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"Poor People's Campaign"

Letter from MLK to A.S. Grant

Dr. King thanks Elder Grant for the kind remarks from his previous letter and lets him know that due to the business of his schedule as the President of the SCLC, he is unable to devote attention to Grant's proposal.

MLK's Address to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity

Monday, October 12, 1964

This address by Dr. King was delivered to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity the day before it was announced that he had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In addressing the topic "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution," Dr. King argues that the church must inspire it's members to be active and advocate against injustice, reaffirm the misconduct of racial segregation, and work towards social change in a nonviolent and peaceful manner.

Letter from Annalee Stewart to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 1, 1965

Annalee Stewart confirms with Dora McDonald that Dr. King will be the keynote speaker for the 50th Anniversary of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom.

Letter from John and Elfriede Kallpelz to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963

John and Elfriede Kallpelz send Dr. King a financial contribution in honor of the late President Kennedy. Mr. Kallpelz, a native of Atlanta writing from Germany, explains the closeness he feels to Dr. King's work.

Man

Dr. King writes his thoughts on man.

Letter from Hadley Executive Committee to MLK

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Director of the Hadley Executive Committee, requests Dr. King's participation in the Hadley Memorial Fund lecture.

Letter From Intergroup Relations Agencies to Ivan Allen

Friday, September 9, 1966

The senders of this letter request a meeting with Atlanta Mayor Ivan Allen to discuss inadequate housing, overcrowded schools, under-employment and "minimal enforcement of the city's building code." The senders represent a variety of organizations and offer their expertise in developing solutions to the problems facing Atlanta.

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.

Letter from Barbara Meredith to MLK

Barbara Meredith communicates with Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham jail. She does not understand why individuals professing to be Christians approve of segregation. Meredith offers her prayers to Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy and others in the midst of the struggle to end segregation.

Religion

Dr. King writes about the role of religion as an ideal and as a unifying force.

Letter form Gloria Kenny to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

Gloria Kenny praises Dr. King and the SCLC for sending a small group of individuals to the Agape Mass at MaryMount College. She also commends him on his efforts to speak out against the Vietnam War.

Letter from Dr. Eliot Stadler to MLK

Friday, August 14, 1964

Dr. Stadler writes Dr. King regarding his inability to join him in his campaign for the "rights of man." He expresses his regret with an enclosure of a financial contribution.

Proclaim Liberty...

Carl T. Rowan, one of the most prominent black journalists of the 20th century, is honored at the Progressive Club in Atlanta, GA. This reservation form was sent out to invited guests of the celebration.

Letter of Inquiry from Carol Hess to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1968

In this letter Carol Hess of New York requests an audience with Dr. King. She is writing a paper pertaining to the Birmingham March.

MLK Note Card - Abstract Elements and Sets

Dr. King discusses the philosopher Wh's perspective of the abstract element known as a moment.

Telegram from MLK to H. Rap Brown

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

In this telegram, Dr. King tells H. Rap Brown that he will undertake all measures to stop Brown being denied free movement and basic constitutional rights.

Metaphysics

Dr. King quotes William James' perception of metaphysics.

Letter from Mrs. Presley Layer to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

As a member of the Urban League and other civic organizations, Mrs. Layer expresses her concerns about the conduct of marches verses a more militant tactic. Mrs. Layer asserts that we live in a violent nation and is concerned that violent pacifist will become uncontrollable. She concludes with informing Dr. King she is an admirer and long supporter of the SCLC.

Brief for the Petitioners

Saturday, October 1, 1966

This brochure illustrates questions as well as events pertaining to petitioners during the Civil Rights Movement. Important petitioners, such as Dr. King and Ralph David Abernathy, were convicted and charged with Contempt of Court in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Monday, August 2, 1965

Sargent Shriver, Director for the Office of Economic Opportunity, regretfully informs Dr. King that he will not be able to meet with SCLC's delegates in Birmingham for their convention.

Mars Lecture Series

Tuesday, April 15, 1958

This 1958 program features Dr. King as guest lecturer for the Mars Lectures at Northwestern University.

Statement on Penance for Violence in Albany, Georgia

Monday, July 30, 1962

Dr. King calls for a day of penance that will serve as a tactic of the self-purification step of the nonviolence method. Dr. King urges for the City Commission to talk with leaders of the Albany Movement.

Letter from Reginald Holmes to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Reginald Holmes, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King for information about his church and his role as spiritual leader.

Letter from Jackie Robinson to MLK

Tuesday, October 9, 1962

Jackie Robinson writes Dr. King to accept a position of responsibility with the SCLC.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, January 13, 1964

Joan Daves writes Dr. King regarding an incomplete document that he signed for the "English tax people." For his convenience, she encloses a pre-written letter to send to England once the document is officially completed.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. W. A. Visser't Hooft

Monday, December 20, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Hooft confirming that Dr. King accepts his invitation to speak in Geneva. McDonald inquires about expenses for Dr. King and one of his aids and encloses a photograph and biography for Dr. Hooft to utilize.

Letter from Secretary to Joan Regarding the Rights to "Strength to Love"

Monday, June 15, 1964

In this letter, the secretary asks Joan the status of the Japanese Edition to "Strength To Love", since Dr. King hadn't had the time to write the preface.

Letter from MLK to Oklahomans for Negotiation Now

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Oklahoma City extended by Margaret Novitski of Oklahomans for Negotiation Now.

Anti-Poverty Bill

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

This document outlines and provides the status of the Anti-Poverty legislation in Congress.