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"Poor People's Campaign"

Thompson Memorial Chapel Program Featuring MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1961

This program highlights Dr. King as guest preacher for Thompson Memorial Chapel's Sunday service.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

This sermon is one draft of Dr. King's "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life." It was first delivered by Dr. King to the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Another version is entitled, "The Dimensions of a Complete Life." The first dimension is concerned with the well-being of the self. The second dimension is concerned with the well-being of others. The last dimension is concerned with reaching towards God.
As Dr. King implies, if all of these dimensions are equal, then a complete life will be obtained.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, May 22, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the British Broadcasting Company wants to read extracts from "Strength to Love" in their "First Day of the Week" program.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

A Blind Woman's Request for MLK

Juilia Lockheart, a blind 75 year old woman, requests aid from Dr. King. Many people envisioned Dr. King to be the savior of their time; they would contact him with unrelated requests outside of the non-violent movement in hopes that he could be the remedy to their current issue.

Letter from "A Southerner" to MLK

This letter, signed by, "A Southerner", suggests that Dr. King persuade Black people to return to Africa.

Letter from Pastor G. Murray Branch to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

In this letter, Pastor Branch invites Dr. King to be the speaker on the 90th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Letter from MLK to Donna Mitchell

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a previous letter sent by Donna Mitchell. He shares the gratification of knowing that young people are aware of "the changing world in which we live." King concludes by stating that correspondence from youth is always welcomed.

Power

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

Holiday Card from Dr. Nirmal Kumar Bose

The following document is a holiday card from Dr. Bose to Dr. and Mrs. King.

SCLC Newsletter: Solid Wall of Segregation Cracks at Albany

In this newsletter, SCLC announces integration in Albany, GA and believes that the city will soon face the legal death of segregation. They also inform readers of the arrest of SCLC Petersburg President, David Gunter.

North and South

The SCLC newsletter informs its readers of the recent events that its members have taken part in. Hosea Williams went to Chicago to conduct a voter registration and voter motivation drive. Also, the SCLC's Operation Breadbasket, led by Jesse Jackson, made an agreement with a big food chain company. The company agreed to transfer some accounts from white banks to struggling Negro banks and to offer its Negro customers products manufactured by small Negro firms.

Letter from Isaac Foster Regarding a Scholarship

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

Isaac Foster, a student at Queens College, informs his reader of reasons why he should be awarded a scholarship.

Goldwater's Nomination

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

Dr. King expresses his disdain for Republican presidential candidate Senator Barry Goldwater. Dr. King believes that Senator Goldwater is not an adequate candidate, due to his lack of knowledge in foreign policy and philosophies about equality for all.

Dr. King's Strategy

In this article L. Harold DeWolf, dean of the Wesley Theological Seminary, describes the strategy of Dr. King. He asserts that Dr. King follows "the way of the cross" and confronts racial hatred with "daring love."

Letter from MLK to Dorothy O. Bucklin

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Dr. King graciously declines Mrs. Bucklin's invitation to speak in Green Lake, Wisconsin under the "auspices" of the American Baptist Convention. Mrs. Bucklin serves as Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Society.

Letter from MLK to John Conyers

Friday, February 19, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Congressman John Conyers' visit to Selma, Alabama. Dr. King requests Congressman Conyers' support for passing federal legislation that will eliminate the barriers to a free voting process for African American citizens.

Scholarship Essay

Kathleen Lyons, an artist and student from St. Norbert College in Wisconsin, writes this scholarship essay to solicit funds to attend school in Chicago. In the paper, she recounts her experience with art centered civil rights work in Chicago and Wisconsin in various schools, a Native American reservation and a state reformatory. Additionally, Lyons explains that in the summer of 1966 while doing volunteer work in Chicago, she became involved with "Martin Luther King's freedom movement."

Letter from Arthur LeSueur to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967

Arthur LeSueur, a War World II veteran, expresses his support of Dr. King's endeavors to gain equality in America. He hopes that Dr. King will not be discouraged by the great injustices he has faced and will continue to hold strong to his position.

Letter from W. Russell Chapman to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1962

The York County, Pennsylvania branch of the NAACP sends a second invitation to Dr. King to be a guest speaker.

And There Was Love

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Letter from Professor Clyde Manschreck to MLK

Sunday, July 7, 1963

Clyde L. Manschreck, a professor of church history at the Methodist Theological School in Ohio, asks permission to include "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in his upcoming collection entitled "History of Christianity from the Reformation to the Present," as well as the letter that inspired it.

Telegram from Committee of Concerned Mothers to MLK

Monday, February 22, 1965

The Committee of Concerned Mothers for Mrs. Malcolm X and Family writes to Dr. King requesting the SCLC to help assist Mrs. Malcolm X and her four children in the wake of her husband's assassination.

Emotionalism in Religion

Dr. King records a quote from a book entitled "The Gift of Tongues, A Study in the Pathological Aspects of Christianity".

Letter Starlet Roberts to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

In this letter, Starlet Roberts, a fifth grade student, asks Dr. King for a picture for her class book of Famous Negroes.

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College for 1944-1948

Tuesday, November 7, 1950

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College from 1944-1948.

Telegram from Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

Dover Beale and Theodore Patterson send well wishes and hopes for a full recovery to Dr. King.

Letter from Eula Shaw to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Calling Dr. King "The Trouble Maker of the United States," Mrs. Shaw criticizes Dr. King's methods in the Civil Rights Movement. She argues that a "campaign of love is in order" rather than demonstrations.

God

Dr. King expounds on points made about the idea of "God," by Immanuel Kant, William James, and W.E. Hocking.

Letter from Birt Waite to MLK

Sunday, November 6, 1966

Mr. Waite writes to Dr. King explaining the difficulties that have arisen with trying to give the SCLC his 1958 Rambler.