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"Rhode Island (RI)"

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to S. I. Hayakawa

Tuesday, July 30, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes S. I. Hayakawa, academic and political figure of Japanese ancestry, informing him that the SCLC is not a tax-exempt organization. Walker says that because it is not tax exempt they are free to do as they please, and he directs Hayakawa on where to send future contributions.

Letter to Dr. Mays Regarding United Negro College Fund

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Dr. King's secretary sends a check for $150 to Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays for the United Negro College Fund. The letter states that Dr. King's pledge will total $700 with the balance paid on or before February 18, 1967.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Pamphlet

This pamphlet promotes the historic March on Washington of August 28, 1963. The pamphlet calls upon Congress to pass civil rights legislation and end the "twin evils of discrimination and economic deprivation" that plague the nation.

Letter from Alice Parham to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Ms. Palhom writes to Dr. King requesting an autograph and personal information about him for her government class.

Adverse Letter about Adam Clayton Powell

An anonymous author asserts that Adam Clayton Powell is not a good leader and he "got in the limelight as he has done by filth."

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Sunday, August 27, 1967

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Letter from George A. Wiley to Rev. Andrew Young

Monday, March 25, 1968

George A. Wiley writes Reverend Andrew Young and other staff of the SCLC regarding National Welfare Rights Organization's (NWRO) participation with the Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Harl Douglass to MLK and the SCLC

Wednesday, March 9, 1966

Harl Douglass writes in disgust at the position Dr. King has taken on Vietnam War. As a once full supporter of the civil rights movement, he believes that Dr. King "is somewhat unstable and he has made millions of enemies for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference....." Douglass warns Dr. King and SCLC officials that if they continue to go down the same track they will lose support of white moderates.

Letter from Local 89 Members to Martin Luther King, Jr.

In this letter dated March 5, 1968, the Anti-Discrimination and Civil Rights Committee of Local 89 invites King to speak at their membership meeting on April 1, 1968. Albert Jenkins, Emil Ramirez, and Wendell are the members of Local 89 who sent this letter.

The United Ministries

The prayer ask for God to help people become stronger in Christ while saving them from the evil and violence within the world.

Letter from Bryn Mawr College to MLK

Monday, May 30, 1966

Bryn Mawr College commends Dr. King for his recent "forceful" presentation that impressed those in attendance at the institution.

Letter from Mount Olive Baptist Church to the SCLC

Saturday, October 5, 1963

The Mount Olive Baptist Church of Sharpsburg express their appreciation and support of the SCLC's nonviolent movement. The church encloses a check and hopes that the organization will maintain clarity in the progression of a "true democracy."

Receipt for Sigrid L. Sharp

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $100 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Mary Sarvis. Dr. King makes reference to an enclosed receipt of the contribution.

Condolence Letter Regarding Assassination of MLK

Monday, April 8, 1968

Anabella Anderson discusses the sadness that she feels over Dr. King's assassination. She says that she grieves for his family and the conditions that brought about Dr. King's death. Ashamed of her white skin, she blames the white race for social ills. Ms. Anderson wants to give of her self to non-whites in America and those under white domination in Africa. Though saddened, she is comforted by the words she heard at Dr. King's funeral and is hopeful that his legacy will live on.

Letter from Don Dickson to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964

A representative of the New Zealand Baptist Theological College invites Dr. King to write an article for their 1965 college magazine.

Telegram from John P. O'Rourke to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

John P. O'Rourke writes Dr. King to express his support of the Southern Baptist Convention.

Why We Can't Wait Title

This document is a portion of a newspaper that contains the title "Why We Cant Wait" by Martin Luther King Jr.

Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.

The Denver Post Reprint "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shaby Clothes"

Thursday, January 25, 1962

In this reprint, of the Denver Post article, entitled "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shabby Clothes", the reader learns that a 13 year old boy did not go to school because he was ashamed by his clothes. The Colorado judge responded with an attempt to get the boy new clothes and reinstated in school.

Telegram from Dr. F. Earl McLendon to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965

Dr. McLendon, President of the Atlanta Medical Association, offers aid to Dr. King and the people of Selma, Alabama after incidents of police brutality.

Letter from Charles Wallace to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Charles Wallace, a retired white high school teacher from California, offers his support to Dr. King for the implementation of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. Wallace emphasizes that he has been a faithful supporter and participant in the civil rights movement. Wallace proposes to assist in the mobilization efforts to structure the campaign.

MLK on Christian Love

In this statement, Dr. King corrects "what may be a false impression." King states that while he does discuss the Christian way of love and non-violence as a tool to unify blacks in the Movement, integration is still necessary in order to truly obtain change.

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee presents The Sound of Freedom to "demonstrate Philadelphia unity" where Dr. King is the guest speaker.

Letter from Martha D. Kennedy to Ralph Abernathy

Wednesday, November 27, 1963

Mrs. Kennedy thanks Rev. Abernathy for the SCLC annual financial report and praises its contents. She also encloses a financial contribution and money for a copy of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

SCLC News Release - MLK Statement on Continued Racial Violence in Alabama

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

This 1966 SCLC news release contains a statement from Dr. King concerning further racial violence in Birmingham, Alabama and the need for prompt action.

Carbon Copy Letter from Dr. King to Joan Daves Regarding rights of "Strength To Love"

Tuesday, May 26, 1964

In this letter, Dr. King acknowledges that he is in receipt of Joan Daves letter about the schedule on June 8, as well as, the letter concerning the offer for the Japanese rights of "Strength To Love".

Man

Dr. King notes that the psalmist’s view of man in Psalms 12:1 seems to indicate that there are no longer godly men.

Letter to Franklin D. Roosevelt Regarding Discrimination In Employment

In this letter, Fred Poellnitz writes Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding his inability to obtain a job with the U.S. government. He claims that it is due to discrimination in employment.

Ontology

Dr. King poses the ontological question "What is being itself?" and quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Bartley to MLK

Dr. King was sent this telegram from a couple who had recently heard him speak, prior to his nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem.