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White House Message on Civil Rights

Friday, January 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

President Johnson's message to Congress explains strides the U.S. has made in the social, educational and economic conditions of minorities in America. It also discusses areas that need improvement such as infant mortality rates and poverty levels among non-whites. The President calls for legislation to prevent violence against those exercising their civil rights, to strengthen enforcement powers of the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission, to prevent discrimination on federal and state juries, and to guarantee fair housing.

Telegram from Beryl Sacks to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 14, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Wisconsin (WI)

Ms. Beryl Sacks inquires about the availability of Dr. King to speak for the Speakers Bureau Adult Education Council.

Letter from Dora Byron to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The assistant director for the Office of Community Educational Service at Emory University invites Dr. King to appear on a local television program. She informs Dr. King that the program will feature influential leaders from the South and consist of a 30-minute interview by an Emory faculty member. In closing, she asks Dr. King to commit to a date between March 19 and April 16, 1963.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Linda F. Neslage

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Dora McDonald informs Linda F. Neslage that she has the permission to print Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in the textbook, "Principles and Types of Speech."

Invitation from J.G. Kennelly to MLK

Wednesday, April 24, 1963
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

J.G. Kennelly invites Dr. King to address the Christian Culture Forum during their 1963-1964 season in Hamilton, Canada.

Telegram from MLK to Richard Maguire of the DNC

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs Richard Maguire of the Democratic National Committee that he is unable to accept an invitation to the pre-inaugural dinner.

Letter from M. G. Gilligan to MLK and James Baldwin

Saturday, July 6, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Mrs. M. G. Gilligan expresses admiration to Dr. King and Mr. Baldwin for the production of the television program entitled "Perspectives."

Meet the Press Interview

Sunday, August 13, 1967
Washington, D.C., Kentucky (KY), VIETNAM, Louisville, KY

This is a transcript of NBC television's Meet the Press interview with Dr. King in August 1967 with Edwin Newman as moderator. King answered questions about his views on the Vietnam conflict, nonviolence, and the presidency of Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Lucks Regarding Assistant Pastor

In this letter, Dr. King advises Rev. Lucks on choosing an assistant pastor.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Regarding Quotes

Tuesday, June 16, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves asks Dora McDonald to show Dr. King quotes attached to the document. Joan Daves also asks that comments and reviews be passed to her respectively.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. James Bevel

Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Washington (WA)

Dr. King informs Rev. Bevel of an urgent meeting with the Action Committee for Washington Mobilization at Paschal's Motel.

Letter from Topsy Eubanks to the SCLC

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Council of Christian Women Voters in Augusta, Georgia sends the SCLC a contribution and informs the organization of their desire to become an SCLC affiliate.

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, July 25, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This document outlines the financial statements of the Atlanta home office of the SCLC. The figures are from July 25, 1966 through July 28, 1966.

Swedish Martin Luther King Fund

Tuesday, March 29, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden, DENMARK, NORWAY, FINLAND

The Martin Luther King Fund was an internationally housed organization in which numerous countries participated in helping to support and spread Dr. King's messages. This document represents the facts and activity program of the Swedish organization headquartered in Stockholm. Included are lists of the Executive Committee, Honorary Board members, and activities designed to create a better understanding of Dr. King's work.

United States Commission on Civil Rights Information Bulletin

Monday, February 1, 1965
Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, South Carolina (SC), Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Colorado (CO), Illinois (IL), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY)

This information bulletin published by the US Commission on Civil Rights provides updates of current activities. The bulletin includes information regarding voting rights hearings, education in the south, and news from private organizations like CORE, NAACP and the Council for Civil Unity.

Letter from Nancy F. Oakes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Nancy Oakes writes a letter of support to Reverend Ralph Abernathy and wishes him success with the March for the Poor People's Crusade.

Letter from Leonard Manning to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Leonard Manning offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Spirit

Dr. King writes that there is no way of defining the essential nature of spirit because it is manifested only in the activities of intellect, sensibility and will.

The New Frontiersmen

New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Vermont (VT), Colorado (CO), CHINA, CUBA, Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Shreveport, LA, Iowa (IA)

William Miller recaps the recent presidential elections and the important issues President John F. Kennedy will have to address. President Kennedy has proposed a new program called the New Frontier, which for many African Americans, is believed to be a part of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement. Miller states that the Civil Rights Movement is not one that can be overlooked by the President and must be seriously addressed if he wants to stay true to his political platform.

Letter from Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 16, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves tells Dora McDonald that she had tentatively spoken to Dr. King about accepting the invitation to speak at The University Settlement award ceremony. She asks Ms. McDonald if she would keep the date for the engagement should he be able to attend. Daves also requests a copy of Dr. King's itinerary.

Letter from E. B. Hathaway to MLK and Fred C. Bennette

Tuesday, October 3, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

E. B. Hathaway responds to a letter from Dr. King and Rev. Bennette concerning employment opportunities at the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company's new manufacturing plant in Albany, Georgia. Hathaway explains the company's projected construction timeline and ensures Dr. King and Rev. Bennette that hiring practices will be non-discriminatory.

Letter from MLK to Gertrude Corbett

Tuesday, January 25, 1966
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King thanks Miss Corbett for her message regarding the SCLC Chicago Campaign. He agrees with Miss Corbett's view that the current Negro dilemma is rooted in multiple causes. He also discusses standards of living, economic conditions and society as a whole.

Letter from Daniel Tyler to MLK

Monday, February 15, 1965
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA

Author Daniel Tyler discusses the contributions he has submitted to the National Baptist Convention. He requests that Dr. King send him information on how to assist the cause of voter registration.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

Nashville, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Letter of Support from Dorothy Hill to MLK

Saturday, July 1, 1967
Colorado (CO), Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Miss Dorothy P. Hill writes this letter to Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where do we go From Here: Chaos or Community?" As previous Director of the Summer Institute for Social Progress at Wellesley College, Hill learned that "skin color seems no bar to congeniality," and she knows of many others who have had similar positive experiences. Hill writes that she admires Dr. King for his principles and leadership ability.

Letter from Bette Zugerman to Rev. Abernathy, SCLC

Saturday, April 27, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. Zugerman writes Reverend Abernathy to introduce an enclosed document which she suggests is the "one and only non-violent answer to alleviate the suffering of all people."

Resurrection

Dr. King paraphrases Karl Barth's description of the resurrection in "The Epistle to the Romans."

God is a Spirit

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "God Is A Spirit" and lists three different meanings for that assertion.

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965
New York, NY

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Ex-West Sider

Chicago, IL

The author discusses their experiences with living in substandard housing in a low socioeconomic environment. The author also questions the racial focus of Chicago's appeasement to the Negro.