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Letter from Representative Thomas G. Morris to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

New Mexico Congressman Thomas Morris writes Dr. King to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram requesting Morris' opposition to House Bill 585, which would dismiss five recently elected members. Morris does not indicate his position in the matter.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Mr. Levison Regarding U.S. Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Monday, September 19, 1966

Mr. Levison expresses his support for Representative Powell during the controversial House of Representatives committee chairmanship and ethical dilemma. Levison goes on to defend the suggestion of race being the determining factor of his criticism by volunteering his support of any review of congressional systems.

Sin (Isaiah)

Dr. King highlights the topic of sin, according to the Book of Isaiah.

Resource Teachers

This document lists the eight duties of Resource Teachers, and includes targeted instruction for how this group should interact with base teachers and students.

Letter from Clyde De L. Ryals to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964

Clyde De L. Ryals shares the perspective of his white counterparts in Georgia in congratulating Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Schleiermacher and the Bible

Dr. King references a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher regarding the relationship between religion and sacred texts.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Schleiermacher (Attributes of God)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith."

Integrating Elementary Schools in Berkeley

Thursday, April 20, 1967

This article details the integration of several Berkeley area elementary schools. The Presidents of each school give feedback regarding the public's response and their plans on how they will proceed.

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

Notecard Regarding Freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his insights on the concept of freedom.

Peace and Freedom Party Registration Drive

This document discusses the Peace and Freedom Party Registration Drive and the California Committee for the Peace and Freedom Party. The registration drive aims to place the Peace and Freedom Party on the 1968 California ballot with the purpose of opposing the Democratic and Republican presidential candidates. Also included is a partial list of the Peace and Freedom Party's endorsers, which includes 1962 Nobel Peace Prize recipient Linus Pauling.

Letter from MLK to E. C. Smith

Wednesday, December 19, 1962

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Rev. Smith's invitation to speak at Metropolitan Baptist Church and apologizes for his tardy response. Dr. King discusses the "People-To-People" tour of the south and declines the invitation due to his busy schedule.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Letter from MLK to Madame Bremond

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King writes Madame Bremond to send his heartfelt thanks regarding his visit to Lyons, France. The Reverend follows with expressing his appreciation for Bremond's hospitality and wonderful reception.

Letter from MLK to Cal David Gleaton

Thursday, December 2, 1965

Dr. King thanks Rev. Cal Gleaton for his letter in support of the work of the SCLC. Dr. King tells Gleaton that the letter was uplifting and that his contribution to the morale and the spirit of the freedom movement is mostly appreciated by the staff of the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mamie Reese

Monday, January 22, 1968

Dr. King's assistant writes Mamie Reese to applaud Eartha Kitt's courage in speaking up about what she believes is the cause of “restlessness” and crime in the streets. Kitt spoke out against the Vietnam War at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, the First Lady.

Around The World Pilgrimage Proposal

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

Mr. W Emerson Smith appoints Dr. King and Mr. Abernathy as leaders of a proposed pilgrimage around the world. Mr. Smith outlines the estimated costs and planned itinerary along with profits for the SCLC.

Chicago IL The New Crusader: "The World of Books"

Saturday, June 24, 1967

Under the heading "The World of Books", the New Crusader newspaper published this review of Dr. King's last book. The review touches on Dr. King's examination of the Black Power movement and its effect on racial tension in America.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

An individual finds it insulting that Dr. King is compared to Abraham Lincoln and would like Dr. King to be remembered as a traitor.

Breadbasket Food Chain Sign Contract

Saturday, November 19, 1966

These articles highlight a contract that was signed by High Low Foods Inc. and Operation Breadbasket to increase the number of jobs for Negroes.

Fear

Dr. King quotes John Watson's "Behaviorism" on the two things that incite fear.

Letter from Robert D. Heslep to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

The Philosophy of Education Society, Southeastern Region writes Dr. King giving full moral support in the development of "The Poor People's Washington Campaign."

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in the Old Testament book, Amos.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes from D. Miall Edwards’ “The Philosophy of Religion.” Miall is misspelled on the note card.

Letter from MLK to the Bulstrode School Children

Friday, July 9, 1965

Dr. King thanks the school children of Bulstrode in England for their SCLC contribution by means of their daffodil sales. Outlining the current work of the SCLC, he educates the young supporters on the measures being taken to secure voting rights via "Operation Breadbasket" and "Operation Dialogue."

MLK's Crawfordville, Georgia Speech

Monday, October 11, 1965

Dr. King rallies the people to keep pushing forward with nonviolent actions to gain freedom and dignity as human beings.

The Man Who Was a Fool

The sermon "The Man Who Was a Fool," was published in the June 1961 issue of the journal The Pulpit. Dr. King delivered the sermon in both Chicago and Detroit in early 1961.

From Reverend M. L. Jackson to MLK

Friday, May 4, 1962

Rev. Jackson expresses his appreciation and support for the work of Dr. King. Rev. Jackson pledges his dedication to the cause and encourages Dr. King to continue his monumental work.