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Letter from MLK to Epsicopal House of Prayer

Thursday, February 22, 1968
Philadelphia, PA

This is a copy of the response letter dated February 9, 1968. It is addressed to the Episcopal House of Prayer in Philadelphia, Pa. Dr.King apologized for sending such a late response to their letter. He thanked them for their contributions to the SCLC and for supporting the movement for racial equality.

Dr. King-Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brown's views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Scientific Method (Wieman)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's "Religious Experience and Scientific Method." He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Book Outline: Education and the Urban Poor

Michigan (MI), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., California (CA), Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Wisconsin (WI), Berkeley, CA, Illinois (IL)

This book outline lists the chapters and contributing authors of the publication "Education and the Urban Poor." The authors represented include educational professionals from all over the country including Robert L. Green, Associate Professor at Michigan State University and Education Director for the SCLC. Dr. King is listed as the author of Chapter Two entitled "Education and the Negro Revolution."

Letter from The American Foundation On Nonviolence to David Hunter

Thursday, January 18, 1968
New York, NY

The American Foundation On Nonviolence makes an inquiry to the distribution of grant funds from David Hunter.

Letter from Edward Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 18, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Edward Kennedy thanks Dr. and Mrs. King for their hospitality during the Annual Convention of the SCLC.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mr. Robert Friedman

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Oregon (OR)

In this letter Ms. Dora McDonald informs Mr. Friedman of the University of Oregon that Dr. King's schedule will not allow for a contribution to "Forensic Quarterly". Such regrets were increasingly frequent occurrences as Dr. King’s prominence and workload grew.

Hegel

Dr. King references German philosopher, George Hegal, in this handwritten notecard.

Letter from Lance Redford to Mrs. King

New York, NY, New York (NY)

Lance Redford, a student in New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King.

Letter from Paul Good to MLK

Connecticut (CT), New York (NY), Washington (WA)

In this letter, Paul Good repeats his first attempt to volunteer as a "press liaison" for the SCLC, and presents Dr. King with his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign.

Letter to Dr. King

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
VIETNAM

The author of this letter writes to oppose Dr. King's view of the government being the greatest infuser of violence. The author attributes Communism as the root of violence, and asks Dr. King to consider the consequences of unfavorable criticism during such times.

Brunner & Niebuhr

Dr. King relates Swiss theologian Emil Brunner to American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr, in that they both argue that reason is for adjusting to the material world, and faith is for dealing with God.

Letter from John Brush to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), VIETNAM, Chicago, IL

John W. Brush expresses his dissent with Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts for changing his stance on the Vietnam War. Brush also commends Dr. King on his oppositional stance.

Worship

Dr. King references William Ernest Hocking and James Bissett Pratt regarding religious worship.

Paint

Noting the vastness of the sky and "heavens," Dr. King comments on the Earth, stars, and surrounding planets.

Crusade for Citizenship

Friday, October 21, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This check was issued to Chauncey Williams for his assistance with the Crusade For Citizenship's voter registration campaign.

Anonymous Letter from Jail - Birmingham, AL

Birmingham, AL

In this letter an anonymous writer shares his gratitude for all the support extended as Dr. King and his colleagues were incarcerated at a jail in Birmingham, AL.

Telegram from MLK to the Honorable Carl Sanders

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

Dr. King invites the Honorable Carl Sanders to share the pulpit with himself and Mayor Ivan Allen at the Annual Layman's Day celebration at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He also invites him to a dinner to honor Governor Nelson Rockefeller at the home of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr.

Tuesday, December 13, 1966
New York, NY

Dr. King extended his appreciation to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr. for the letter and copy of Mr. Wood's speech given on the Demonstration Cities Program.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Casper I. Glenn

Monday, October 21, 1963
Arizona (AZ), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to Rev. Glenn, President of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, regarding Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech. Dr. King informs him that the Motown Record Corporation has been granted rights of this speech.

Letter from Frank Annunzio to MLK

Saturday, January 9, 1965
Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Frank Annunzio informs Dr. King that he appreciates his views on the Mississippi Delegation. Annunzio states that he voted to remove the seniority status of the Mississippi Congressmen "from their respective Committees."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Myles Campbell

Monday, December 23, 1963
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses his thanks to Mrs. Myles Campbell for the kind response to his "I Have A Dream" speech during the March on Washington. He explains that prayer is needed for those who are unable to see past their own prejudices and acknowledge everyone as God's children. Dr. King asserts that the federal government is needed to change behaviors in the south and send Mrs. Campbell season's greetings.

Letter from Annis Pratt to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Professor Annis Pratt of Spelman College writes about her support for the proposed Poor People's Campaign. She suggests that the problems traditionally associated with race may be more economic in nature, and encloses a check from her husband and herself for the march.

Dr. King Announces Appointments in SCLC Operation Breadbasket

Monday, January 29, 1968
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Texas (TX), Los Angeles, CA, North Carolina (NC), Brooklyn, NY, Cincinnati, OH, Cleveland, OH

Dr. King announces two major appointments to the SCLC Operation Breadbasket staff. Reverend Jesse Jackson is named National Director and Reverend Calvin Morris is named Associate Director in Chicago. Operation Breadbasket was formed in 1962 to improve economic conditions in black communities throughout the US.

How Much Head Start for Mississippi's Children?

Tuesday, November 1, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C.

Kay Longcope describes the current status of the Child Development Group of Mississippi following the decision to pull funding for the program made by the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Telegram from Mathew Ahmann to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Mathew Ahmann, on behalf of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, congratulates the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for a decade of leadership.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968
Chattanooga, TN, Memphis, TN, Connecticut (CT), California (CA), Nashville, TN

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Man

Dr. King quotes Pascal's "Pensees" in this excerpt that focuses on man's greatness.

"University Plans 'Liberties' Program"

Monday, February 21, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

Experts at Columbia University plan to adopt a program that will make the meaning of American liberties more relatable to students.

Letter from Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966
Oslo, Norway, SWEDEN

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway invites Dr. King to speak in Oslo, with proceeds from the broadcast of his speech going towards the Civil Rights Movement.