The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:

Letter from Jack Krieger to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Jack Krieger requests a reprint of Dr. King's speech delivered at the Riverdale Church in New York on the topics of peace and the Vietnam War.

Letter from David E. McGuire to All Members of First Westminster Presbyterian Church

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

The Session of the First Westminster Presbyterian Church, Yonkers, NY urges a "write-in" campaign to federal, state, or municipal legislators requesting action in the areas of open housing, equal employment opportunities and civil rights.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. Spock, pediatrician and Vietnam anti-war activist, writes Dr. King to enlist his support for an anti-war effort by joining in a "statement of common concern" with other "key spokesman for major American interests and institutions." He proposes that the group hold a press conference to release the statement with the intention of encouraging collective action against the Vietnam War. Dr. Spock indicates that he would like to hold the press conference on March 7, 1966. Dr. Spock hopes the group can get an audience with President Johnson to discuss their concerns.

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Sunday, June 25, 1967

In this letter, Joseph Clark shows appreciation for the work Dr. King has done.

Letter from Harris Wofford to MLK and Ralph Abernathy

Saturday, November 30, 1957

Harris Wofford, civil rights supporter and friend of Dr. King, proposes "the right next step" for King and the Montgomery Improvement Association. He suggests round-table conferences composed of white and Negro ministers, an idea inspired by the efforts of Gandhi.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites W. K. Wright's "A Student Outline of Philosophy of Religion."

Postcard from Jacksonville Beach

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This postcard to Dr. King requesting an autograph is one printed by the Jacksonville Beach, Florida Chamber of Commerce.

Telegram from MLK to Edward M. Kennedy

Dr. King expresses his gratification to Senator Edward M. Kennedy for sponsoring the amendment to abolish the poll tax in state elections.

Letter from Barry Diamond to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Barry Diamond, Chairman of Choice 68 at the University of Florida, informs Dr. King that his name will be on the ballot and invites him to speak at the University. Diamond explains that Choice 68 is "a national collegiate presidential primary sponsored by Time Magazine."

Registration for the Annual Youth Retreat

Friday, May 12, 1967

This is a document from Reverend Earl Stirewalt with information on the annual Youth Retreat of the Georgia Baptist Convention. The retreat aims to aid in the spiritual growth of young men and women.

Letter to the Public of Montgomery, Alabama

The ministerial leaders of Montgomery address the problems of discrimination and segregation within the city's bus system. The ministers form a plan of action to eliminate such practices and attain a equal society for all.

Advice for Living

Advice for Living is a column Dr. King uses to help people with moral dilemmas. In this issue, he receives questions from an 18-year old about his mother's drinking issues, a 24-year old with relationship issues, and others.

"Black Power" and Coalition Politics

The September 1966 issue of Commentary, a monthly publication of the American Jewish Committee, features Bayard Rustin's article "Black Power and Coalition Politics." The article discusses topics such as black power, the liberal labor civil rights coalition, the strategies of Marcus Garvey, W. E. B. Du Bois, and Booker T. Washington, and A. Philip Randolph's Freedom Budget. Rustin states that although black power is viewed as a "psychological rejection of white supremacy" those advocating for black power are seeking a "new black establishment."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Shaefer that Dr. King will be able to speak in Kennett Square in Pennsylvania.

Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

Tuesday, December 1, 1959

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

Spring Mobilization Committee Information Sheets

These information sheets concern the Spring Mobilization Committee's rally taking place within the United Nations. Topics discussed include meals, housing, and child safety.

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.

Letter from Julia Smith to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1962

Julia Smith asks Dr. King to pray for her because she wants to study nursing at Michigan State University, a predominately white school at the time. She also reminds Dr. King of their previous encounter in St. Louis, Missouri where she shook his hand.

The People Speak

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

The neighborhood residents initiate a self-reliant program entitled, "Self-Help Policy-67 Model", due to the inadequacies within the federal government's Anti-poverty Program and the War on Poverty Program. These individuals are considered "The New Breed" and are working to cease their economic disparities. They correlate the biblical story of Nicodemus to associate the promised land of economic freedom.


Dr. King notes the problem of evil from the viewpoint of the Stoics.

MLK Memorandum on SCLC Direct Action Plans

In this confidential memorandum, Dr. King outlines SCLC’s direct action program for Birmingham, Alabama and Danville, Virginia. For each community, he states the challenges, defines goals, and then provides detailed steps to be taken and also staff assignments. He promises to outline his plan for Montgomery, Alabama in a few days.

Atlanta Dinner Honoring MLK Nobel Peace Prize

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

The Citizens of Atlanta host a "recognition dinner" honoring Dr. King as the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize recipient. This document is an autographed copy of the dinner program.

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Democracy

On this handwritten notecard, Dr. King outlines Ralph Barton Perry's views on Democracy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Canon Hugh Monteflore

Thursday, January 21, 1965

Dr. King declines Canon Hugh Montefiore invitation to speak at the University Church in Cambridge, England due to his pastoral duties at his own church.


Dr. King records a quote on righteousness from Karl Barth's "The Epistle to the Romans."

Thank You Letter from Mary Keller to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

This letter from Mary Keller to Dr. King thanks him for his speech given at Grosse Pointe High School on March 14, 1968. Keller apologizes for the behavior of some "troublemakers" during the event.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to John H. Bustamente

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Chauncey Eskridge elaborates on the financial details associated with the Belafonte Benefit Concerts. He also requests some help in overcoming the deficit created by the concert.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Monday, September 25, 1967

Telegram from Duncan Wood on behalf of the Oslo Committee, hoping to arrange interviews in Moscow with Dr. King and Father Pire.

People to People: The Law is Majestic

Saturday, July 31, 1965

Dr. King pays homage to the numerous lawyers of the Civil Rights Movement and asserts that the one unifying belief among lawyers is the idea that "law is majestic and the judicial process is supreme." Dr. King supports this claim with a story about his Negro lawyers successfully winning a case in Birmingham with an all-white jury.