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Letter from David B. Lord to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

In this letter to Dr. King , David B. Lord draws connections between the Vietnam War and poverty in American society. He agrees with Dr. King's stance on the war and approach to civil rights. According to Mr. Lord, real civil rights progress cannot be made until a solution is found to the war.

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Democracy

On this handwritten notecard, Dr. King outlines Ralph Barton Perry's views on Democracy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, October 31, 1966

The SCEF Executive Board asserts that the attack of black power is injuring the plight of democracy in the United States. The SCEF board declared "the idea of black power has a long and honorable history but it is currently being misrepresented in the news media in the United States."

Pessimism

Dr. King quotes John Hodgdon Bradley from an article in the December 1932 Atlantic Monthly, “Letter from a Scientist to a Priest.”

Nietzsche

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche.

Letter from Rachelle Horowitz to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Administrative Secretary for the A. Phillip Randolph Institute, Rachelle Horowitz apologizes to Dora McDonald for an apparent misunderstanding regarding pamphlet pricing.

Letter from The Downtown Charity Club to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

The Downtown Charity Club wishes to accompany Dr. King from the Baltimore headquarters for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

Letter from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967

The Board of Missions of the Methodist Church, on behalf of the Methodist Church of Brazil, invites Dr. King to speak at the centennial celebration of Methodist missionary work in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. McCoy also provides a brief history of the Methodist Church of Brazil.

The Tension Between Life's Palm Sunday and Life's Good Friday

Dr. King delivered this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church in April of 1960. In this sermon he discussed two days of prime importance in the life of Jesus namely Palm Sunday, "the moment of fulfillment" and Good Friday, the day of his crucifixion.

Invitation from University Religious Association

Friday, April 1, 1966

The University Religious Association sends Dr. King an invitation to be a guest speaker at the University of Florida.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Sunday, November 6, 1966

Mr. Shaefer, Executive Secretary of the Hadley Executive Committee, requests information from Ms. McDonald regarding Dr. King's scheduled lecture in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Roselyn Silverman

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Roselyn Silverman of Dr. King's availability to speak at the University of Toledo in Ohio. She also informs Miss Silverman that Dr. King will be out of the country writing a book, so further inquiries regarding "new invitations" will be made upon his return.

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Friday, March 8, 1968

The Martin Luther King Column (1)

Dr. King discusses the accomplishments of the Montgomery bus boycott, the challenges Negros will face, and the leadership skills of Ralph Abernathy.

New Harassment: The Lunacy Test by MLK

Saturday, June 23, 1962

Dr. King identifies events that demonstrate the absurd actions of the racist opposition during the Freedom Movement in the South.

Letter from Marc Pilisuk to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Marc Pilisuk, Associate Professor of Administrative Science and Psychology at Purdue University, requests Dr. King's permission to reprint the book "The Triple Revolution."

Letter from Reverend Charles G. Adams to a Fellow Minister about the Concord Towers Campaign

Monday, March 25, 1968

In this letter, Rev. Charles G. Adams requests financial donations to be used for the Concord Towers Campaign in Boston, which is a campaign to benefit certain families currently living in substandard dwellings.

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, March 4, 1968

This is the SCLC financial report for the week of March 4 through March 8, 1968. Income, disbursements, and bank balances from several banks are included in this document. Expenses from organizational projects, such as Voter Registration, the Washington Project and Operation Breadbasket, are also documented. A list of priorities and outstanding debts conclude the report.

Letter from C. M. Williams to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

In this letter, addressed to Reverend Ralph Abernathy, supporter C.M. Williams references Dr. King's funeral and requests a copy of his last speech. Many sympathizers and mourners wrote letters like this to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after Dr. King's assassination.

94:17 General Correspondence 1966(B)

Thursday, April 21, 1966

Mrs. Burke, a representative of the Wisconsin Council of Teachers of English, requests permission to reprint several exerts from the "I Have a Dream" address. The material will be included in the Johnson publication, entitled "The Day They Marched".

Letter from Charles Simpson to MLK and Chauncey Eskridge

Monday, December 18, 1967

Charles G. Simpson provides Dr. King with the financial outline surrounding the Stars for Freedom Reception and the Show at The Spectrum in Philadelphia.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

Humanism

Dr. King quotes Algernon Charles Swinburne's "Hymn of Man" and William Ernest Henley's "Invictus" as representative of humanist thought.

Doctrines

Dr. King records a definition of the word "doctrine."

Letter from The Pierre Berton Show to MLK

Thursday, September 17, 1964

Mrs. Elsa Franklin, program organizer for The Pierre Berton Show, invites Dr. King to be a guest on the program. She describes the show as "Canada's foremost television talk show."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. S.C. Njonjo

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

Dora McDonald responds to Mr. Njonjo's invitation for Dr. King to attend Kenya's Independence Celebration. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Njonjo that Dr. King is happy to accept the invitation.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.

Letter from James G. T. Fairfield to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967

"Alive" magazine editor James G. T. Fairfield expresses gratitude to Dr. King for sending a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here." Fairfield also sends several copies of his magazine, a publication of Mennonite Broadcasting which published an excerpt of Dr. King's "Riverside" speech.