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Advertisement for Mrs. King's Upcoming Appearance

Atlanta, GA

This flyer serves as an advertisement for Mrs. Coretta Scott King's upcoming public appearance at the First African Baptist Church. Mrs. King wishes to honor every Freedom Fighter who was imprisoned during a civil rights demonstration.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, October 9, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Joan Daves sends Dr. King a royalty statement for "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength To Love."

Telegram from Kenneth O'Donnell of the White House to MLK

Wednesday, June 19, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Kenneth O'Donnell sends this telegram to Dr. King encouraging the Reverend to attend a meeting with the President of the United States and several other Civil Rights leaders.

Worship

Dr. King compares and contrasts God's place in the Catholic and Protestant church.

Telegram from John Moore to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967
Boston, MA

John Moore questions Dr. King's Vietnam stance by suggesting that it harms the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter From A. S. Raman to MLK

Thursday, December 8, 1966
INDIA, Indiana (IN)

In this letter, Raman invites Dr. King to be a part of a discussion in the anniversary issue of the Indian Republic by contributing about 800 to the article.

Letter from MLK to Rev. James A. Shiflett

Tuesday, October 9, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King conveys his appreciation to Reverend Shiflett of Chicago for his involvement in and support of the Albany Movement.

Zephaniah and Knowledge

Dr. King places the biblical prophet Zephaniah historically and cites Zephaniah 3:12 and 3:17 on knowledge received from God.

MLK Press Statement After Receiving Nobel Prize

Thursday, December 17, 1964
Oslo, Norway, London, England, Stockholm, Sweden, FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL)

Dr. King issued this statement to the press upon return from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in Norway. In addition to declaring how he plans to distribute his prize winnings, Dr. King discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

"One Solitary Life"

The document, shown here, contains a narrative describing Jesus, entitled "One Solitary Life." Dr. King would use this narrative, in one of his last and most famous sermons "The Drum Major Instinct." The sermon was delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, February 4, 1968, exactly two months before his untimely assassination.

Letter from Alice Murphy to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Alice Murphy informs Dr. King that she is considering writing a segment about the current situation in Alabama. It is necessary that she speak directly with him, as she does not want to say anything "without some degree of personal knowledge."

Letter from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1968
NIGERIA, New York, NY

Roy Wilkins, of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, wrote Dr. King to explain his increasing concern over the violence in Nigeria. Wilkins requests Dr. King's presence for a meeting with Nigerian Leaders to discuss the possibilities of ending the hostilities.

Symbolism and the Cross

Dr. King records notes on symbolism as the expression of spiritual truths.

Humanism (15th Century)

Dr. King reflects on a classical approach to learning.

Telegram from Dr. Richard Moore to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965
Florida (FL), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. Richard Moore, on behalf of Bethune Cookman College, expresses support for Dr. King during the SCLC Voting Rights Campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Emily Fortson to Andrew Young

Saturday, February 25, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA)

Emily Fortson of Concreta Tours Incorporated sends Reverend Andrew Young an itinerary for an upcoming conference. Fortson also requests several materials to be included in a letter being formed to invite Dr. King to the conference.

Telegram from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, BRAZIL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

L. M. McCoy telegrams Dr. King expressing the urgency that the Methodist Church of Brazil receive a reply to their invitation for him to speak at their Centennial celebration in Brazil.

Letter from Paul P. Martin to MLK

Monday, March 26, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Erie Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to be the principal speaker at its Freedom Rally.

Workers Defense League Board Meeting Announcement

New York, NY

This is an invitation to the annual national executive board meeting of the Workers Defense League in New York City. The agenda is to discuss civil rights, how to defend the rights of conscientious objectors, workers and welfare recipients, political asylum, and other topics.

SCLC Fundraising Letter

Thursday, February 15, 1968

This 1968 SCLC fundraising letter is a personal appeal from Dr. King. He addresses subjects that would further polarize his supporters, detractors and the country as a whole.

Letter from MLK Regarding SCLC

Friday, October 1, 1965
Los Angeles, CA

In this letter, King discusses the importance of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. SCLC will continue their major work in the South, but will also respond to the calls of the North. He goes on to state that financial and moral support is always appreciated, and by a small contribution one could be part of "America's most imperative moral and social mission."

Letter from Marguerite B. Pilling to Dr. Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Marguerite B. Pilling writes Dr. Abernathy to show her support of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes the Negro could actually bring the United States back to a time of decency by bringing back prayer in public schools and removing violence from TV.

Letter from MLK to Louise Andrews

Wednesday, January 3, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King regretfully declines a speaking invitation of the American Friends Service Committee. Mrs. Louis Andrews is informed Dr. King has already accepted the maximum allowable speaking engagements for the season.

Letter from James R. Herrington to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Missouri (MO), Detroit, MI

James R. Herrington wrote this adverse letter to Dr. King, calling both him and his doctrine of civil disobedience "trash." Herrington ends his letter by saying that President Johnson cared more for Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement than the rest of the country, and therefore, won't be president again.

Inauguration Response by J. Lynwood Gresham

Friday, November 10, 1967

This document is the inauguration response delivered by Dr. J. Lynwood Gresham of Barber-Scotia College.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK about an Invitation

Wednesday, July 20, 1966
Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

In this letter, Mr. Hubert Humphrey, Vice President of the United States, writes to Dr. King declining his invitation to address the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Keynote Address Introduction for Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967
Florida (FL), Maine (ME), New York (NY), California (CA)

At the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers this introduction of guest speaker, Sidney Poitier. Andrew Young further praises Mr. Poitier for informing the black community that one should be "proud to be black" because "black is beautiful."

Progress in Race Relations

In this outline for a speech, Dr. King emphasizes the need for continued work in the area of race relations. He argues that it is necessary to abolish segregation for democracy to live.

Telegram from Governor Carl Sanders to MLK

Friday, October 15, 1965
New York (NY), Georgia (GA)

In this telegram, Governor Sanders informs Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. that he will not be able to attend Ebenezer Baptist Church's Annual Layman's Day.

Letter from Ruth A. Salinger to MLK

Thursday, November 14, 1963
Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Maryland (MD)

Salinger requests that Dr. King provide contact information for civil rights leaders along the route of a scheduled trip to study race relations to be taken by high school students from the church communities of Concord, Massachusetts.