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"S.C.L.C. Operation Breadbasket"

Letter from MLK to Don Blaine

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King shows delight in Mr. Don Blaine's idea of promoting a "peace caravan" to travel around the United States. He requests that Blaine further develop the idea and contact heads of various peace organizations to assist in the endeavor. Dr. King also displays his willingness to participate in the caravan.

Letter from B. Hubert Holloman to MLK

Friday, July 12, 1963

B. Hubert Holloman asks Dr. King not to bring any more demonstrations to North Carolina, because he feels they lead to hate, violence, and encourage young people to break the law.

Letter from Carleton L. Spier to MLK

Wednesday, January 11, 1967

Spier shares his disapproval of Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell and his concern regarding Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Inquiring about Dr.King's Professional Tour

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Mrs.Daves has requested that Mrs.McDonald send information pertaining to Dr.King's lectures and personal appearances to her office as soon as possible.

Negro's Defense Against Acts of Violence

Dr. King describes nonviolent direct action and its effects against oppressors of the movement. He speaks about the undaunted fight and relentlessness even in the face of brutality.

Letter from Marsha and Roger Zimmerman to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerman send a note of support to Dr. King's for his statements regarding the Vietnam conflict.

Memorandum from John Gunther to Urban Coalition Steering Committee

Monday, December 11, 1967

John Gunther submits a report to the members of the Steering Committee of the Urban Coalition stating that the Urban Coalition should be concerned with issues related to education, employment and housing. The memorandum outlines the job of the Council of Local Coalitions and states that the Steering Committee may add to the Coalition's numbers at any time. Lastly, Gunther informs the members of the staffing polices explaining how staffing will be planned on a yearly basis.

Telegram To Dr. King Awarding A Grant

Thursday, June 29, 1967

In this telegram to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mr. Roberts of the Contracts Branch US Office of Education informs Dr. King that his proposal entitled, "A Demonstration - Basic Adult Education Project for Urban Negroes," has been approved.

Faith

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from William Adams Brown's "Beliefs that Matter."

Letter from K. Emmons to MLK

K. Emmons proposes to Dr. King that Christians should put God and Jesus above "fumbling politicians." K. Emmons also comments on soldiers in Vietnam.

Telegram from Sen. Edward Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

Senator and Mrs. Edward M. Kennedy congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. White

Dr. King informs Mrs. White that she should seek financial assistance from her local welfare office because the SCLC will not be able to provide that service.

Letter from MLK to Yves Montand

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. Montand of France, for his financial contribution as well as his personal support for the success of the movement in the United States.

Permission Form from Friendship House to MLK for Signature

Sunday, December 11, 1966

This document, from James G. Duignan of Friendship House, is sent to Dr. King for his signature, granting permission to reproduce, distribute and or sell recorded copies of two speeches.

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.

Cover Page for SCLC's Financial Report

This cover page for SCLC's financial report indicates the period will cover from August 15 to August 19, 1966.

Royalty Summary from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, November 4, 1966

This cable from Joan Daves to Dr. King details the earned value of British royalties and the number of copies sold for "Stride Towards Freedom" and "Strength to Love."

Schleiermacher (The Immanence of God)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Citation for MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1961

This document contains the passage read on the occasion of the conferral of an honorary doctoral degree from University of Bridgeport to Dr. King.

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to MLK

Friday, September 21, 1962

Eleanor Roosevelt invites Dr. King to appear in the first installment of a series of televised discussions entitled "The American Experience."

Telegram from Gitta Gossmann to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Gossmann sends Dr. King a royalty check for his book "Why We Can't Wait" in the amount of $3,448.76.

Poor People's Campaign

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Dr. King is touring the nation to meet poor people in an effort to expose their living conditions. He also wants them to join the campaign to fight for better housing and jobs.

Letter from MLK to FDR III

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the contribution of $1,000.00 made by Franklin D. Roosevelt III to the SCLC.

Letter from Abdul Razak Ahmad to MLK

Friday, August 26, 1966

Abdul Razak Ahmad requests a message of support from Dr. King for an upcoming event. Ahmad is the president of the University of Singapore's Socialist Club. This letter praises Dr. King for his leadership and also discusses racial problems in Singapore.

What is Man?

Sunday, January 12, 1958

Citing views from historical and contemporary figures, Dr. King asserts that the definition of "man" lies somewhere between God and an animal. Dr. King contends that, although man is limited by time and space, humans are not animals, because they have the capacity for rational thought. However, the central theme that Dr. King argues is that humanity is inherently evil and must constantly strive for high moral standards.

Letter from MLK to Kathy Sasso

Monday, April 27, 1964

Dr. King shares his pleasure in being named "Person of the Week" by Miss Sasso's class. He encloses a copy of one of his speeches.

The Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Storthing

Thursday, January 30, 1964

The members of the Swedish Parliament honors Dr. King for the Nobel Peace Prize Award. The Parliament expounds on the prosperous and revolutionary efforts of Dr. King and encourages him to continue the methodology of nonviolence introduced by Mahatma Gandhi. Dr. King is further highlighted for his works in the United States and his contributions to eradicate racial discrimination.

Letter from Washington University to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Faculty of the Political Science Department at Washington University release a resolution supporting Dr. King and his efforts to secure voting rights for Negroes in Selma, Alabama. They urge the Federal Government to take a serious look at this issue following recent attacks upon Negroes trying to exercise their right to vote.

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Summer Session Banquet: The Role of Education in the Civil Rights Movement

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Dr. King gives an address on the role of education in the civil rights movement at Syracuse University's Fourteenth Annual Summer Session Banquet.