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Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Saturday, March 18, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Secretary for the Hadley Executive Committee, writes Miss McDonald to finalize a date and place for Dr. King to give a lecture in support of the Hadley Memorial Fund.

Breadbasket Food Chain Sign Contract

Saturday, November 19, 1966

These articles highlight a contract that was signed by High Low Foods Inc. and Operation Breadbasket to increase the number of jobs for Negroes.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Saturday, October 1, 1966

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

104:3 General Correspondence 1967 (T)

Friday, April 21, 1967

Richard Tennent Jr. requests that Dr. King consider applying his efforts of non-violence to Cleveland, Ohio " help prevent the violence that seems inevitable." Tennent states that he cannot support the Reverend's stance on the Vietnam War, either financially or intellectually.

Letter from Annie Grace to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Thirteen-year-old Annie G. Miller expresses her admiration for Dr. King.

Laymen's Retreat League

Sunday, June 4, 1967

This letter from Thomas Gedeon serves as a response to a notion and tentative dates for a clergy retreat including Dr. King.

Telegram from Rev. Loe Champion to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Dr. King was the recipient of this Western Union telegram from Rev. Loe Champion of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket, an economic project of the SCLC. Rev. Champion sent this telegram to show support for Dr. King's struggles in the South. The correspondence was sent two days after a march Dr. King led in Memphis, Tennessee in support of striking sanitation workers.

MLK's Remarks to Swedish Audience

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Dr. King delivers a speech in Stockholm, Sweden applauding the nation's commitment and support of racial justice in America. King further articulates his belief that despite several social ills people will "be able to sing together in the not too distant future."

Letter from Max Hess to MLK

Monday, May 14, 1962

Mr. Hess expresses his sincere admiration for Dr. King stating, "you have done more than stood fast in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free."

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Sunday, March 12, 1967

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam outlines a list of requests for its members, including weekly communications and completed bus questionnaires.


Dr. King quotes a passage from Karl Barth's "Word of God and the Word of Man," regarding reason.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Mr. Rustin informs Dr. King that he has reached out to the American Jewish Committee and has included the appropriate person to recognize prior to the delivery of his speech.

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

Why Integration Won't Slow Up

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

This article featured in the St. Louis Post Dispatch is an extract from Dr. King's address at Cornell College. Dr. King discusses three attitudes that can be taken toward the question of progress in race relations: extreme optimism, extreme pessimism and the realistic position.

Augustine's Theory of Knowledge

Dr. King discusses St. Augustine's Theory of Knowledge. According to Augustine, "sense knowledge is the lowest level of knowledge."

Letter from Pamela Buckler to MLK

Monday, September 26, 1966

Ms. Buckler writes Dr. King requesting SCLC literature on Negro politics for her sociology paper.

Class Notes: Joshua

This eleven card series features Biblical verses from the Book of Joshua which Dr. King references under specific subject titles. The section titles range from "Knowledge" to "Passages for Homiletical Use."

Minutes of National Action Council Meeting

Sunday, July 1, 1962

The National Action Council, a sector of the Congress of Racial Equality, hosts a regional meeting in Miami, Florida where they will vote on council member positions, as well as regional and national NAC meeting logistics.


Dr. King discusses the danger of subjective religion without objective religion.

Telegram from SCLC to Ella Mae Moton

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Staff of the SCLC and Citizenship Education Program inform Ella Mae Moton that her expenses for the trip to Georgia will be taken care of.

Is It Wrong to Segregate?

Sunday, June 5, 1960

This Sermon titled "Is It Wrong to Segregate?" was delivered by the Reverend A. L. Kendrick on June 5, 1960. He expounds on several topics including equal rights, communism and the political element of the government.

Correspondence - Mrs. King from The Alumni Association of Antioch College/ Alumni Fund 4/26/60

Tuesday, April 26, 1960

This 1960 fundraising letter is from the Alumni Association of Mrs. King's alma mater, Antioch College. The fundraising committee for the Alumni Association sent this appeal to Mrs. King as a request for her continued support.

Letter from Ian Robertson to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966

Ian Robertson, President of the National Union of South African Students, writes Dr. King on behalf of the organization. He addresses the lack of acknowledgement to their previous letter and requests a copy and recording of Dr. King's speech.

Postcard Addressed to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

Father Martin Genghty of New York issued this postcard to Rev. Ralph Abernathy following Dr. King's assassination. The holy leader referred to Rev. Abernathy as "the Good Shepherd for his flock."

Letter from a Fellow American to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1967

This anonymous author expresses his concern regarding SNCC; explaining that the organization and its leaders have a communist backing. The author closes the letter with references to jobs, education, and a list of several small countries in need of assistance.

Letter from Jackie Robinson to MLK

Tuesday, October 9, 1962

Jackie Robinson writes Dr. King to accept a position of responsibility with the SCLC.

Letter from Otis J. Guidry to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Otis Guidry writes Dr. King requesting some campaign material "for an effective show of support for [his] candidacy" for the Choice '68 elections.

Letter from Edith Green to MLK

Monday, September 20, 1965

Representative Edith Greene writes Dr. King concerning his previous telegram about the Mississippi challenge. Green concludes by agreeing with Dr. King's stance for a delegate vote in Mississippi.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.