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Notes on Movies

Monday, October 9, 1967

The writer states that the movie industry needs more stories without the 'Playboy' touch. He argues that this should come from the "masses" and not "society."

Law of Love

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man" on the place of the "law of love" in relation to human history.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1962

Sarah Harvey states that the receipt of Dr. King's letter and book made her feel "very unworthy." Mrs. Harvey also makes financial a contribution.

SCLC Voter Registration Agenda

This document captures the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's voter registration agenda in Detroit, Michigan between August 18 and August 23, 1967.

Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

Tuesday, December 1, 1959

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to Lyndon B. Johnson

Saturday, May 6, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to President Johnson suggesting a program to help end the war in Vietnam. Smedley urges President Johnson to implement the plan to bring an end to the longstanding fight.

Letter from Jameas Lucas to MLK Regarding Legal Help

Mr. Lucas requests Dr. King's legal assistance regarding a manslaughter trial against a white man.

Letter from Arthur C. Walter to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

Arthur Walter, Assistant Pastor at Park United Presbyterian Church, writes Dr. King regarding a boycott that will deny some African American children Christmas gifts. Walter inquires about how his church can use some of their funds to provide gifts for the children that will be affected by the boycott.

Memorandum from Carole to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Carole requests that Ms. McDonald channels several correspondence to Dr. King from those who will participate in a Convention.

What Do You Believe About Fair Housing?

This brochure was provided to the public to dispell the myths and solidify the facts of the fair housing market.

Letter from Fitzhugh Mullan to MLK

Wednesday, August 17, 1966

Fitzhugh Mullan, the Chairman of the Student Health Organization of Chicago, asks Dr. King to be an advisor to the organization. Nationwide, the student health movement has worked in the ghettos of Los Angeles, with California migrant farmworkers, and in three Southern states.

Draft Statement of Reverend Dr. MLK Jr.

This statement, not written in Dr. King's hand, responds to Joseph Alsop's syndicated column in the New York Herald Tribune. Dr. King clarifies that SCLC has no affiliation with the Communist Party. He also states the SCLC has not continued a relationship with Jack O'Dell since he was relieved of his responsibilities.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion."

Letter From S. I. Hayakawa to MLK

Friday, July 26, 1963

S.I. Hayakawa inquires about a previous contribution to the SCLC and asks if it is tax deductible.

Telegram from MLK to Joan Baez

Friday, December 29, 1967

Dr. King sends encouraging words to Joan Baez, an American singer and civil rights activist, who is imprisoned at Santa Rita Rehabilitation Center.

Letter from The Martin Luther King Fund to MLK

The Executive Committee of The Martin Luther King Fund in Sweden commends Dr. King's non-violent approach to the fight for civil rights in America. They also present Dr. King with a monetary donation raised from an earlier performance featuring Dr. King and Harry Belafonte at the Royal Opera House in Stockholm.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

Eulogy for the Four Girls Who Were Murdered in the Church in Birmingham

Sunday, September 15, 1963

Dr. King eulogizes the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church as "martyred heroines." He asserts that their deaths will serve a greater purpose: they will shed new light on Birmingham and the civil rights struggle.

Letter from Alberta Brown to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

The Adah Grand Chapter write Dr. King regarding an enclosed check for the SCLC.

Letter from Iva Sturm to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967

The author requests Dr. King to answer questions to solidify the political practices in America before he is to vote democratically.The questions involve concerns surround military, political, and economic issues within the United States. The authors' primary contention is the Vietnam War.

Pinn Memorial Baptist Church

Sunday, September 11, 1960

This program outlines the Sunday morning worship service for Pinn Memorial Baptist Church. Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker to deliver a sermon on September 11, 1960.

Letter from Mrs. Edna E. Williams to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

Mrs. Edna E. Williams invites Dr. King to attend The Friendship Baptist Church's annual Harry W. Knight Award and Mortgage Retirement Fund Banquet.

Letter from Alden Bryant to MLK

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Alden Bryant outlines a plan to assist with voter registration in the South by increasing the number of registrars. Bryant details how the process took place in Berkeley, California as an example. He requests a response from Dr. King to the plan.

The Business Card of the Honorable Al Shabazz (Malcolm X)

During the late 1950s, Malcolm X began going by Malik Al-Shabazz. Shabazz, according to the Nation of Islam, was a Black Nation in central Africa from which all human beings descended. While the date of this card is unknown, it is presumed to be circa the late 1950s to early 1960s, before Malcolm X split from the Nation of Islam in 1964.

Telegram Called in From Attorney General Nicholas Deb Katzenbach to MLK

Friday, February 19, 1965

Katzenbach responds to an urgent telegram from Dr. King concerning State Troopers that had trapped Demonstrators inside a church and refused to let them obtain medical attention. Katzenbach tells Dr. King that he is aware of the situation and that the Department Attorneys and the FBI were already on the scene in both Selma and Marion and investigations had already begun.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Biographical Sketches of Leaders of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

These are biographical sketches of various leaders who were involved in the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedoms. These distinguished individuals were involved in organizations that focused on equality and nonviolence.

Letter from Claudia Grams to MLK

Friday, November 15, 1963

Claudia Grams, a junior at Central High School in La Crosse, Wisconsin, has chosen Dr. King for her junior exposition project and writes him requesting information on his earlier life. She expresses how Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom," has inspired her and she inquires about how her organization can support his movement.

Fascism

Dr. King paraphrases one of Benito Mussolini's thoughts on fascism in "The Political and Social Doctrine of Fascism.

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Old Testament biblical book of Isaiah demonstrating God's wrath.