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Letter from MLK to Dr. Rubio

Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Dr. King attempts to guide Dr. Rubio to resources that will be helpful in his new endeavors.


Dr. King quotes William James' "The Sentiment of Rationality" on faith.

Letter from Willie Gate Forest to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Willie Gate Forest writes Dr. King requesting his assistance after being wrongly accused of a crime he claims to have not committed. He stresses that he remains in jail despite another person confessing to the crime.

Importance of the Public Accommodations Section of the Civil Rights Bill

Atlanta, GA

This document features a story of a white civil rights worker who was fined and sentence to jail because she sought to eat with her Negro friends in a restaurant in Atlanta.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Geiser

Dr. King offers praise and support to Mrs. Geiser for her efforts to teach her children tolerance in the face of bigotry and racial hatred.

Homeric Problem

Dr. King briefly outlines the problem surrounding the work of the Greek poet Homer. The note card references the view of German scholar and critic Friedrich August Wolf and documents two primary theories regarding Homeric literature.

Letter from Unitarian Universalist Association President Dana McLean Greeley to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965
Massachusetts (MA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Dana McLean Greeley asks for Dr. King's endorsement of a conference on religion and peace to be held in Washington, DC, and invites Dr. King to serve on the Executive Committee of the conference. Greeley also recounts his time spent in Selma and mentions that he will be in Montgomery soon.

Telegram from Newcastle University to MLK

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

The registrar of Newcastle University inquires if Dr. King would be able to accept an honorary degree from the institute.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.

March on Washington

Sunday, April 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., Little Rock, AR, North Carolina (NC), New York (NY), New York, NY, Missouri (MO)

In this news release, Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, addresses Congress to voice the people's concern in their quest for freedom, jobs and equal rights. He commends Republicans and Democrats in support of legislation to end discrimination.

Congratulations Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, January 14, 1964
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Governor Nelson Rockefeller extends best wishes to Dr. King on his birthday and congratulates him for being honored as the Man-of-the Year.

Letter from Roland Gammon to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963
New York, NY

Roland Gammon requests an interview with Dr. King for a sequel to Faith Is A Star, a book about the role faith has played in the lives of prominent Americans. The sequel will focus on world leaders.

Royalty Statement for MLK from Joan Daves

New York, NY

In this royalty statement, Joan Daves provides a detailed report of earnings for the British edition of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."


Dr. King cites philosopher and theologian Paul Tillich's definition of individualization. He explains, "it is implied in and constitutive of every self, which means that at least in an analogous way it is implied in and constitutive of every being."

Letter from Clair M. Cook to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Washington, D.C., Indiana (IN), Ohio (OH)

Mr. Cook, legislative assisant to Senator Hartke of Indiana, thanks Dr. King for his recent letter lauding Senator Hartke for supporting the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Cook also recalls his and Dr. King's experience at Boston University.

Congratulatory Telegram to Thurgood Marshall from MLK

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King congratulates Thurgood Marshall on being appointed to the US Supreme Court. Dr. King also emphasizes that Marshall's position is a major advancement towards a color-blind society.

Letter from Richard C. Gilman to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, November 14, 1966
Los Angeles, CA

Richard C. Gilman is pleased that Dr. King has accepted the speaking engagement located at Occidental College and informs Miss McDonald of the honorarium he will be receiving.

Telegram from Paul Deitrich to John Lewis

Sunday, March 21, 1965
Washington, D.C., Selma, AL

Paul Deitrich commends John Lewis for his speech in Washington and urges him to contact him whenever he is in Washington again. He also wants to express a much-delayed apology.

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Atlanta, GA, New Hampshire (NH), GERMANY

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

Letter from Kenyan Student to MLK

Monday, March 5, 1962

A student writes Dr. King expressing support for his movement and social views in regards to Civil Rights.

Letter from MLK to Rev. William A. Dennis

Monday, January 20, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN

Dr. King requests the presence of Reverend Dennis at a SCLC Executive Board meeting in Atlanta, GA. Reverend Dennis responds by stating he will not be able to attend, but he will send someone in his place.

Letter from President Johnson to MLK on Assuming Presidency

Monday, December 2, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

President Johnson writes Dr. King thanking him for his sympathetic telegram as he assumes the Presidency and assures him that he will continue the fight for civil rights initiated by President Kennedy.

Letter From Carl H. Pforzheimer to MLK

Friday, June 30, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Pforzheimer expresses his appreciation for an inscribed copy of one of Dr. King's books.

People in Action: Recognition and Opportunity


Dr. King states there are two basic elements to human rights: recognition and opportunity.

Letter from MLK to Art Simmons

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King extends his gratitude to Mr. Simmons for the evening at the Palais des Sports.

Meet the Press

Sunday, August 21, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., NIGERIA, California (CA)

This transcript of a special 90-minute edition of NBC’s Meet the Press features Dr. King and other prominent Negro civil rights leaders discussing the topics of war, nonviolence, integration, unemployment and black power. The program was aired on radio and television.

Letter from William H. Booth to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Commission on Human Rights Chairman William Booth invites Dr. King and a designated representative to a conference in New York entitled, "Testing Human Potential - New Techniques for Selecting Employees from Minority Groups."

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968
Iowa (IA)

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."

MLK Speaker's Contract

Monday, April 3, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Wisconsin (WI)

This Speakers Bureau Contract states that Dr. King has a speaking engagement on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966
Washington, D.C.

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.