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"ROMANIA"

Letter from Representative James H. Scheuer to MLK

Wednesday, February 24, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Congressman James Scheuer (D-New York) writes Dr. King that he believes progress is finally being made in Selma, Alabama, and he congratulations Dr. Kin on his excellent leadership.

Materialism

Dr. King documents a quote by Robert Flint, a Scottish theologian and philosopher in reference to "materialism" from the "Baird Lectures."

Holiday Letter from the Best Family

In this Christmas Card, the Best Family wishes all of their friends and supporters a Merry Christmas.

Letter from Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Thursday, October 29, 1964
BRAZIL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Hildegard Goss-Mayr, Secretary for the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invites Dr. King to speak at a conference in Brazil.

Pass The Ammunition

Ernie Sheffield voices his opinion on the "Department of War Violence and Brute Force" and the spending of a billion dollars a week on violence. He states that in their spending of valuable money not "even a dime" has been spent on a "Department of Peace, Goodwill and Coexistence."

SCLC Annual Meeting Plans

Thursday, February 1, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Dr. King requests that Reverend Ernest Gibbs extends a love offering to the SCLC. This offering will be presented to the organization at a mass rally in Washington, DC.

Beyond Condemnation

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Beyond Condemnation." He references the biblical story about a woman condemned to death by the Pharisees for adultery. Jesus commands "the person without sin to cast the first stone" as a lesson that all sins are equal and that no one should judge the flaws of others.

Jesus

Dr. King highlights the significant characteristics of Jesus Christ.

People In Action: The School Boycott Concept

Saturday, April 11, 1964
Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King expounds on the effectiveness of school boycotting to combat the issues of de facto segregation. Initially, Dr. King sought boycotting as a creative nonviolent approach to intolerable racial conditions, but he expresses some concern with children involvement in "adult issues" such as civil rights. However, Dr. King states children are affected and since they are the next generation, should partake in the improvement endeavors of the society. The article further details ideologies and methods surrounding the school boycotts.

SCLC President's Report - MLK

Wednesday, August 10, 1966
Jackson, MS, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Illinois (IL), Kentucky (KY), Tennessee (TN), Oregon (OR), Washington (WA), Texas (TX)

Delivered at the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King presents the annual report for the organization. King addresses several elements of the Civil Rights Movement as he discusses the successes, plans, goals, and vision of the SCLC in relation to the wider movement it represents.

Letter from James M. Force to Dora McDonald

Friday, April 28, 1967
Wisconsin (WI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

James M. Force, Public Information Coordinator for the University of Wisconsin, requests that Dr. King consider allowing his speech scheduled for May 12, 1967 be broadcast over the radio. WSAU Radio expresses interest in carrying Dr. King's speech live. WHA Radio, operated by the University of Wisconsin, requests permission to tape the speech for later broadcast.

Dorothy Cotton telegraphs congratulations

Sunday, January 31, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dorothy Cotton, long-time colleague of Dr. King at Southern Christian Leadership Conference, congratulates Dr. King for being nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. Cotton was one of the only non-family members to subsequently accompany Dr. King to Oslo, Norway, for the prize ceremony.

Preliminary Outline for a Conference on Democratic Planning For America

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE

This preliminary outline features a number of keynote dignitaries and leaders who will address a number of economic, labor, and social justice issues during the three-day Conference on Democratic Planning for America.

Letter from Willis M. Tate to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
Dallas, TX

Willis M. Tate, President of Southern Methodist University, expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's acceptance to come to the university. He assures Dr. King that his trip is welcomed and presents two alternative dates to address the student body. This address is part of the 50th Anniversary Celebration that Dr. King has already been invited.

Anabaptists

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding the Anabaptists and the religious philosophy of the group.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John Papandrew

Wednesday, October 10, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), New Hampshire (NH), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King thanks Rev. John Papandrew of New Hampshire for giving witness during the Albany Movement. Dr. King explains that, through the events in Albany, the world is now aware of the situation in the South.

Letter from MLK to Catriona Cole White

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Connecticut (CT)

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Catriona Cole White to thank her for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. He explains that their recent projects have included voter registration in the south.

The Power of Nonviolence

Thursday, May 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Berkeley, CA

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Monday, April 3, 1967
Washington, D.C., Connecticut (CT), SOUTH KOREA, NORTH KOREA, CHINA, VIETNAM, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, JAPAN, FRANCE, GERMANY

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Letter from MLK to David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union

Tuesday, June 16, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King thanks David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union for their thoughtful donation to SCLC. The contribution will be used to assist the SCLC in voter registration, direct action and other methods to combat racial injustice.

Letter from MLK and Albert A. Raby

Monday, July 10, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Albert Raby and Dr. King assert that the Weston project is "a national test case for the integrity of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act." The population of Negroes in DuPage County is extremely low and the jobs would not offer for them an equal opportunity.

Liberalism

Dr. King notes a view of liberalism in Harry Emerson Fosdick’s “The Modern Use of the Bible.”

Letter from William W. Stafford to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

William Stafford expresses admiration, gratitude and support for Dr. King's work with the Civil Rights Movement and his stand against the Vietnam War.

Letter from Reese High School Student to MLK

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
Michigan (MI)

Ann Renwick, a senior at Reese High School, informs Dr. King of a term paper she is writing about him and requests information regarding his next visit to Detroit. She also expresses discontent with prejudices against Negros in her small all-white town, but is determined to change the mentality of her peers.

Response from MLK to Priscilla C. Spagne

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Priscilla C. Spagne for her supportive letter to the Boston Globe. He proclaims that it is important to, "Take every opportunity to make our consciences known to the public."

Letter from Jack Tatum to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 13, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Jack Tatum lets Ms. Dora McDonald know that he will be in Atlanta from November 16th-20th, 1967. He states that he would appreciate a meeting with Dr. King and the SCLC executive staff.

Letter from Malcolm R. La Place II to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1963
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Virginia (VA), Maryland (MD), Pennsylvania (PA), New Orleans, LA

Malcolm La Place of WMAL TV News writes Dr. King regarding his address to the Capital Press Club. He hopes to arrange a videotape session as well.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Sunday, June 23, 1963
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA)

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Letter of Thanks from MLK to Professor & Mrs. De Branges

Monday, February 27, 1967
Indiana (IN)

In this letter, Dr. King expressed appreciation to Professor and Mrs. Louis De Branges for a generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Chicago IL The New Crusader: "The World of Books"

Saturday, June 24, 1967
Chicago, IL

Under the heading "The World of Books", the New Crusader newspaper published this review of Dr. King's last book. The review touches on Dr. King's examination of the Black Power movement and its effect on racial tension in America.