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"RUSSIAN FEDERATION"

What Martin Luther King Really Has on His Mind

Sunday, July 9, 1967

The Detroit Free Press reviewed Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review examines Dr. King's stance on the slogan "Black Power," his disappointment with moderation and his views against the Vietnam War. According to Dr. King, "The bombs in Vietnam explode at home; they destroy the hopes and possibilities for a decent America."

MLK Sermon: Non-Conformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King delivers this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist church in Atlanta, Georgia. He references the statement Representative Julian Bond made regarding the Vietnam War and discusses the responsibility of Christians to be morally noble instead of socially respectable. He references multiple biblical figures and explains the importance of not conforming to society.

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs.Rousseau

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs. Rousseau was about his views on Vietnam. He believed that America's involvement in Vietnam was wrong and that the United States was on the wrong side of peace.

Letter from David Kairys to MLK and SCLC

Saturday, June 17, 1967

Mr. Kairys writes Dr. King to express his support of Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam War as well as Dr. King's approach to civil rights issues.

Letter from Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld to MLK

Thursday, March 8, 1962

Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld writes to Dr. King asking him to participate in a "Social Action Forum," in Cleveland, Ohio.

Memo to SCLC Contributors

This memo from the SCLC Staff highlights political activity taking place in Louisville, Kentucky, Blue Ridge, Georgia, and Cleveland, Ohio. The organization had used the energy from demonstrations to fuel voter registration campaigns. They share stories of collaborations and success that have resulted from their efforts.

Dr. King Acceptance as an Honorary Member of Wellesley College

Dr. King often had delayed responses due to his strenuous schedule, traveling obligations, and completion of the necessary duties as the President of the SCLC. Dr. King's letter to Miss Knight provides an example of the unintentional unpunctuality as he accepts an award as an honorary member of Wellesley College class of 1966.

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

Schleiermacher (Religion as Contemplation)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from MLK to Audrey Mizer

Friday, December 29, 1961

Dr. King addresses Audrey Mizer's concerns regarding his position on "admitting Red China to the United Nations." He explains that he realizes the sensitivity of this topic but feels that the issue must be tackled in a realistic manner.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration Reception

The Distinguished Hospitality Committee of the Inaugural Committee invite Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a reception preceding the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Postcard From Jesse Jackson to MLK

Jesse Jackson doubts that Dr. King will be able to bring God to Albany, Georgia.

Man

Dr. King writes his thoughts on man.

Background Paper on the Student Sit-in Protest Movement

The Division of Racial Minorities and the Division of Christian Citizenship of the National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church give some background information on the "sit-in protest movement" and list three points in summary.

Statement from MLK Regarding Albany Movement

Wednesday, August 1, 1962

While serving a forty-five day sentence alongside Ralph D. Abernathy, Dr. King releases a statement expressing his appreciation for President Kennedy's support of the Albany Movement.

Proposed Nobel Speech

This is a draft for an optional version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. He notes the importance of viewing the world as a family and with such perception, understands race issues as an international concern. King also speaks of Sir Alfred Bernhard Nobel, the originator of the Nobel Peace Prize. He accepts the award on behalf of those who came before him and those who continue to fight for freedom.

Royalty Statement for a Payot Published Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement for a French-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" documents royalties earned in 1966.

The Powell Affair - A Crisis of Morals ad Faith

Monday, February 6, 1967

The National Committee of Negro Churchmen express disapproval regarding the unseating of Adam Clayton Powell as Representative of the 18th Congressional District of New York, and Chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee. The organization issues a call to Congress and the Democratic Caucus for Powell's re-instatement.

Statement on Warnings Issued by U Thant

Sunday, May 21, 1967

On behalf of Secretary General of the United Nations U Thant, this letter serves as a call to action for every government, organization, and organ of world opinion to take a firm stance against American military escalation in the Vietnam conflict.

Letter from Laura Lofferty to SCLC

Friday, April 5, 1968

Laura Lofferty writes to the leadership of SCLC expressing sympathy for the death of Dr. King.

Letter to Monsier Sempe from Joan Daves

Thursday, October 17, 1963

This is a letter stating that Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail" cannot be used in any books because Dr. King wants it to appear in his own book first and it cannot be used before a French version of that book becomes available. Any translation and duplication of his letter violates copyright laws.

Letter from MLK to Donna Mitchell

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a previous letter sent by Donna Mitchell. He shares the gratification of knowing that young people are aware of "the changing world in which we live." King concludes by stating that correspondence from youth is always welcomed.

Letter to MLK from Rev. A.D. King

Monday, April 2, 1962

Dr. King's brother, Rev. A.D. Williams King, wrote this letter to Dr. King, thanking him for his participation, at the First Baptist Church Installation Services in Birmingham.

Letter from Pennsylvania State University to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 22, 1965

Nina C. Brown writes Dora McDonald on behalf of Pennsylvania State University to thank her for arranging Dr. King's trip to the school.

Letter from Joani Kalmers to MLK

Saturday, July 15, 1967

Joani Kalmers, a senior at Thiel College, requests information from Dr. King and the SCLC regarding her thesis topic "Christianity and the Negro."

Letter of Support from Sara Mitchell to MLK

Sunday, June 11, 1967

A member from the Board of Education of the City of Atlanta congratulates Dr. King on his article in the "Progressive" taken from "Where Do We Go from Here?" She also informs Dr. King that she is taking the article to the school board.

Letter from Mike Van Ryan to Reverend Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mike Van Ryn addresses this correspondence to Rev. Ralph Abernathy with an enclosure of $20 for the work of SCLC.

Letter from Bill Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, January 5, 1966

William Bennett offers the suggestion that the phrase "dark skinned" be used to describe people of color. Bennett encountered the phrase while on a trip in Bermuda, and realized he should enforce the idea that skin color does not determine American citizenship.

Letter from MLK to Joseph Lowery

Friday, November 11, 1966

Dr. King discloses possible discrepancies made by Hosea Williams. He further proposes individuals to investigate the allegations brought against Mr. Williams.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, the Executive Secretary of Hadley Executive Committee of the Kennett Consolidated School, contacts Ms. McDonald in an attempt to reschedule an event cancelled by Dr. King.