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Letter from MLK to William Ericson

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
New York (NY)

In this letter, Dr. King states his appreciation for the contribution made by Mr. Ericson to the SCLC Foundation. Dr. King goes on to express how grateful he is to have such support in the promotion of social change through non-violence.

Letter from Alfredo Gomez Gil to MLK

SWEDEN, Madrid, Spain

Sheila M. Rogers writes Dr. King in place of her friend Alfredo Gil, who has written a poem in Spanish about the plight of blacks. Rogers has translated the poem and sent it to Dr. King in support of the work he is doing for blacks in the United States.

Letter from Archie Crouch to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, CAMBODIA, THAILAND, North Carolina (NC), Massachusetts (MA), JAPAN, SOUTH KOREA, HONG KONG, TAIWAN, PHILIPPINES, MEXICO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, TANZANIA, GUATEMALA, PERU, CHILE, BOLIVIA, PLURINATIONAL STATE OF, COLOMBIA, KENYA, EL SALVADOR, BRAZIL, VENEZUELA, New Orleans, LA, Nashville, TN, Maryland (MD), Florida (FL), Colorado (CO), Montana (MT), GERMANY

Archie R. Crouch, of the Office for Communications, sends a personal letter to Dr. King using the United Presbyterian Church letterhead. He expresses his support for Dr. King's leadership against the Vietnam War and states that he meets many people that stand in opposition to the war. Crouch encloses recent issues of the publications New and Motive, which highlight the anti-war efforts taking place in the Presbyterian Church.

Letter from MLK to Ohio Senator Frank J. Lausche

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senator Frank J. Lausche (D-OH) for his support in passing the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Senator Lausche also served as Governor of Ohio.

Telegram from MLK to Eartha Kitt

Thursday, May 16, 1963
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King thanks singer-actress Eartha Kitt for her generous support and deep concern for the people of Birmingham, Alabama, and elsewhere in the South. He extends his appreciation to those in the Harlem Apollo Theatre who have contributed in response to her example.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 29, 1965
New York, NY

In this letter Ms. Daves covers several topics relating to dealings with publishers and the protocol in the future. She makes a number of recommendations on the allocation of Dr. King's time and resources and stresses the priority of "a constructive and continuing publishing program related to your work and ideas."

Letter from Arnold Krakower to MLK

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Attorney Arnold Krakower explains to Dr. King the reasons why he must reject a financial appeal to aid the SCLC. According to Krakower, Dr. King's position in the civil rights movement gave him high notoriety. However, once Dr. King turned his attention to oppose the war in Vietnam, Krakower believes he has no choice but to object mixing civil rights and foreign policy.

Letter from Calvin Kimbro to MLK

Monday, March 12, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Calvin Kimbro expresses his interest in famous African Americans and asks for a summary of Dr. King's life. Kimbro also wishes Dr. King luck and success in the near future.

Letter from Chuck Mittlestadt to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
New Mexico (NM), Iowa (IA), INDIA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Mr. Miittlestadt praises Dr. King for utilizing the "Gandhian technique of Satygagraha" in the Civil Rights Movement. He relates Dr. King to Mahatma Gandhi and Prime Minister of India, Jawaharlal Nehru. Mr. Mittlestadt also discusses the downfall of CORE, encloses a donation, and requests a photograph of Dr. King.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous author instructs Dr. King on how he should prepare his people for the end of the world.

Nonviolent Leaders

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King, Hosea Williams, and Bernard Lafayette are mentioned and photographed in a newspaper article that has been defaced by external drawings. The article is also covered in adverse commentary about the three leaders.

Letter to Mr. R.C. Firestone

Sunday, January 22, 1967
Albany, GA, Ohio (OH)

An unknown author writes to Mr. R. C. Firestone stating how delightful it is to hear that the Firestone Company plans to build a new plant in Albany, Ga.

MLK Statement on Voter Registration

Dr. King urges the African American community to register and vote. He outlines the importance of voting by making historcial references relevant to the community.

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

Indiana (IN)

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 17, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Minnesota (MN), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, New York (NY), Nebraska (NE)

Thousands of students from across the nation collectively organized a March on Washington to end the war in Vietnam. The students were attempting to voice their disapproval of the war and asked that conscientious individuals join them.

Letter from Pennsylvania State University to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 22, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA)

Nina C. Brown writes Dora McDonald on behalf of Pennsylvania State University to thank her for arranging Dr. King's trip to the school.

Letter from Mrs. Ruth Spencer to MLK

Sunday, August 27, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Mrs. Spencer shares her belief that "the Negro problem and the Vietnamese War are part of the same problem," though often concealed by news media propaganda. She expresses her gratitude towards Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy and offers her financial support.

Letter from Congressman James Roosevelt to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Representative James Roosevelt thanks Dr. King for his words regarding Roosevelt's contribution to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Jose Luis Villar Palasi to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
Madrid, Spain

Jose Luis Villar Palasi informs Dr. King tha that the Chair for Cultural Sociology has invited him to present at the Universidad of Madrid.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Monday, August 15, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, CANADA

An anonymous resident of Illinois informs Dr. King of their efforts to help co-workers understand the civil rights movement as a peaceful one. The writer offers encouragement to Dr. King and states hopefully in his/her lifetime equality for the Negro will be achieved.

Should F.E.P.C. Become a Federal Law?

In this draft article Dr. King discusses employment discrimination and the need for the Fair Employment Practices Commission to become legislation.

Invitation to MLK from Randolph Carter

Thursday, February 3, 1064
Washington, D.C.

Randolph Carter invites Dr. King to be the featured leader in a Conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Robinson to Rev. Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson send a sermon to Reverend Abernathy and his followers hoping to encourage them on their difficult days ahead.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968
Montgomery, AL, Philadelphia, PA, HONG KONG

Huntington writes to Dr. King concerning the separation of a mother and child in hospitals after birth. Huntington states, "If we get back to nature's ways in our hospitals instead of starting each new human life in America by rejecting it, as it were, I suspect the increase of juvenile delinquency would melt away."

Lorene Doss Request for MLK Assistance with a Class Project

Monday, February 19, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Lorene Doss, a high school senior at Sadie V. Thompson, requests the assistance of Dr. King on a project for her government class. The topic of her project is "What are the Main Causes of Poverty".

Memorandum from William A. Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette to SCLC Staff Members

Thursday, January 4, 1968
Atlanta, GA

William Rutherford and Bernard Lafayette inform the SCLC staff members of an impromptu retreat on the Poor People's Campaign, which will be held at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from James Gilliam to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1961
Mississippi (MS), Nashville, TN, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Gilliam sends Dr. King financial support in the amount of fifty dollars.

Letter from J.W. Augustus to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Louisiana (LA)

The Ad Hoc Committee for Good Government of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, issued this letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy requesting his assistance. Director of Political Action for the committee, J. W. Augustus, informed Rev. Abernathy of attempts by white city parish commissioners to buy the votes belonging to Negro political organizations.

Telegram from President John F. Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, June 12, 1963
Washington, D.C.

President John F. Kennedy invites Dr. King to a meeting of religious leaders to discuss the nation's civil rights problem.

Problem of Evil Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the problem of evil. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verse.