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"Poor People's Campaign"

Memo from Theodore Brown

Monday, January 22, 1968
NIGERIA, New York (NY)

Mr. Brown informs several African American leaders, including Dr. King, of his attempts to raise funds for the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter from Joseph Derman to MLK

Tuesday, March 16, 1965
New Jersey (NJ)

Joseph Derman sends Dr. King a financial contribution to "the great cause." He sends the contribution in memory of the civil rights workers who have passed away.

Letter from Iva Sturm to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

The author requests Dr. King to answer questions to solidify the political practices in America before he is to vote democratically.The questions involve concerns surround military, political, and economic issues within the United States. The authors' primary contention is the Vietnam War.

MLK Thanks a Contributing Author

Dr. King writes to Mr. Morrow thanking him for sending a written manuscript of Marrow's new book. He apologizes for being unable to fully assist him in his writing endeavors.

Letter from John R. Yungblut to CSK

Monday, August 2, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Yungblut of Quaker House, writes Mrs. King to inquire whether the King Children may be interested in participating in a youth dramatics program.

Letter from MLK to Earl Hall

Friday, July 14, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mr. Earl Hall, who sent a letter to the "National Observer" in defense of Dr. King.

Letter from Topsy Eubanks to the SCLC

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Council of Christian Women Voters in Augusta, Georgia sends the SCLC a contribution and informs the organization of their desire to become an SCLC affiliate.

Postcard from Friedrich Derz to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1963
Berlin, Germany, Birmingham, AL

Friedrich Derz's brief message of "solidarity" illustrates the unity fostered by the international community in the fight for civil rights.

Letter from Maddy Tolud to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965
NETHERLANDS

Maddy Tolud, the President of A. R. K., thanks Dr. King for being an honorary member of their organization. Tolud assures him that their members will actively work towards equality until justice prevails.

Letter from Mrs. William Wenger to MLK

Michigan (MI)

Mrs. Wenger pleads with Dr. King to never give up the fight for civil rights.

Crusade For The Ballot

GEORGIA, Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a pamphlet addressing the need for increased registration of Negro voters in the southern states of America.

Letter of Support to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1962

Although unable to send financial support, the author expresses "intense admiration" for Dr. King's leadership and courage.

Ferm, Vergilius (ed)

New York (NY)

Dr. King cites a book written by Vergilius Ferm that discusses theology in America.

The Dexter Echo: Not Guilty!

Wednesday, June 8, 1960
Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL

This article states that Dr. King was found not guilty for tax evasion charges. The state's tax agent refused to lie under oath or allow prejudice to sway the facts.

Letter from Harris Wofford to MLK and Ralph Abernathy

Saturday, November 30, 1957
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Harris Wofford, civil rights supporter and friend of Dr. King, proposes "the right next step" for King and the Montgomery Improvement Association. He suggests round-table conferences composed of white and Negro ministers, an idea inspired by the efforts of Gandhi.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Thursday, February 18, 1960
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Dr. King's business partner writes to him from the Midtown Office in New York regarding a column in which they are working on. His partner assures Dr. King that the column will be successful and discusses future plans and events to help fund raise and raise awareness about the it.

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, March 16, 1967
New York (NY), Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to an upcoming meeting of the Executive Committee of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights.

Letter from Matthew Schoenwald to MLK

Monday, May 18, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Matthew Schoenwald , manager of the Undergarment and Negligee Workers Union, encloses a check in the amount of $100 as a contribution to the SCLC.

City of Philadelphia News Release - James H. J. Tate, Mayor

Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Members of the Cabinet of Mayor James H. J. Tate of the City of Philadelphia release a statement following the assassination of Dr. King. The Cabinet pledges to rededicate to the establishment of equality and justice, to eliminate poverty and intolerable housing condition, and to provide adequate educational systems and facilities, for all citizens.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Letter From George Patton Jr. to MLK

New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

George Patton expresses his disdain to Dr. King about the names that whites call "Black Americans" and offers a list of names that blacks should be "referred to as."

Schleiermacher (Religion)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers" on religion as something experienced.

Legal Petition Made by Karl Von Key Against Selective Service System

Wednesday, June 15, 1966
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, VIETNAM

Karl Von Key petitions the United States District Court of California about his draft into the armed forces. He contends that, as a person of color, he is a colonial subject, not a citizen of the United States. As a colonial subject, he should not be forced to serve in the military. He also writes that he is a conscientious objector and that he believes he was targeted by the local induction station because of his social and political views.

An Appreciation Dinner

Monday, December 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA

This dinner salutes the outstanding service of the SCLC staff. It includes menu items for the gathering as well as a schedule of guest speakers and attendees.

Letter from Herbert J. Kramer to John W. Bloomer

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Herbert J. Kramer informs the managing editor of Birmingham News, about "America's New Commitment" and the "Plowshare Pledge."

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED KINGDOM, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, MOZAMBIQUE, SOUTH AFRICA, Johannesburg, South Africa, INDIA

As Dr. King reflects on his acceptance of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, he draws a parallel to the American Negroes' nonviolent approach to civil rights and the people of India, Africa, and elsewhere throughout the world. King argues that "humanity's desperate need for peace and progress to move into the truly civilized world of the future" will ultimately derive from adherence to non-violence.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC)

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Race Problem

Dr. King discusses the solution to the race problem, citing Reinhold Niebuhr's view that human methods are irrational.

Letter from MLK to Dwight Campbelll

Friday, September 11, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Methodist Youth Fellowship to speak in Philadelphia.

Letter from The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge to MLK

Friday, February 17, 1967
Wisconsin (WI), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

A member of The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge in Milwaukee informs Dr. King of his study on the Negro voter. The study determined that Mississippi has the most non-registered Negro voters.