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"SENEGAL"

Selma to Montgomery Commemorative Rally Suggestion

This outline features a tentative agenda, statement of purpose, and key logistical information pertaining to the commemorative rally celebrating the completion of the 1965 Selma to Montgomery March.

A Minority of One

Thursday, June 1, 1967

In an attempt to enhance positive intergroup relations, Mrs. Porter was interviewed during "inservice education sessions" at a school of nursing. Because Mrs. Porter was "the first and only Negro who had been graduated from" the school, the faculty wanted insight into her experience of integration. Gloria M. Francis wrote this article covering the interview.

New York Times: Johnson Asks $75 Million for Poverty Projects

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

This article, written by Joseph A. Loftus for the New York Times, discusses President Johnson's appeal to Congress for $75 Million for anti-poverty summer programs. Johnson's previous request for $1.6 Billion for the War on Poverty had been granted, and these additional funds would provide for pools, day care, and summer programs for areas of extreme poverty, particularly in the Delta of Mississippi. Senators Joseph Clark and Jacob Kavits, of Pennsylvania and New York, respectively, also appeal for anti-poverty funds.

Race Problems in Albany

Wednesday, December 13, 1961

In the midst of some very disturbing events taking place in Albany, GA, Edward P. Morgan of the American Broadcasting Company writes this captivating broadcast message reflecting his personal view of the Negro's increasing self-awareness and recognition of its place in society.

Letter from P. A. Riley to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

A critic writes Dr. King a carefully constructed letter to share her view on his Vietnam War stance. As a widow of a late Korean War veteran, she claims that Dr. King's position undermines "everything that our fighting men, down thru the long, long, years, have fought and died for." The widow questions Dr. King's combination of civil rights and peace movement issues, and asserts "patriotism is one of the factors free men live and prosper under!"

Letter From Joseph Livingston to MLK Regarding Receipt of Letter

Saturday, December 2, 1967

Here Joseph Livingston beckons Dr. King to confirm receipt of a letter sent in reference to what he describes as "a matter of Life and Death".

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr.

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

Dr. King extended his appreciation to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr. for the letter and copy of Mr. Wood's speech given on the Demonstration Cities Program.

Contribution Letter from Motown Records

Thursday, September 5, 1963

As indicated in a recording agreement with Dr. King, Esther Edwards, Vice President of Motown Records, sends $200.00 to the SCLC.

Letter from Thomas Hirst to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1966

Thomas E. Hirst re-extends Dr. King an invitation for a speaking engagement at the Law School Forum of the University of Alberta. The Law School Forum publicly presents many intellectuals to present to their audience and provide community service. Mr. Hirst asserts that Canada serves as a neighbor to the United States and is concerned with the Civil Rights Movement.

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

Tuesday, December 17, 1963

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

Hints on Religious Music for Radio

This pamphlet, written by Charles Schmitz, acknowledges the impact of music on religious radio. Schmitz maintains that music helps establish the purpose of religious radio programs and that certain musical selections have the power to create Christian mood and comfort. This pamphlet gives instructions on how best to implement music.

Letter from Richard U. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967

Rev. Richard Smith expresses his political views on the possible re-election of Adam Clayton Powell. Smith explains to Dr. King and other leaders that to rally for Mr. Powell is to ignore the moral character of man.

Let My People Vote

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Draft of MLK Response to the Establishment of a Bi-Racial Commission in Saint Augustine, Florida

This is a draft of a response for Dr. King to make regarding the establishment of a bi-racial commission in St. Augustine, Florida to address the issues of equality, human dignity and racial justice.

Letter from Thomas H. Rogers to MLK

Saturday, February 11, 1967

On Race Relations Sunday, Thomas H. Rogers writes this letter to express his brotherhood and prayers for Dr. King. Emphasizing that one live a life acceptable to God, Rogers believes that God, not man, makes the only judgement. Though of a different race than Dr. King, Rogers sees Dr. King as his brother in Christ and encourages him to do God's biding.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King outlines Friedrich Schleiermacher's concept of religion.

Letter from Rev. T.Y. Rogers to SCLC Affiliates

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Rev. Rogers writes to SCLC affiliates in Alabama, Georgia and Mississippi informing them that Dr. King, Rev. Ralph Abernathy, and others will begin serving a 5-day jail sentence in Jefferson County Jail for violating an injunction forbidding them to march on Good Friday or Easter Sunday. He requests that all affiliates meet in Birmingham, Alabama to show support.

Letter from Butler Henderson to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Butler Henderson invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Dinner for the President of Morehouse College, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays.

What's Your Brotherhood Quotient?

National Comics Publications, Inc. publishes this questionnaire as a public service to gauge the attitudes of readers while also enlightening readers about their own xenophobic perceptions. The writer asserts that it is okay to dislike vegetables or insects, but to dislike people is to "hurt them and cheat yourself."

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding ?Why We Can?t Wait? Royalties

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

In this letter Campe encloses payment from Econ Verlag for ?Why We Can?t Wait? royalties.

B. Clifton Reardon Recap of William Temple

This is an essay written by B. Clifton Reardon on William Temple, the Archbishop of Canterbury. Temple was one of the founding members of the Council of Christians and Jews.

Letter of Condolence from MLK

Friday, November 22, 1963

Dr. King expresses his grief as a result of President Kennedy's assassination.

Letter from Clarence Portericker to Mrs. King

Clarence Portericker, a student in New York, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King hoping that Dr. King's dream will come true.

Legal Brief of Robert Greene

Robert Greene, a mixed race individual from New York, appeals his case to the Supreme Court of the United States. Greene asserts that New York investigators and police conspired to violate his civil rights by means of wrongful arrest and detention, even after his innocence became apparent. Furthermore, as Greene is recognized as indigent, his case proceeds "in forma pauperis," or without the burden of court costs and legal fees.

Letter from Leland Stewart to MLK

Thursday, May 11, 1967

Leland Stewart, of the Conference on Science and Religion, writes to Dr. King to offer support in the movement to end the war in Vietnam.

Telegram from the Students Union of Aarus University to MLK

Friday, October 16, 1964

The Students Union of Aarus University congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from MLK to President John F. Kennedy

Friday, March 30, 1962

Dr. King sends an urgent telegram to President Kennedy recommending Judge William Hastie and Judge Thurgood Marshall be given serious consideration for a seat on the Supreme Court.

Letter from Reverend Durstan R. McDonald to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Friday, March 15, 1968

The Hobart and William Smith Colleges have brought influential leaders to their campus from the civil rights and black power movements. Many students desire a further understanding of the Gospel and have requested to invite Dr. King to speak. The dates provided for this engagement are unfortunately subsequent to the assignation of Dr. King.

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College for 1944-1948

Tuesday, November 7, 1950

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College from 1944-1948.