Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"SENEGAL"

Letter from Werner Schatz to MLK

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Werner Shcatz requests Dr. King presence in Basle, Switzerland and congratulates him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize Award of 1964.

Letter from Charles A. Halleck to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964

Charles A. Halleck expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter outlining his reasons for opposing the seating of the five congressmen for the state of Mississippi.

City's Leaders Plan Dinner for MLK

Wednesday, January 6, 1965

This article announces a banquet to be held to honor Dr. King for his Nobel Peace Prize award. The banquet is hosted by various leaders in the City of Atlanta.

Letter from Edward Rutledge and Jack Wood to Robert Weaver

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Edward Rutledge and Jack E. Wood Jr. represent the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, Center for Fair Housing. They expound on housing, planning policies, and programs for New York City. In addition, they affirm their belief that policy-makers should include and reflect the concerns of the minority.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.

Letter from Julia Smith to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1962

Julia Smith asks Dr. King to pray for her because she wants to study nursing at Michigan State University, a predominately white school at the time. She also reminds Dr. King of their previous encounter in St. Louis, Missouri where she shook his hand.

Telegram from Governor Carl Sanders to MLK

Friday, October 15, 1965

In this telegram, Governor Sanders informs Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. that he will not be able to attend Ebenezer Baptist Church's Annual Layman's Day.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Letter from Betty Doocy to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Betty Doocy of Chicago, Illinois mildly criticizes Dr. King for leading marches in an effort to integrate neighborhoods in Chicago. She tells Dr. King of her experiences living in poverty as a non-Negro, and how her family has been able to survive and endure hardships. Doocy encourages Dr. King to instruct Negroes to properly take care of their living quarters and to be respectable in their job professions.

Letter from Robert S. Browne to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967

Robert S. Browne informs Dr. King that he disagrees with the editor the New York Times. Browne conveys his support to Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy.

MLK's Annual Report to SCLC Convention

Friday, October 2, 1964

As President of the SCLC, Dr. King delivers his Annual Report to the Eighth Annual Convention in Savannah, Georgia. In addition to listing SCLC's many accomplishments over the past year, Dr. King urges his audience to stay resolute as their great progress creates a growing racial backlash from those opposed to the Civil Rights Movement.

Beyond Vietnam

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

In Dr. Kings Beyond Vietnam address, he discusses seven major reasons for bringing Vietnam into "a field of moral vision," five things that the government should do to remove itself from conflict with Vietnam, the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam, and Premier Diem. Dr. King also encourages those in the churches and the synagogues to speak out against the war in Vietnam.

Statement by MLK on the U.S. Stand in Vietnam

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Dr. King discusses how to involve the public in discussions regarding the Vietnam War. He states that the public should be educated about the history and issues of the war.

Bread at Midnight

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Aristotle's Psy

Dr. King writes about Aristotle's views on the soul.

Ebony: Advice For Living

Thursday, May 1, 1958

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

Letter from Walter Simcich to MLK

Monday, August 9, 1965

The International Woodworkers of America invites Dr. King to speak at its biennial convention in Toronto. Additionally, Mr. Simcich extends an invitation to speak at the British Columbia Federation of Labour's convention in Vancouver.

Letter from The Martin Luther King Fund to MLK

The Executive Committee of The Martin Luther King Fund in Sweden commends Dr. King's non-violent approach to the fight for civil rights in America. They also present Dr. King with a monetary donation raised from an earlier performance featuring Dr. King and Harry Belafonte at the Royal Opera House in Stockholm.

Letter from Charles Henry to Ralph David Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Mr. Henry chastises Rev. Abernathy for an adverse comment he made towards White people. As a negro, he urges that the only way to get White people to stop name calling names is for Negroes to do the same.

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Eugene Cook, Attorney General of Georgia, writes to Mr. Walker regarding Dr. King's refusal to reveal the name of the persons recommending and interviewing Jack O'Dell.

Harper & Row, Publishers, Book Format Instructions

This document contains instructions for the proper format of one of Dr. King's books.

Letter from Aziz Shihab to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967

Aziz Shihab offers the services of National Tours of Jordan in arranging Dr. King's trip to the Holy Land.

Man (John Scotus Eriugena)

Dr. King outlines Erigena's theory of how the current state of complexity in the universe came about.

Letter from Anne Jewett to MLK

In this letter dated May 5, 1967, Jewett informs King of her song. Let There Be Peace. Jewett believes that this simple song is what churches and peace marchers need, so that they can be heard. She has given the song to King in hopes that the people everywhere will be able to sing out.

Dr. King on Vietnam: Demagogic Tactics

Brigadier General S. L. A. Marshall critiques Dr. King's Vietnam stance and asserts that Dr. King's position undermines his work and credibility as a civil rights leader.

Idealism

Dr. King cites several statements regarding idealism.

Letter from Mrs. Phyllis Nissel to MLK

Phyllis Nissel congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She remembers hearing his speech at the March on Washington and appreciates Dr. King's ability to represent the voices of so many.

What Is Man?

This is one of several documents where Dr. King explores the nature of "man." He considers the question "what is man?" to be a timeless concept that "confronts any generation." Dr. King's analysis incorporates Biblical and Shakespearean texts, among other notable references.

Telegram from Elmer J. Holland to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman Holland assures Dr. King that he will "oppose all crippling amendments" to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965.