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"Poor People's Campaign"

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

Memorandum from John Gunther to Urban Coalition Steering Committee

Monday, December 11, 1967

John Gunther submits a report to the members of the Steering Committee of the Urban Coalition stating that the Urban Coalition should be concerned with issues related to education, employment and housing. The memorandum outlines the job of the Council of Local Coalitions and states that the Steering Committee may add to the Coalition's numbers at any time. Lastly, Gunther informs the members of the staffing polices explaining how staffing will be planned on a yearly basis.

Tillich's Definition of God

Dr. King documents philosopher Paul Tillich's definition of God from his book "Systematic Theology."

Telegram from Richard Daley to Dr. King Requesting Meeting

Chicago Mayor Richard Daley invites Dr. King to meet with him and other religious leaders to discuss programs that will improve the quality of life in Chicago.

Letter from Marshall Breland to MLK

Saturday, January 29, 1966

Marshall Breland, a student from P.S. 200, requests information from Dr. King for the purposes of a school related assignment. Breland deems Dr. King "The Non-Violent Crusader".

Dr. King Notecard

In this notecard, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoint pertaining to the doctrine of "Puritanism."

Letter from Mary A. Edmonds to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mary A. Edmonds expresses her disapproval of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

The Crisis - NAACP 50 Years - Freedom Civil Rights Progress

This 1959 issue of The Crisis celebrates the 50th anniversary of the NAACP. The contents include events that vary from legislation cases to African-American accomplishments relevant to the time.

Letter From MLK to John R. Kellam Regarding Vietnam War

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Kellam for not only his letter but for forwarding a letter from Democratic Rhode Island Senator John Pastore. All three men oppose the war in Vietnam, and Dr. King responds that is becoming increasingly difficult to understand the reasons behind US foreign policy.

MLK in Memoriam

Following Dr. King's assassination, this tribute highlights King's life and the impact he had on the world. It includes a reading from "The Negro American: A Documentary History," an audio recording of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream Speech" and his eulogy. test2

MLK Press Statement Regarding Riots in Los Angeles

Friday, August 20, 1965

In this statement to the press, Dr. King comments on the Watts Riots that took place in Los Angeles, California. He further discusses the economic, social and racial inequalities that he feels were the cause of the violence.

Notecard on Philosophy

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Dr. Brightman's views on philosophy . This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Evil - Psalms

Dr. King writes on the subject of evil according to the book of Psalms.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald Regarding Samples

Thursday, June 25, 1964

In this letter, Ms. Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, is asking Ms. McDonald if Dr. King wants to see copies of the promotion for his book's paperback edition.

Ossie Davis Defines Blackness and Whiteness

In this document,Ossie Davis uses Roget's Thesaurus and defines the words "whiteness" and "blackness" only to find many positive outcomes for whiteness and an abundance of negative synonyms for blackness.

Individualization and Participation

Dr. King records notes on the individualization and participation of man.

Letter from Hosea Williams to MLK

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

Hosea Williams submits his resignation as a staff member of the SCLC. He also requests a meeting with the Steering Committee and Dr. King to discuss unfinished items related to the SCLC.

Letter from Adie Marks to Harry Belafonte

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Adie Marks writes Harry Belafonte in an effort to organize an event consisting of several artists and organizations to combat issues African Americans face in America.

An Appeal from MLK to Negro and White Men of Goodwill

Dr. King discusses the impact that segregated schooling has on Negro children. He urges Negro and "white men of goodwill" to join together in the fight for the integration of schools.

Letter from Merle B. Foreman to MLK

Tuesday, October 11, 1966

Merle B. Foreman is writing to Dr. King in hopes of receiving an autograph. She also encloses a self addressed stamped envelope.

Letter from Ms. Dora McDonald to Mrs. Epworth about an Invitation

Friday, January 12, 1968

Here, Ms. McDonald offers a belated reply to Mrs. Epworth regarding an invitation for Dr. King and his family to dine with the Epworth family. Dr. King does not decline the invitation, but instead takes a raincheck due to an unpredictable schedule.

Letter to Rev. Thomas Thrasher from MLK and Others

Friday, January 11, 1957

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders contact the President of the Montgomery Ministerial Association, Rev. Thomas Thrasher, to compliment him on his statement subsequent to the bombings in Alabama.

Letter from Miss D. McDonald to The Rev. Julian J. Keiser

Monday, June 22, 1964

Miss McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, assures Reverend Keiser that Dr. King's recent trip to Los Angeles was a pleasnt experience. Miss McDonald conveys Dr. King's hope that his "appearance, in some way, proved helpful."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about Protestant Publishing Co. Ltd, lacking the ability to offer better figures, for the Japanese rights to "Strength to Love."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about Speaking Out Article

Friday, September 11, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, communicates with Mr. Hunt of Speaking Out regarding payment and schedule of a feature article to be written by Dr. King.

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

Royalty Statement for Strength To Love

This financial document from Joan Daves, an agent of Harper & Row in New York City, references an itemized Royalty statement for Dr. King's book, "Strength To Love."

Letter from MLK to Dr. Milnor Alexander

Friday, November 6, 1964

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the kick-off celebration for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom 50th Anniversary. A previous engagement in another section of the country prevents Dr. King from accepting. However, Dr. King would later speak for the organization in Philadelphia. Coretta Scott King was a key member and sponsor of the league.

Thank you from SCLC to donor Dr. Jerry Flint

Monday, March 25, 1968

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for the generous contribution made by Jerry Flint. He acknowledges the importance of the continuous support of the contributors so that the fight for social justice and peace can continue.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. W.J. Givan to MLK

Monday, November 27, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Givan urge Dr. King to become a televised preacher, citing a lack thereof and the need for someone to combine the "social gospel" with the Christian fundamentals.