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"S.C.L.C. Operation Breadbasket"

Letter from Stanley Singer to MLK

Sunday, August 5, 1962

Stanley Singer replies to Dr. King's article in the NY Times Magazine entitled, "The Case Against 'Tokenism'." Mr. Singer implies that the Negro race is inferior due to their immorality. He highlights the perceived negative attributes of the African American community by the inadequacies within their family structure. Mr. Singer expounds on nonviolent resistance, the Civil War, the U.S. constitution, and more.

Southern Christian Leadership Conference Resolution

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a resolution urging all religious institutions to encourage their members to vote in the local, state and national elections of 1964.

Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Monday, October 12, 1959

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

Letter from Robert Hilborn to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965

Robert Hilborn, President of The Empire Club of Canada invites Dr. King to be honored as the guest speaker. Hillborn offers the option of two different dates.

Letter of Resignation Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Rachel Davis DuBois resigns from the staff of SCLC to help the organization during a time of financial difficulties. Dr. DuBois offers her services in the future whenever needed without compensation.

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK Requesting a Leave of Absence from the S.C.L.C.

Monday, June 13, 1966

Randolph T. Blackwell requests a one-year leave of absence from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to work with Citizens Crusade Against Poverty. Blackwell will assist the S.C.L.C. sister organization with its emerging Southern Rural Development Project.

Jesus

This note card seems to reflect some of Dr. King's personal insights on Jesus. It belongs to a series of note cards devoted to the topic of Jesus.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Richard T. Andrews, Jr.

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King express thanks for the Mt. Zion Congregational Church's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King details and outlines how their financial assistance will further foster the improvement of the racial issues in the South. The SCLC would be "caught in a dungeon of despair" if they did not have any moral support from various individuals and organizations.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLk

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

In this document, Dr. King's literary agent, Joan Daves, forwards a royalty statement, for the French editions of Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Strength to Love."

My Jewish Brother

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

Dr. King responds to a recent anti-Semitic remark made by a fellow civil rights leader. He discusses the need for Hebrew prophets to revitalize the moral conscious of society. "Let justice roll down like the waters of righteousness as a might stream."

Letter from Lucy Amerson to MLK

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Lucy Amerson corresponds with Dr. King in reference to a $150 donation made by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. to SCLC. The donation was a portion of the funds raised through the Ebony Fashion Fair project.

A New South A-Coming

This pamphlet discusses the courageous stand of African American high school students against racial discrimination in the South. The efforts demonstrated by these young people to bring about change of many undemocratic practices were significantly noted in Negro history.

Invoice for The 1961 American Peoples Encyclopedia Yearbook

This invoice was sent to Dr.King is from the 1961 American Peoples Encyclopedia, which gives an account of the events during the year 1960.

Letter from M. Steven Lubet to MLK

Friday, March 3, 1967

M. Steven Lubet is requesting the presence of Mr. and Mrs. King at the Vietnam teach-in. The teach-in is being sponsored by the Northwestern chapter of Students for a Democratic Society and its purpose is to increase people's understanding of the events occuring in Vietnam.

Self

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology.”

Immortality

Dr. King cites the Old Testament Book of Isaiah regarding the topic of immorality.

Fact Sheet on the Southern Negro Vote

Fact sheet from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference summarizing the registered Negro voters in eleven states of the South for a period ranging from 1947 to 1956

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Martin J. Morand, Vice-President of the Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg, inquires about Dr. King's availability to serve as a guest speaker at a late 1964 meeting in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.

Letter from Kenneth Lee to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

Kenneth Lee, President of the International Confederation of Disarmament and Peace, invites Dr. King to become a sponsor of the organization.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, July 22, 1965

In this letter, John Lewis requests a loan for the amount of $10,000 from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference so that the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee can meet their payroll and cover pressing bills. He then speaks on the importance of continuous dialogue between the SCLC and SNCC.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Strength to Love" German Edition

Wednesday, January 25, 1967

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the German edition of Dr. King's "Strength to Love," published by Christliche.

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.

MLK Organizes Campaign for Voters

Dr. King announces a "nationwide bipartisan drive to get out the vote on election day." King's campaign charges religious leaders across the USA to help mobilize people to vote for the upcoming presidential election.

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the universe.

Telegram from MLK to Sammy Davis Jr.

Dr. King requests that Mr. Davis ask Frank Sinatra to serve as Honorary Host at the SCLC Benefit Cocktail Party held in Miami.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Benjamin Spock

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

Dr. King thanks Dr. Spock, famed pediatrician and social activist, for his recent contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Earl C. Scott

Thursday, September 13, 1962

Dr. King writes Reverend Earl C. Scott expressing appreciation for his words of encouragement and providing Reverend Scott with information regarding his current work towards social justice.

Can You Live Where You Want to Live?

George and Eunice Grier write regarding the topic "Can you live where you want to live?" This article discusses discrimination and segregation in housing. The Griers assert that integration in jobs and public places is advancing, but segregation in housing still plagues many people in America.

Birmingham Jail

Tuesday, December 7, 1965

Reverend Robert J. Leuver sends Dr. King an article titled "Birmingham Jail.". In the article, Harry Cargas learns that there are some members of the police force who support the Civil Rights Movement, but are too fearful to speak out against the racial atrocities. It was here that Mr. Cargas realized the ongoing struggle for outspoken and silent supporters of the movement for social change.