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Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles E. Boddie

Friday, February 17, 1961

Dora McDonald informs Charles Boddie that Dr. King cannot accept any speaking engagements for his desired date because he has previously committed to having lunch with some students and faculty.

Financial Document-Receipt from Ramparts Magazine

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

This note references a check sent to Dr. King by Ramparts Magazine for monies received for the use of his Riverside Church Speech.

Letter from Beatrice Smith to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965

Beatrice Smith encloses a contribution to Dr. King and explains the interest and sympathy in Dr. King's work. She also expresses concern for the boycott of Alabama product stating that it might result in "more enemies than friends."

Crisis and The Church

Dr. King emphasizes the important role of the Church in the midst of a global political and social shift. He explores in detail the steps necessary to implement changes through the Church and its' constituents.

Letter from the KKK Kids to MLK

An anonymous member of The K.K.K. Kids writes Dr. King expressing that he or she believes Dr. King to be "a very ignorant person."

Note from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Harry and Julie Belafonte congratulate Dr. King on receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Harry Belafonte is an American entertainer and social activist.

Letter from Rabbi Philip Hiat to MLK

Wednesday, January 30, 1963

Rabbi Philip Hiat, Executive Vice-President of the Synagogue Council of America, invites Dr. King to meet with Jewish religious leaders.

Letter from Zabelle Tourian to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

Ms. Tourian commends Dr. King for his efforts against violence and describes the antagonism and discrimination against immigrants when she came as an Armenian to the U.S. in 1903.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harvey L. Gault

Friday, March 30, 1962

Dr. King informs Reverend Harvey Gault that he cannot accept the invitation to speak at Bethel A. M. E. Church. Dr. King lists some of his present and future commitments in explaining the capacity of his schedule.

Letter from Maddy Tolud to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Maddy Tolud, the President of A. R. K., thanks Dr. King for being an honorary member of their organization. Tolud assures him that their members will actively work towards equality until justice prevails.

Social Ethics

Dr. King records a quote from Psalms 41:1 and connects the passage to social ethics.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK about a Contribution

Thursday, March 9, 1967

In this letter A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King for contributions needed to carry out the work of the National Advisory Committee On Farm Labor (NACFL). Randolph states, "NACFL stretches its limited funds far, but now at this critical point we must ask for your support".

Letter from Cornell E. Talley to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Cornell E. Talley, Pastor of New Light Baptist Church, tells Dr. King that his church is withdrawing their pledge of $100 per month to the SCLC. Talley felt as if Dr. King was no longer fighting for civil rights, and that his leadership of anti-war demonstrations was counterproductive.

Letter from Jack Greenberg to MLK and Andrew Young

Friday, July 7, 1967

As a result of an automobile accident, Jack Greenberg informs Dr. King and Andrew Young of possible litigation against SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Donald Lincoln Cook

Monday, February 7, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Cook for letter, in which Cook stated his support of Dr. King's stance against the United States military's involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from Fred Warren to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Fred Warren, Professor of Music at the University of California at Berkeley writes to Dr. King saddened that he will not be able to come to the University. Professor Warren encloses a brochure describing the department's program on Africa, music, and its related arts.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Letter from David Mays to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 28, 1963

David Mays, Chairman of the Department of Speech and Theatre at Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee, participates in a continued correspondence with Dora McDonald. Mays inquires if the speech he requested will be under separate cover, as it was not enclosed in the recent letter. He also requests Dr. King's permission to make copies of the speech in order to pass out to students in his Principles of Rhetoric class.

Letter from Albert Turner to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

Albert Turner requests financial assistance from Dr. King to aid with the voting campaign against Governor Wallace.

Telegram from MLK to Chris Folker

Dr. King expresses enthusiasm regarding his upcoming trip to Sweden.

Letter from Senator Charles H. Percy to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

United States Senator, Charles H. Percy informs Dr. King that he would like him to read the enclosed speech, "Toward Responsible Freedom", given before the Community Renewal Society of Chicago. The senator also provides an update on the housing proposal and gives Dr.King a copy of the committee report.

Letter of Appreciation to MLK from Mrs. A.M.Digilio

Friday, July 30, 1965

In this letter, Mrs. A.M. Digilio writes to Dr. King. Along with her expressions of appreciation, she admits to being one of the millions of whites who have "prayerfully" followed Dr. King's work. Mrs. Digilio states that Dr. King has been a voice to those of the "inarticulate working class", both white and black. She speaks of the unfortunate decline of morality amongst Americans and the necessary Christian might to rectify it. Mrs. Digilio further compares Dr.

Negro Pioneers: Booker T. Washington

Lucille A. Chambers tells the story of Booker T. Washington's rise in society from his birth in Virginia to his founding of the Tuskegee Institute and the Negro Business League.

Statement from American Jewish Congress Regarding the Bundy School-Decentralization Plan

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Murray A. Gordon, a New York lawyer and national vice president of the American Jewish Congress, endorses the Bundy School-Decentralization plan. Mr. Gordon believes that the reform is essential to good education and assures teachers that the plan will not violate their rights.

Letter from Alfonzo Henderson to Afro-Americans

This letter from ARIDO (Afro-American Resource Industrial Development Organization) president Alfonzo Henderson outlines the organization's program goals.

Social Gospel

Dr. King describes the period of the social gospel.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Alfred T. Davies

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Rev. Alfred T. Davies that Dr. King will not be able to submit a sermon for "The Church Speaks on Race." Dr. King has just published "Strength to Love," which includes his sermons on many of the aspects of the civil rights movement.

Statement by Albert A. Raby

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Albert A. Raby releases a statement denouncing the Illinois State Senate for rejecting an equal housing bill. Mr. Raby calls for a tent-in and rally at the construction site for the proposed Weston plant. Raby cites Illinois is in violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and that federal funding for the Weston Project be terminated.

Letter from C. Alexander Brown to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

C. Alexander Brown requests that Dr. King and the SCLC conduct an investigation on the conditions of black prisoners in American jails. After reading about cruel conditions in an Arkansas prison, Brown questions how many innocent black prisoners are confined.

Letter from Thomas Baker to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Baker, a student in New York City, sends his condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.