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Freedom and Destiny

Dr. King discusses the topics of freedom and destiny as it relates to man.

Letter from Dr. Helen Curth to the MLK Memorial Fund

Thursday, April 11, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. Curth encloses a donation for the Martin Luther King Memorial Fund. She requests that a receipt for $5 be sent to each of her two grandsons so that they may feel connected to Dr. King's memory.

Method of Ex Abstraction

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosopher Alfred Whitehead's theory of extensive abstraction.

Letter from Virginia Madden to Mrs. King

Sunday, October 25, 1964
Philadelphia, PA

Virginia Madden, a 91-year-old white woman from Philadelphia, writes to congratulate Mrs. King on Dr. King's winning the Nobel Peace Prize. She says she has deplored racism and welcomes the new Civil Rights Law.

Letter from Svend Erik Stybe to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963

The president of the Danish Students' Association invites Dr. King to Denmark to give an address to Danish students.

Schleiermacher (The Immanence of God)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Dora McDonald to David Mays

Tuesday, October 22, 1963
Tennessee (TN), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora E. McDonald responds to David Mays of Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee. As requested, she encloses a copy of a speech Dr. King gave in Washington. Ms. McDonald also informs that a recording of the speech is available for purchase from the Council for United Civil Rights Leadership.

Letter from Glenn Greenwood to MLK

Tuesday, August 20, 1963
Chicago, IL

Glenn Greenwood informs Dr. King of a directive the United States Army issued that forbids all US Army personnel from participating in civil rights demonstrations. Greenwood expresses that this is a huge "infringement on freedom of assembly" and should be brought to the public's attention immediately.

Letter from Lucius D. Clay to MLK

Sunday, June 16, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Retired Army Officer Lucius D. Clay, responds to Dr. King, informing him that his telegram has be forwarded to T. C. Fogarty.

Letter Requesting a Meeting, to MLK from Harper & Brothers

Wednesday, November 7, 1962
New York, NY

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishers, referenced that he received notice that Dr. King would be preaching at Riverside Church, in New York City. Mr. Arnold asked whether or not Dr. King would be available for a meal, after his sermon at Riverside. He also thanked him for the additional sermons that had been received, for the preparation of Dr. King's second book.

Niebuhr, Reinhold

Dr. King references the preface to Reinhold Niebuhr's book, "Reflection on the End of an Era."

Letter from David Pope to MLK

Sunday, November 6, 1966

David Pope extends an invitation for Dr. King to come to Australia. Pope continues to state his solidarity for the Civil Rights Movement in the United States and speaks to the international commonalities of social justice issues.

Letter from Thomas S. Maloney to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 24, 1965
ITALY, Kentucky (KY)

Rev. Thomas S. Maloney informs Dora McDonald that he has yet to recieve previously requested materials regarding Dr. King's philosophy.

Letter from the Seventh Grade Class of Woodward School to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Anita Davis, Gail Williams, and Joan Rockwell request an interview with Dr. King for their class project.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King sends this telegram to Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding Saint Augustine's refusal to desegregate its public facilities.

Estimated Budget for 1957 - 1958

This drafted budget written by Dr. King lists a number of expenses and allotments for traveling, speaking engagements, supplies and utilities for the office.

Telegram from King Family to Mrs. Lucille Anderson

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

The King family sends its condolences to Mrs. Anderson.

Letter from Clarence B. Jones to the Editor of New York Times

Friday, June 7, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Clarence Jones writes the editor of the New York Times to comment on a statement made by James Reston. According to Mr. Jones the statement was factually inaccurate and partially paraphrased.

Great Neck Declaration of Rededication

New York (NY)

The citizens of Great Neck, New York rededicate themselves to the "struggle for equality and justice."


Dr. King writes on the topic of peace.

Nobel Peace Prize Dinner Program

Monday, January 27, 1964
Atlanta, GA

The citizens of Atlanta held a recognition dinner on January 27, 1965 to honor Dr. King for his Nobel Peace Prize. Tributes were offered by Mayor Ivan Allen, Jr., AME Bishop Ernest Hickman, Rev. Edward Driscoll of the Georgia Council of Churches, State Senator Leroy Johnson, and Roman Catholic Archbishop Paul Hallinan. Dr. King gave the address.

SCLC Retreat November 1967

South Carolina (SC), New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD, St. Augustine, FL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Reverend Andrew Young discusses civil disobedience at the SCLC's retreat in South Carolina. Dr. King and Jesse Jackson also make presentations at the retreat. Jesse Jackson states "we are too conscious of philosophy" and mentions "what's significant to the people is jobs or income." Dr. King talks about upcoming projects that will involve civil disobedience.

Letter From T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Saturday, December 24, 1966
New Delhi, India, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

T. K. Mahadevan, a representative of the Gandhi Peace Foundation, writes Dr. King regarding an upcoming visit to the United States. Some primary interests during his visit includes meeting key Negro leaders, spending time with an average Negro family, and perhaps a few speaking engagements.

Judaism (View of Jesus)

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Judaism according to the "Jewish Encyclopedia."

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

Rodney Clurman, of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, outlines Dr. King's itinerary for a global trip that includes meeting with officials from Scotland, the Pope in Rome, and travelling to New Delhi.



Dr. King writes about God, according to Jeremiah 3:12.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Johann R. Goelz

Friday, August 16, 1963
Milwaukee, WI, Wisconsin (WI), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Johann Goelz expressing his appreciation for the kind remarks shared in a previous correspondence. King hopes that the current work in Birmingham will yield a success that sets the tone for better race relations in the South.

Letter from The Very Rev. Raymond J. Swords to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964
New York, NY, Massachusetts (MA)

Fr. Raymond J. Swords, S.J., President of the College of the Holy Cross, writes to Dr. King, expressing how joyous he was to hear that King was selected as the 1964 Nobel Prize Winner.

Spring Mobilization Committee Information Sheets

New York (NY)

These information sheets concern the Spring Mobilization Committee's rally taking place within the United Nations. Topics discussed include meals, housing, and child safety.

Shriver Turnabout on Poverty Project Criticized

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH

William C. Selover writes this article covering the criticism around Sargent Shriver's decision to cut funding for the poverty relief program, Child Development Group of Mississippi. Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, had created Head Start programs and used the CDGM as a model for programs across the country. Several accusations are rendered as cause to the cut, including Shriver giving in to political pressure from segregationist senators of Mississippi. Many believe that once again poor people had "been sacrificed to political expediency."