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Letter from Student Mobilization Committee

The Student Mobilization Committee petitions for help to protest the war in Vietnam.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Friday, May 12, 1967

Dr. King commends Mr. Shriver and the Office of Economic Opportunity for funding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association. Dr. King asserts that this decision is a positive step in the War on Poverty that will directly affect countless numbers of impoverished people.

Letter from Elliot J. Groszek to MLK

Elliot Groszek sends his support to Dr. King after hearing his speech in which he proposed that President Johnson sponsor a program for employment. Groszek finds King to be a revo-lutionary leader and would like for him to run for President of the United States.

The Nobel Couple

Thursday, December 10, 1964

The cover photo of the December 1964 issue of The American Chronicle captures Dr. and Mrs. King after they discover he was named the winner of the year's Nobel Peace Prize.

Tests of Great Music

Dr. King lists five criteria to use to evaluate whether a piece of music is great. Great music should hold its appeal over time, connect different experiences, foster a deeper life experience, unify history and integrate the individual personality.

Appeal to the President of the United States

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This document, prepared for the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, serves as a plea to President Kennedy and a legal brief. The plea is to use the centennial as an opportunity to "rededicate" the nation to the principles embedded in the Emancipation Proclamation; to make an executive order to end all statutory segregation and discrimination in the states; and to exercise full leadership protecting civil rights, including the use of force, if nonviolent methods fail.

Letter from Muriel N. Bishop to MLK

Saturday, November 2, 1963

Muriel N. Bishop, President of the Manitoba branch of Voice of Women, invites Dr. King to "address a public meeting" in Winnipeg at his earliest convenience. She expresses their interest in learning about his philosophy and efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King with Daughter Bernice (Bonnie). Atlanta, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

"Dr. King Warns Against the Riots"

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson, of the Atlanta Constitution, transcribed his analysis of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Mr. Patterson evaluated Dr. King's views on riots and agreed that riots did not produce any solid improvements to solve the problems in the Negro community.


Dr. King paraphrases one of Benito Mussolini's thoughts on fascism in "The Political and Social Doctrine of Fascism.

MLK Explains Nonviolent Resistance

Dr. King explores the underpinnings of nonviolent resistance by analyzing Thoreau's "On Civil Disobedience," the teachings of Gandhi and the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from 'Hardworking People' to MLK

A white American recommends a different approach to Civil Rights demonstrations. He believes that if celebrities are placed at the fore front of the marches that the black community would then be motivated to work.

Letter from Ernest M. Bettenson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Ernest M. Bettenson, the Registrar at the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, writes Miss McDonald to solidify arrangements for Dr. King's visit to the University. The sender informs Miss McDonald that tradition mandates meal arrangements for the recipient of an honorary degree and outlines several options to assist Dr. King in accommodating this practice.

God is Light

Dr. King prepares a sermon entitled, "God is Light." He refers to I John 1:5 during his preparation.

Letter from George D. Kelsey to MLK

Saturday, October 31, 1964

Dr. and Mrs. Kelsey applaud Dr. King on his nomination and receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Kelsey was Professor of Christian Ethics at Drew University.

Letter from Andrew Bell III and Fred Fechheimer to MLK

Wednesday, June 30, 1965

The "Americans in Ethiopia Who Support Civil Rights in the United States" committee sends its support and a monetary contribution to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.


Dr. King quotes Ames' 1933 book entitled "Art" regarding the topic of love. "Love is the true life of man. God is love, and the kingdom of God is within us."

Letter from Joan Daves Requesting the Table of Contents for "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, December 19, 1966

Here Joan Daves requests a table of contents for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here" in order to write a description for the catalog.

God the Inescapable

Dr. King references the book of Psalms regarding the topic "God the Inescapable." King speaks about man attempting to hide from God, but ultimately expresses that this impossible to do.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William S. Thompson

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to William Thompson's letter inviting Dr. King to address the National Bar Association. She explains that Dr. King's calendar shows that he will not be able to attend the event due to his travels.

Letter from Charles Woodall to MLK

Monday, February 8, 1965

Charles Woodall, representing the All Souls Unitarian Church of Santa Cruz, California, congratulates Dr. King on his efforts in the fight for freedom. Woodall explains that he is a Georgia native that once lived in Selma, Alabama in the early 1900's. At the time of this letter the SCLC and SNCC were in the middle of a massive Negro voter registration campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Telegram from Mr. Robert Lieberman to MLK about Denver Teachers Union

In this telegram, Mr. Lieberman writes to Dr. King requesting his support for an upcoming unionization vote by Denver public school teachers.

SCLC Action Committee Meeting

Monday, March 11, 1968

Dr. King writes to members of the Action Committee informing them of the date, time, and duties required for the meeting.

Who They are and Why They Struck

This article stresses the unfair treatment of twenty-two Claussen Bakery workers. This article also addresses why the workers went on strike.

Chicago Nonviolent Action Proposal

SCLC's proposal for a nonviolent action campaign in Chicago identifies the city as the prototype for the northern urban race problem. The proposal includes a snapshot of the situation in Chicago, past approaches, SCLC?s philosophy of social change, a description of twelve different aspects of the problem of economic exploitation, and a plan and timetable for mobilizing forces. Objectives are stated for the federal, state, and local levels. SCLC proposes to work in collaboration with the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations.

Letter from Labor Union President Michael Quill to MLK

Friday, November 30, 1962

Michael Quill, International President of the Transport Workers Union of America, encloses a copy of their 11th Constitutional Convention minutes to Dr. King. He also thanks him for his words at their convention and his contribution to the labor movement in America.

Telegram from Tina McDonald to MLK

Tina McDonald wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and is pleased to send God's blessings of courage and strength.

Letter from Theodore R. Britton Jr. to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Theodore R. Britton promotes the candidacy of Dr. King for the pastorship of Riverside Church throughout this letter. Britton also asserts that New York is in need of Dr. King's leadership and sermons.

Letter from C. Kenzie Steele to MLK

Tuesday, March 6, 1962

C. Kenzie Steele writes Dr. King to thank him for his "expression of encouragement" for the celebration of his Tenth Anniversary as pastor of Bethel Baptist Church.

Letter from Chip Hawkins to MLK

Monday, January 2, 1967

In this letter, Chip Hawkins questions Dr. King's affiliation with communist organizations and individuals. In addition, he requests that Dr. King publicly address the Communist accusations brought against him.