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Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. E. A. Larson

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Dora McDonald notifies Mrs. E. Larson of Dr. King's absence and informs her that he has never been to Russia, but has no objection to a visit there.

Letter from Victor J. Schoenbach to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967

Victor Schoenbach writes Dr. King expressing his support for Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War in the midst of dissenters.

Letter from Cleonia and Frank to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1960

Cleonia and Frank, of Montgomery, Alabama, convey their support to Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

Letter from Dennis Askey to Dora McDonald Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Tuesday, November 24, 1964

Dennis Askey from the United States Information Agency sends Dora McDonald a detailed itinerary of the award ceremony for the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

In this letter, dated March 9, 1965, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays requests Dr. King's attendance at the annual Morehouse College Board of Trustees meeting.

Correspondence from Maude L. Ballou to Miss Frehse - Apr 29, 1960

Friday, April 29, 1960

Here Maude L. Ballou is responding to Miss Frehse letter concerning questions about MLK's book "Stride Towards Freedom." Miss Ballou states that MLK's time schedule is too full to respond to her questions.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Walters to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Walters of Stone Mountain, Georgia congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Sunday, August 6, 1967

William Kivi forwards Dr. King a copy of a postcard addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The correspondence alleges that the riots occuring in urban cities are a result of a economic stronghold to keep, in Kivi's view, "oppressing the oppressed." Kivi uses an example of California Governor Ronald Reagan's proposal to nix any federal program that supplements the War on Poverty.

Letter from Jacob Hoffman to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965

Jacob Hoffman, principal of M. Hall Stanton Public School, requests that Dr. King record on a tape a few inspirational words for the graduating sixth grade class. Mr. Hoffman, also, mentions a new project called the, "New Dimensions Project," which is to inspire students to achieve higher standards.

Gray Power

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

This sketch was originally sent to Dr. King from John McClellan along with a letter that titled the sketch, "Gray Power."

Semi-Arianism

Dr. King records a definition of semi-Arianism.

Report of A Participant

This report illustrates the authors concern and outlook on the Vietnam war.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Hasselvander

Dr. King writes Mr. Hasselvander hoping to resolve some issues from recent events of injustice and inequality that occurred in Hasselvander's life.

Letter from MLK to Tharon Stevens

Dr. King responds to Mr. Stevens' previous letter and commends his courageous efforts for implementing the 1964 Civil Rights Act in Statesboro. An application to develop an SCLC affiliate in Statesboro is also enclosed.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William S. Thompson

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to William Thompson's letter inviting Dr. King to address the National Bar Association. She explains that Dr. King's calendar shows that he will not be able to attend the event due to his travels.

Letter from Andrew W. Loewi to MLK

Saturday, October 28, 1967

Andrew W. Loewi writes Dr. King concerning his participation in attempting to put an end to the Vietnam War.

Third Level (Cont.)

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

The Man Who Knows: General Westmoreland on Vietnam

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

This editorial from a New York newspaper features statements from General William C. Westmoreland arguing for the public's support "about what is going on in Viet Nam, and why." Dr. King is among those listed as having opposing viewpoints towards the War.

Letter from Sharon Drebert to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968

Sharon Drebert communicates with Dr. King about submitting information for the 'Choice 68' campaign. She asks that Dr. King submit any campaign literature before April 23, 1968. Dr. King would be assassinated on April 4, 1968.

Letter from Grace Newman to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Ms. Grace Newman, National Chairman of the Fort Hood Three Defense Committee, informs Rev. Abernathy of her support of his leadership in SCLC. In honor of her pledge to Dr. King, she promises to continue working to organize poor communities in Puerto Rico.

Letter of Thanks from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Monday, February 25, 1963

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College, expresses appreciation to Dr. King for financial support to the college.

Letter from Clarence Henry to Robert F. Kennedy

Friday, February 2, 1962

Clarence Henry requests the immediate surveillance of Fred Shuttleworth's home by Kennedy's office in lieu of Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth's arrest.

Letter from MLK to Vance Hartke Regarding Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Vance Hartke's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Schleiermacher (The Church and State)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.

Letter from Thomas H. Rogers to MLK

Saturday, February 11, 1967

On Race Relations Sunday, Thomas H. Rogers writes this letter to express his brotherhood and prayers for Dr. King. Emphasizing that one live a life acceptable to God, Rogers believes that God, not man, makes the only judgement. Though of a different race than Dr. King, Rogers sees Dr. King as his brother in Christ and encourages him to do God's biding.

Incarnation

Here, Dr. King notes that the problem of Jesus' Incarnation "boils down to" one single question.

Telegram from Ike Knight to MLK

Ike Knight notifies Dr. King about civil rights issues concerning steel workers going on strike.