Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"S.C.L.C. Operation Breadbasket"

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Monday, January 18, 1965

Adlai Stevenson, US Ambassador to the United Nations, thanks Dr. King for a previous letter and for Dr. King's attendance at a reception at the United States Mission. Stevenson also congratulates Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

Letter from Major E. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965

Rev. Major Smith briefly informs Dr. King of the support he has given Dr. King's program and asks him to reconsider the Alabama Boycott. He explains that he does not agree with this decision and states that this may cost him some supporters.

From Our Struggle

This document contains quotations from a publication written by Dr. King entitled "From Our Struggle." The quotations give scenarios of struggles during the movement in Birmingham and Montgomery. "From Our Struggle" was published in the magazine, 'Liberation.'

Letter from MLK to Vincenso Lapiccirella

Thursday, January 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. Lapiccirella for his invitation to participate in a program in Florence, Italy.

Letter from the University of Capetown to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966

Monica Wilson asks if Dr. King can deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town.

Letter from Ronald F. Jockers and Ronald Schlossman to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Ronald Jockers and Ronald Schlossman write Dr. King inviting him to participate in the National Collegiate Presidential Primary Choice of 1968.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

SCLC's Tom Offenburger requests Dr. King's permission to go to Cleveland to do a story on the Cleveland Project.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

Ethel T. Elsea, Assistant Editor of Fleming H. Revell Company, writes Dr. King requesting to use his quotation in Frank S. Mead's unpublished book. Elsea also encloses a release form for the Reverend to sign and return.

Letter from Mary Ann Johnson to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Mary Ann Johnson of Boston thanks Dr. King for taking a stand against the bombing in Vietnam. Johnson stresses that funds supplied for the war cripples the wages of working people in America.

Letter from MLK to Hugh W. Nevin Jr.

Wednesday, November 20, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Hugh Nevin's letter inviting him to speak at St. George's School. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to his full calendar and thanks Mr. Nevin for his nice words regarding his book, "Stride Towards Freedom."

Letter from Debby Hopper to MLK

Sunday, May 26, 1963

Debby Hopper, a 17-year-old from the Boston area, writes Dr. King to discuss prejudice in America and relates what she believes to be the hypocrisy of whites in her community. She also offers Dr. King words of encouragement in his fight for civil rights.

Telegram from Rev T R Albert to MLK

Rev. T.R. Albert, Pastor of Weslay Methodist Church, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, sent Dr. King words of encouragment while he recovered in the Harlem hospital.

WBBM-TV: Ban Further Marches

Tuesday, August 16, 1966

This report by WBBM-TV of Chicago states that 60% of their feedback panelists would prefer the banning of further civil rights marches to reduce racial tension. Other questions posed include the perceived appropriate police response, the effect on neighborhoods, and Dr. King's influence in Chicago.

Telegram from Ms. Dora McDonald to A.J. Cervantes

Ms. Dora McDonald responded to a telegram sent from St. Louis Mayor A. J. Cervantes, inviting Dr. King to participate in a conference entitled, "Tell It Like It Is." The conference, held in St. Louis, MO, was to feature civil rights leaders, mayors and other organizers. Ms. McDonald informed Mayor Cervantes that Dr. King was out of town and to look for a response from Dr. King at a later time.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

Letter from Harley Lappin to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

The Public Affairs Committee of Winters College at York University in Ontario invites Dr. King to participate in a discussion to raise student awareness of current political issues.

Letter from Joe Johnson and Lewis Black to Robert Swann

Members of the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association send this letter of appreciation to the International Independence Institute.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Pearl Goodwin

Monday, October 19, 1964

In response to a previous request, Dora McDonald informs Pearl Goodwin that Dr. King will be unable to provide a commentary for her book "A Book of Commentary." She mentions that the request cannot be fulfilled due to Dr. King's chaotic speaking schedule.

Letter from Troy J. Horton to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Troy J. Horton, a teacher at Wilson High School, inquires if Dr. King is interested in speaking to the student body of the school on topics such as racism, prejudice and segregation.

Paint

Noting the vastness of the sky and "heavens," Dr. King comments on the Earth, stars, and surrounding planets.

Citizenship Education Proposal

SCLC's Citizenship Education Program issues a five year proposal for the period between 1965 and 1970. The proposal outlines previous successful activities since the inception of the program.

Letter from John and Elfriede Kallpelz to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963

John and Elfriede Kallpelz send Dr. King a financial contribution in honor of the late President Kennedy. Mr. Kallpelz, a native of Atlanta writing from Germany, explains the closeness he feels to Dr. King's work.

The Integrity of Martin Luther King

This letter was written in response to Dr. King's address concerning U.S. involvement in Vietnam. The address was given at the Ford Hall Forum, in Boston, MA. The author speaks to Dr. King's courage and integrity for humanity.

Letter from John Huston to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967

Reverend John Huston of the East View United Church of Christ writes to Dr. King to express his appreciation for Operation Breadbasket. Huston calls this the most effective civil rights initiative he's ever had the pleasure of working on. He brings up three points that he would like to discuss with Dr. King, including how to better advocate for the Negroes' federally guaranteed rights.

Letter From Clifford Alexander Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, June 28, 1967

Clifford Alexander Jr. thanks Dr. King for supporting him in his nomination as Chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Letter From Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Publication Date of the German Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Friday, May 22, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the desire of the German publishers to have a publication date. Joan Daves also inquires if Dr. King has free time for Mayor Brandt.

Paul Tillich

Dr. King references the theologian, Paul Tillich, by asserting, "If philosophy of religion does not consider the revelation claim of religion, it misses its object and doesn't deal with real religion."

Letter from David Mays to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 28, 1963

David Mays, Chairman of the Department of Speech and Theatre at Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee, participates in a continued correspondence with Dora McDonald. Mays inquires if the speech he requested will be under separate cover, as it was not enclosed in the recent letter. He also requests Dr. King's permission to make copies of the speech in order to pass out to students in his Principles of Rhetoric class.

Letter from Norman Thomas to MLK

Monday, December 7, 1964

Noted Presbyterian Minister and pacifist Norman Thomas thanks Dr. King for sending a birthday message that was played at his reception. He further gives his well wishes to Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and hopes to attend Dr. King's recognition ceremony.

Telegram from MLK to President Eisenhower

Thursday, August 13, 1959

This is the text of a telegram Dr. King sent to President Eisenhower regarding the contemporaneous events of the opening of desegregated schools and the arrival of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev.