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Revision on Preferential Treatment

The document contains an addition to a chapter for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this insert, Dr. King seeks to clear up questions surrounding preferential treatment for negroes. According to the text, "The program of special aid for Negroes and other deprived groups is in no sense discrimination in reverse."

Letter from John A. Blatnik to MLK

Thursday, February 27, 1964

John A. Blatnik, Chair of the Democratic Study Group, writes Dr. King thanking him for his recent letter indicating his support for Blatnik's position on civil rights.

Bibliography Compiled by MLK

This handwritten bibliography documents texts that discuss theology.

Is Dialogue Alien to Marxism?" (Polemics)

Czech philosopher Julius Tomin discusses the role of dialogue within Marxist discourse. Critiquing the position set forth by Milan Machovec in his text "Sense of Life," Tomin outlines the the definition of dialogue, the climate necessary for a dialogue to occur, and the role of dialogue in the humanization of men.

News Release Regarding Birmingham Shooting at Liberty Supermarket

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

This SCLC press release was issued in the wake of a violent episode in Birmingham, Alabama on February 21, 1966. That night, 23 year old Emory W. McGowen drove his car into a group of protesters before opening fire on the crowd wounding five people. The protest, called by Hosea L. Williams, was against Liberty Supermarket, a business being targeted for employment discrimination. The release contains information regarding the incident and includes pertinent quotes from Dr. King, Mr. Williams, and local minister and witness Rev. Wood.

Letter from William S. Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1963

William Thompson invites Dr. King to speak at the National Bar Association's 38th Annual Convention in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Ervin R. Meyer to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Ervin R. Meyer informs Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy that he is against the Poor People's March on Washington. Mr. Meyers perceives these demonstrations as attracting "law breakers" that do not reflect Christian actions. The author identifies additional organizations and expresses their opposition to the SCLC's Christian mission.

Category Time

Dr. King outlines Paul Tillich's view on time.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

Letter from Rev. Allen Clark to MLK

Rev. Allen Clark sends Dr. King words of encouragement and requests a copy of a book regarding Dr. King's faith.

Letter from Gene Young to Joan Daves

Monday, May 15, 1967

Gene Young of Harper and Row Publishing sends this letter to Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent. He explains that he is waiting to send out promotional copies of Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here," until after he receives a list of who Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference have already sent copies. He attaches a list of those sent copies of Dr. King's last book so that they might use it as a checklist, including President Johnson, Vice President Humphrey, Robert F. Kennedy, and Dr.

Letter from Robert S. Swann to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

This letter to Dr. King accompanies the enclosure of a proposal regarding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Co-operative Association. Robert Swann hopes that this proposal can be discussed at the upcoming SCLC meeting in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Edmund Stinnes to MLK

Wednesday, December 9, 1964

Edmund Stinnes reports a recent visit with his and Dr. King's mutual friends Asha Devi and Dr. E. W. Aryanayakam along with news about other acquaintances. He also shares his excitement about an upcoming meeting with Dr. King. He closes by inviting Dr. and Mrs. King to vacation at his farm in Brazil.

Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

Saturday, August 1, 1964

In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

God

Dr. King contextualizes the speed of God.

Thank You Letter from MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

MLK wrote this thank you note to a supporter, Mrs. C.C. White, at a time when some former supporters were worried about a lack of racial unity or SCLC's position against the Vietnam War.

Statement of Royalty Account

Tuesday, June 29, 1965

This financial statement reflects SCLC's affiliation with Motown Record Corporation.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Robert Jacoby

Thursday, July 25, 1963

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Reverend Robert Jacoby for his kind letter concerning his use of the Letter From the Birmingham Jail.

Telegram from President Johnson to MLK

Thursday, June 23, 1966

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to Dr. King sympathizing with his concern over the incidents that occurred in Philadelphia, Mississippi. King was continuing the March Against Fear of James Meredith, who was shot by a sniper on June 6. A rally in Philadelphia commemorating the murder two years earlier of three civil rights activists was angrily attacked by a white mob. Homes of blacks were later sprayed with gunfire.

People in Action: Recognition and Opportunity

Dr. King states there are two basic elements to human rights: recognition and opportunity.

Letter from Silas K. Brown to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Mr. Brown requests the help of Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of Reverend U.S. Gilliam. Reverend Gilliam, the first Negro to run for public office in Grenada, Mississippi, is under attack by whites in his community.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

Letter from MLK to Hugh Daugherty

Thursday, February 22, 1968

In this response letter to Hugh Daugherty, Dr. King extends his deep appreciation for contributions made to the SCLC. The reverend also apologizes for the delay in response.

Request for Help

Monday, November 6, 1967

Marcellus M. Harper requests assistance from Dr. King in relation to economic improvement. In his letter of appeal, Mr. Harper requests that Dr. King speaks on gossip, unity, improving conditions and ways of living, and economic improvement.

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

MLK's Speaking Itinerary

This list of speaking engagements documents Dr. King's busy schedule, in June 1965.

Christian Social Philosophy

Dr. King focuses on the interrelatedness of Christian social philosophy, Christian ethics and theology. He argues for the rejection of theology that has no social ethics and also contends that ethics must be dynamic.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Saturday, April 11, 1964

John Lewis, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and future Congressmen, writes to Dr. King to share his concerns regarding the need for an improved relationship between SNCC and SCLC.

SCLC Pamphlet- Why?

This brochure highlights the various forms of discrimination African Americans faced in Alabama, primarily the legal right to vote. Housing, unemployment, and police brutality are other key topics discussed. There is also a call to action on solutions for these problems.

Letter from Beryl Bugatch to MLK

Sunday, July 25, 1965

Beryl Bugatch of the University of Pennsylvania asks Dr. King to speak on "the governments role in enforcing racial morality."