope to all of the disinherited men and women of our nation."

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 22, 1963

Reverend L. K. Jackson commends Dr. King on his ongoing efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Kathy Sasso

Monday, April 27, 1964

Dr. King shares his pleasure in being named "Person of the Week" by Miss Sasso's class. He encloses a copy of one of his speeches.

The Martin Luther King Column (1)

Dr. King discusses the accomplishments of the Montgomery bus boycott, the challenges Negros will face, and the leadership skills of Ralph Abernathy.

Letter from MLK to William Proxmire

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks William Proxmire for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

MLK Statement Before the Credentials Committee of the DNC

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King addresses the Democratic National Committee urging them to stand up against the inequities that prevent Negro participation in the political process in the state of Mississippi.

Suffering

Dr. King quotes and comments on Shakespeare's "Henry V."

Letter from Milton S. Eisenhower to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966

This letter from former President Eisenhower's brother Milton, on behalf of Planned Parenthood World Population, requests that Dr. King serve the organization in order to "lend important moral support."

Telegram to W. L. James from Dr. and Ms. King

Monday, January 2, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. King write Mrs. James expressing condolences following the death of her husband. Dr. James was a music educator at Spelman College and a 1923 graduate of Morehouse College . He served as Chairman of the Music Department at Spelman and Director of the Glee Club from 1933 to 1966. Dr. James died December 27, 1966.

New York Welfare Organizers to Join Poor People's Campaign

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Susan Oreskes, a welfare organizer in New York City, informs Dr. King that 2000 people demonstrated as part of Dr. Spock’s peace campaign. She and Beulah Sanders, Citywide Coordinator of Welfare Groups, took 4 busses from the Upper West Side to George Wiley’s Poverty Rights Convention in Washington in August where they met with Senator Jacob Javits about a guaranteed minimum income. Mrs. Oreskes also states she wants to work with Dr. King and includes addresses for Beulah Sanders and Arnaldo Barrow of the Puerto Rican Community Project.

At the Beginning of the Youth Leadership Conference

Friday, April 15, 1960

While speaking to the Youth Leadership Conference in Raleigh, NC, Dr. King elaborates on the student sit-in movements, which he says served as a representation of the plight of the American Negro regarding their struggle for justice. Dr. King further lists the various details of their strategy for victory.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Blandena Lee Kossodo

Tuesday, November 29, 1966

Dora McDonald writes Blandena Lee Kossodo expressing that Dr. King is honored to have been offered to write the introduction to her book. However, Dr. King has to decline because he is writing his own book and for other publications.

Letter from Lucy Melhuish to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Lucy A. Melhuish requests Dr. King's assistance in acquiring copies of speeches from the Poor People's March on Washington. Ms. Melhuish is a graduate student working on her doctorate degree at California State College.

Letter from Frank Sullivan to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, the president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Mr. Sullivan, informs Dr. King that the organization will look to donate to the S.C.L.C.