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"S.C.L.C. Operation Breadbasket"

Letter to Clark, Dodge and Company from MLK

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Here is a letter from Dr. King to anonymous donor through Clark, Dodge and Company acknowledging the receipt of stock shares to the SCLC. Dr. King goes on to elaborate on how this contribution will directly impact the efforts of SCLC.

SCLC: MLK Still Most Influential Negro According to Studies

Friday, November 3, 1967

The SCLC issues a news release stating that Dr. King is the most influential Negro leader in America. Dr. King, along with other prominent members of the SCLC, was serving a five-day jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama at the time of the news release.

Moving to Another Mountain

Wesleyan University publishes an edited transcript of a speech given by Dr. King in 1964. The publication is made in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Samuel F. Daly to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

The author suggests Dr. King reclaim his leadership of the civil rights movement from Stokely Carmichael and Rap Brown.


Dr. King writes on "man" and considers the evolutionary thinking behind "the survival of the fit."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

In this letter from Joan Daves, Dr. King is informed that a check for $24.96 is enclosed. The check represents the permission fee for the use of an extract from "Stride Toward Freedom" by Macmillan Company.

Letter from P. D. Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

P. D. Thompson, a member of the South African Institute of Race Relations, writes to Dr. King seeking help with South Africa's race relations.

Problems of Esthetics

Dr. King writes class notes from his Problems of Esthetics course at the University of Pennsylvania around 1950-1951. He enrolled in the above class while attending Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from MLK to Louis J. Braun

Tuesday, September 9, 1969

Dr. King agrees to serve on the Advisory Board of Campus Americans for Democratic Action. Dr. King explains that his ability to contribute to the Board will be limited, but he will assist when possible.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to President Kennedy

Dr. Jackson produces a copy of this telegram sent to President John F. Kennedy, in which he requests the president use his executive power to suppress violent racial tensions in the South. This telegram was prompted by the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four little girls.

Letter from Dorothy Height to Dr. and Mrs. King

Thursday, December 8, 1966

Noted civil rights leader and women's activist Dorothy Height invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be special guests at the National Council of Negro Women's Life Membership Dinner. The event is also set to honor union leaders A. Philip Randolph, Walter Reuther and Mrs. Arthur Goldberg. Singer Lena Horne serves as a co-host to the dinner.

Letter from Thomas Hejzlar to MLK

Friday, December 1, 1967

Student Thomas Hejzlar of Czechoslovakia writes to Dr. King requesting an autograph. He includes a postcard for Dr. King to sign and return.

Telegram from The Mathis Family to MLK

Monday, April 15, 1963

The Mathis family sends their support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham City Jail.

Central Methodist Church Program

Sunday, August 18, 1957

Dr. King speaks at the Central Methodist Church after a Sunday service regarding the work that he has done for the community.

Meeting of Action Committee

Friday, March 22, 1968

Dr. King sends a meeting notice to members of the SCLC Action Committee. He also includes a list of reports to be prepared concerning the Washington Mobilization.

Acknowledgement of Condolences

A standard form of an acknowledgment response, in reference to the receipt of condolences, is highlighted in this document.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Plea for Help to MLK

Sunday, March 24, 1968

Correspondence from Presidee McCaskill requesting aid from Dr. King regarding her real estate predicament.

The Social Organization of Nonviolence

Dr. King breaks down the structure of a nonviolent movement. He describes at length the difference between "token" integration and true integration. He describes three types of violence that could be used to achieve integration to which he prefers the "wholesome," nonviolent choice. Lastly, Dr. King gives his opinion on the "evils" of war.

Article Briefly Summarizing MLK's Life, Leadership and Accomplishments

This article acknowledges the many accomplishments made by Dr. King. The writer cites the various highlights of Dr. King's work and maintains "...America will never be the same."

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Wednesday, July 8, 1964

In this letter Senator Hubert Humphrey urges Dr. King to accept an invitation to speak at the annual meeting of the American Political Science Association.

Letter from MLK to The Farmington Ministerial Association

Monday, January 30, 1967

This letter, dated January 30, 1967, was sent from Dr. King to the Farming Ministerial Association. In this letter, he thanks them for their contribution and apologizes for responding late. Their letter was accidentally placed in a folder entitled "Letters to be filed". He further goes on to state how he wishes they, along with other loyal contributors could know more directly how important their support is to the SCLC and all that it stands for.

Memorandum from Carole to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Carole requests that Ms. McDonald channels several correspondence to Dr. King from those who will participate in a Convention.

Vote No on State Question 409 – Oklahoma NAACP

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders state their opinions regarding ballot question 409, the "right to work" law. All of the civil rights leaders encourage Negro readers to vote against passing his law because it will not benefit the Negro worker.

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card-1967

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Warren J. Day submits his annual contribution to the SCLC. He adds a small note thanking Dr. King for taking a strong role in the peace movement.

Letter from Samuel W. Williams to MLK

Wednesday, February 15, 1956

In this letter, Rev. Samuel W. Williams, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, offers encouraging words to Dr. King.


Dr. King records a Francis Bacon quote on atheism.

Letter from Kenyan Student to MLK

Monday, March 5, 1962

A student writes Dr. King expressing support for his movement and social views in regards to Civil Rights.

Letter from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 19, 1965

This letter dated June 19, 1965, was written to Dr. King from R. Edward Dodge, Jr. In this letter Mr. Dodge, a Caucasian man asks Dr.King if he can help him find integrated housing in Baltimore, Maryland. He will be moving there in a year to study at the John Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. He wants to bring his family with him and he wants his children to interact and become friends with other black children. He asks for Dr. King's help without any fanfare.

Letter from Roud Shaw to MLK

Roud Shaw of Kentucky writes to Dr. King informing him that his defense is "too well written" and should be crafted for a second grade level. Shaw also encloses a self-written article that appeared in the Louisville Courier Journal, in which he affirms his support to Dr. King and asserts that Cassius Clay should not be drafted for military service.