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Letter from Ronald F. Jockers and Ronald Schlossman to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Ronald Jockers and Ronald Schlossman write Dr. King inviting him to participate in the National Collegiate Presidential Primary Choice of 1968.

Letter from MLK to Sarah Harvey

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

Dr. King expresses gratitude for the financial and moral support provided by Sarah Harvey. Dr. King states he is sending a copy of "Stride Toward Freedom" as a token of his appreciation.

Telegram from Philip Lenud to MLK

Sunday, December 18, 1966
New York, NY

Mr. Philip Lenud sent this 1966 Western Union telegram to Dr. King regarding a communication matter with Andrew Young.

Letter from Sampson Oliver to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Sampson Oliver writes Dr. King expressing his feelings concerning the immoral notion of Vietnam War.

Letter from Rembert Stokes to MLK

Monday, December 16, 1963
Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH

The President of Wilberforce University anticipates Dr. King's speech before a delegation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Rembert Stokes also notes that Dr. King would receive a donation following his address, to help support the civil rights movement. Stokes wishes that Dr. King's message would center around the AME church leadership's involvement in the freedom struggle.

Letter from Ludmila Van Sombeek to MLK Regarding Holy Land Pilgrimage

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
North Carolina (NC), ISRAEL

Ludmila Van Sombeek wrote this letter to Dr. King, encouraging him to visit Mount Carmel in Haifa, Israel, during his upcoming visit to the Holy land. She writes that Haifa is home to a shrine to the martyr prophet of the Baha'i Faith.

Letter from MLK to Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxiliary Members Expresing Thanks for Their Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967
Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA

Dr. King thanks the Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxilary Members for their generous contribution to S.C.L.C. Dr. King acknowledges the impact of such support on improving race relations throughout the nation.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

In the 3rd installment of "The Martin Luther King Column," Dr. King praises the Jewish people for seeking freedom for all. Dr. King discusses their contributions to "philanthropy and social organization."

Operation Breadbasket: A Statement by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

Dr. King announces an agreement made with Pick-n-Pay Supermarkets that will open numerous jobs for the Negro community. The

Tour Itinerary to Stockholm, Sweden in Connection with 1964 Nobel Peace Prize Awards

Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, DENMARK, NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, New York (NY), New York, NY, FRANCE, London, England, UNITED KINGDOM

This document contains a tour itinerary for Dr. King's visit to Oslo, Norway from Henderson Travel Service.

Letter from Melvin Brisk to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Melvin Brisk, President of Quadrangle Books, requests that Dr. King read Clarence Darrow's book "Verdicts Out of Court." Brisk acknowledges Dr. King's limited time schedule and urges him to pursue a meeting with Darrow to discuss his publication.


Dr. King documents a J.B. Pratt quote from "What is Pragmatism."


Dr. King finds the best description of the unknowable nature of immortality in the New Testament of the Bible. It is a fragment of 1 Corinthians 2:9 regarding heaven.

The Road to Freedom


This draft of Dr. King's "The Road to Freedom" speech explains "there is nothing more powerful in all the world than an idea whose time has come." He further states that the time has indeed come for the ideas of human dignity and freedom.

Letter from Harry B. Henderson Jr. to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM

Harry Henderson writes Dr. King in support of Dr. King's stance on Vietnam. Henderson expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's "clearout and moving" speech regarding the United State's presence in Vietnam and he feels that only clergymen can take an effective stance. He also discusses how the Vietnam War is used as a scapegoat to keep the government from having to deal with discrimination issues in America.

Letter from Harry Walker to Dora McDonald

Monday, September 25, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New Jersey (NJ)

Harry Walker writes Dora McDonald regarding contracts for Dr. King's future speaking engagements.

Telegram from MLK to Jesse Hill

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
Missouri (MO)

Dr. King sends condolences to Jesse Hill regarding the loss of his grandmother.

Letter from Richard Sand to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Richard Sand, of the New York Vietnam Summer, requested that Dr. King forward autographed photographs to the New York office.

Letter from Rev. O. L. Westley to Local Board

Massachusetts (MA)

In this undated letter, Rev. Westley writes to the "Local Board" on the behalf of Mr. Stanley Howard, who is claiming status as a conscientious objector after being called to serve "in the Armed Service" [sic].

Operation Breadbasket Food Store Agreement

Chicago, IL

Economic conditions begin to change as High-Low Foods and the ministers of Operation Breadbasket team up to provide better opportunities for African Americans.

Letter from Solomon Mendelson to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 5, 1968
New York (NY)

Solomon Mendelson writes to Dora McDonald to inform her that the "I Have A Dream" speech will be televised and that the Congregation of Beth Sholom will be taking action in seeing that it is properly promoted.

Letter from Stacti L. Hourley to MLK

Washington, D.C.

In this document, the Academic Vice President of Howard University requests an essay from Dr. King, on the occasion of his Gandhi Memorial Address. The writer further requests an autographed picture.

Letter from MLK to Anna Frank

Monday, May 7, 1956
New York, NY

Dr. King informs Mrs. Frank, assistant to Dr. Chalmers, of his travel arrangements to New York where he is set to speak at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund dinner.

Letter from Joseph Derman to MLK

Tuesday, March 16, 1965
New Jersey (NJ)

Joseph Derman sends Dr. King a financial contribution to "the great cause." He sends the contribution in memory of the civil rights workers who have passed away.

Letter from Lucy Melhuish to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968
California (CA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Lucy A. Melhuish requests Dr. King's assistance in acquiring copies of speeches from the Poor People's March on Washington. Ms. Melhuish is a graduate student working on her doctorate degree at California State College.

Letter from Dr. King to anonymous

In a handwritten draft addressed simply to "gentleman," Dr. King expressed gratitude for having received a copy of a study entitled "Civil Disobedience: Morality and the Coming of the Civil War." So impressed with the contents of the book, Dr. King made it available to staff as reference resource.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Regarding Tax Forms

Tuesday, November 15, 1966

Joan Daves forwards a set of tax forms related to the German edition of "Stride Toward Freedom".

Telegram from Robert L. Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Robert L. Lucas, the Chairman of the Chicago branch for the Congress On Racial Equality, invites Dr. King and his staff to return to Chicago, Illinois to assist in the struggle for quality integrated education.

Letter From William S. Minor to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), Selma, AL

William S. Minor writes Dr. King thanking him for responding to a personal invite regarding research on racial revolution.

Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.