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Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites W. K. Wright's "A Student Outline of Philosophy of Religion."

Letter from Kerry Clayton to MLK 11/20/66

Sunday, November 20, 1966

Kerry Clayton informs Dr. King that she was asked to do a third grade report about his life. She also requested for Dr. King to send a picture to include in the report. Kerry Clayton was a resident of China Lake, California.

Eulogy for Robert W. Spike

Dr. King highlights the life and work of American clergyman, theologian, and civil rights leader, Robert W. Spike. Spike was a leader known for mobilizing church participation for the Civil Rights Movement. Less than one year after accepting a professorship at the University of Chicago, he was murdered.

Letter from MLK to Alice Sargent

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak at Temple University from the Assistant Director of Student Activities. He states that he enjoys speaking with college and university students, he gracefully declines the invitation due to his civil rights commitments in the South. He also addresses Mrs. Sargent's question presented in her letter regarding the role Temple University can play in the Civil Rights Movement. He tells her that Rev. C.T. Vivian, Dr.

Telegram from Congressman Charles E. Bennett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Florida Democratic Congressman Charles Bennett informs Dr. King that the Celler Bill does not apply to all states, though he feels that it should. The Celler Bill, introduced by New York Democratic Congressman Emmanuel Celler, would prohibit the purchase of rifles, shotguns and handguns by direct mail.

Letter from MLK to Frank B. Lowell

Monday, October 14, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Frank Lowell's letter regarding the SCLC's current mission. Dr. King briefly explains the nonviolent philosophy, the beliefs of the SCLC, and race relations in America.

Two Poems for MLK

The unknown author writes two poems titled, "A Tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr." and "Time! Time!! Time!!!" One of the poems uses the letters of Dr. King's name for the leading word of each verse.

Telegram from UFT President Albert Shanker to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Albert Shanker expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for his support throughout the tumultuous 1967 education crisis in New York City.

March to Washington Strategic Planning

This document outlines key strategies concerning the upcoming March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963. The one-day civil rights demonstration intends to bring national attention to the social and economic injustices afflicting millions of American citizens.

Letter from Theodore Lozada to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thedore Lozada offers his condolences to Mrs. King after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from John Yungblut to MLK

Monday, January 16, 1961

John Yungblut writes to Dr. King to confirm his ability to lead a seminar for the Atlanta Meeting's Quaker House on the Philosophy and Practice of Non-violence.

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Monday, August 20, 1962

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Letter from Laurie Bush to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Laurie Bush writes to Dr. King requesting information about the Civil Rights Movement for his or her research paper.

Letter from M. L. Banner to MLK

Friday, September 13, 1963

The board of directors of the Booker T. Washington Center, Inc. requests Dr. King to serve as the guest speaker for their annual banquet. The Booker T. Washington Center is the only predominately Negro Welfare Agency in the community.

Letter from Mrs. Elsie Walker to the SCLF

Monday, April 15, 1968

In this letter, Mrs. Elsie Walker mentions the enclosure of $50 given in memory of Dr. King. She also commits her Church's Service Guild to making annual pilgrimages to Dr. King's burial site in order to pay homage to "our Leader."

Daily News: NAACP Anti-South Propaganda Article

Thursday, March 5, 1959

The author writes about a secret meeting that was held at the NAACP's headquarters regarding race identification.

Meister Eckhart

Dr. King outlines a brief history of German mystic philosopher Meister Eckhart.

Letter from Elijah Muhammad to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

In this letter, Elijah Muhammad expresses the importance of black unity in the efforts for equality. Elijah Muhammad requests the presence of Dr. King and other prominent civil rights leaders at a meeting to discuss solutions to the ongoing struggle against injustice.

Letter from MLK to Verna L. Halll

Tuesday, January 29, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Hall and the rest of the Mississippi Club for their donation. He assures her that "good will contributions" are necessary for the work of the SCLC to continue.

Letter from J. B. Hamilton to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1963

J. B. Hamilton expresses gratitude for Dr. King's visit to the Mount Zion Baptist Church in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The Suffering Servant

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 53 presents a different view of the servant from chapters 42, 49 and 50. The concept of God's servant evolved from that of Israel as a nation, to the spiritual or inner Israel, to an individual who would take up the work that the others would not. King concludes that the prophecy was fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth.

Letter from Kathleen Reid to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967

Kathleen Reed, the editor of Alert Catholic, writes to Dr. King enclosing the most recent copy of the publication. The Newsletter of the National Council of Catholic Men features a quote by Dr. King to President Johnson which stated "the conditions which you so bravely set out to remedy when you entered office" have not changed.

Schleiermacher (The Essence of Christianity)

Dr. King writes that Friedrich Schleiermacher describes the essence of Christianity as a belief in Jesus as the origin of the Christian faith and his work as that of redemption.

Letter from Ruth W. Carr to SCLC

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Ruth W. Carr gives a donation of $350.00 on behalf of her late husband, Clarence Carr. Mrs. Carr explains that it was her husband wish before death to contribute to the work of the SCLC.

Letter from Ann Pagenstecher to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Ann Pagenstecher from Harvard College Library offers Dr. King a copy of a bibliography that lists publications, both, by and about him. She shares supportive words with Dr. King, applauding his crusade regardless of the outcome. The attached bibliography contains a brief biography of Dr. King's life and seven pages of literature including books and articles from prominent publications such as Ebony Magazine, The New York Times, and The Christian Century.

A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse

This pamphlet is from Dr. King's undergraduate alma mater, Morehouse College. The President of the institute, Benjamin E. Mays, is the author of , "A Brief Summary of Fifteen Years at Morehouse" which outlines the progress made during his presidency.

Letter from Thein Wah to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Thein Wah expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts in leading peace marches in New York, New York and San Francisco, California.

Humanism

Dr. King quotes Algernon Charles Swinburne's "Hymn of Man" and William Ernest Henley's "Invictus" as representative of humanist thought.

Cloudy Summit

Sunday, January 15, 1967

In this article, Mr. Randolph organizes a conference of Negro leaders to take action in the suspension case of Rep. Adam Clayton Powell.

United Nations Association-Hawaii Chapter

Monday, April 8, 1968

The card, shown here, is an expression of condolence and gratitude from the Hawaii chapter of the United Nations Association, in the form of a "lei of love".