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How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil." In this sermon, King asserts that in many instances the facts of life contradicts a believer's faith, and poses reasons why one should hold firm to their faith.

Telegram from MLK to Hugh Shearer

JAMAICA

Dr. King sends a congratulatory telegram to Mr. Shearer for his elevation to Prime Minister of Jamaica.

Crisis of Culture

Dr. King refers to his note card on "morality" and cites an example of the crisis of culture.

Letter from William S. Minor to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965
Illinois (IL)

William Minor, the Director of The Foundation for Creative Philosophy, invites Dr. King to speak at The Society for Creative Ethics meeting in New York.

Letter from MLK to Rev. A C K Arbouin

Friday, May 5, 1967
New York (NY)

This letter is in response to and appreciation of contributions, made to the SCLC, by Reverend A C K Arbouin.

Freedom and Destiny

Dr. King discusses the topics of freedom and destiny as it relates to man.

Primacy of Events

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead’s view on the primacy of events over space and time.

King Seizure

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This article reports on the seizure of a Chicago property by Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Charles A. Melton

Monday, April 25, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King declines an invitation to visit Westchester, Pennsylvania due to the time he must devote to the Chicago campaign and helping political candidates in Alabama.

Letter from Melvin Arnold to MLK

Thursday, November 29, 1962
New York, NY

Melvin Arnold addressed this letter to Dr. King, inquiring about the publishing of his second book, "Stregnth to Love."This letter contains a request for Dr. King to negotiate a contract and deal with issues of royalties. Also included is Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in blue ink.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. E. A. Larson

Wednesday, August 14, 1963
Missouri (MO), RUSSIAN FEDERATION

Dora McDonald notifies Mrs. E. Larson of Dr. King's absence and informs her that he has never been to Russia, but has no objection to a visit there.

Letter from Ethel Love to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, May 9, 1961
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Love, program chairman of Warren Business and Professional Women's Club, responds to Ms. McDonald's previous letter regarding Dr. King's availability to speak in Warren, Ohio. Ms. Love ask Ms. McDonald to respond with "an approximate estimate of the likely fee."

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966
Washington (WA), Montgomery, AL

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Invitation Letter from Mrs. Frank K. Simms to MLK and CSK to Attend the 28th Annual Coference of the National Association of Ministers' Wives

Sunday, November 19, 1967
Chicago, IL

Mrs. Sims invites Dr. and Mrs. King to attend the 28th Annual Converence of the National Association of Ministers' Wives in Chicago IL.

Letter from MLK to Gleason Jackson Regarding Negro National Flag

Thursday, July 13, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mr. Jackson for designing a flag promoting unity among black people. Although Dr. Kings feels a flag such as this has implications of separatism, he encourages Mr. Jackson to continue publicizing his ideas regarding black unity.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Monday, February 24, 1964
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, MEXICO, CUBA, Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Michigan (MI), Louisiana (LA), Atlanta, GA, Minnesota (MN), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Missouri (MO), Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Louisville, KY, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Texas (TX), INDIA, Florida (FL), Tallahassee, FL, Detroit, MI, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA, Pittsburgh, PA, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informed Dr. King that “Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" would not be able to be converted into a paperback book. Joan Daves is Dr. King’s literary agent.

Importance of the Public Accommodations Section of the Civil Rights Bill

Atlanta, GA

This document features a story of a white civil rights worker who was fined and sentence to jail because she sought to eat with her Negro friends in a restaurant in Atlanta.

150 Religious Leaders March on OEO

Friday, October 14, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

This press release addresses Sargent Shrivers' decision not to refund the Child Development Group of Mississippi and to express concerns regarding the National War on Poverty.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967
New York, NY

Bayard Rustin writes to Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference sponsored by the A. Philip Randolph Education Fund. The conference focuses on "The Role of Press in a Period of Social Crisis."

Invitation to MLK from Washington North Idaho Conference of the United Church of Christ

Monday, November 8, 1965
Washington (WA), Idaho (ID), Chicago, IL

Archie Hook invites Dr. King to be the guest preacher at the Annual Meeting of the Washington North Idaho Conference of the United Church of Christ.

Unwise and Untimely?

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, New Orleans, LA, New York (NY), Texas (TX), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

MLK - Form Letter Draft

Dr. King writes a form letter to acknowledge the "sacrifices, fasting, and prayer" from people throughout the world.

Letter from Cornell's L. Paul Jaquith to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1960
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

L. Paul Jaquith writes Dr. King regarding his upcoming visit to Cornell University. The student body seeks to discuss issues relating to the inequality of opportunities for Negroes in the United States.

Statement to SCLC Board About Alabama Boycotts

Friday, April 2, 1965
Baltimore, MD

In this statement, Dr. King explains the need for a boycott of the state of Alabama because of extreme violence and police overreaction, which he calls "totalitarian."

Letter to MLK from Raymond Brown

Sunday, December 10, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Raymond Brown writes to Dr. King admonishing him for his affiliations with Adam Clayton Powell and Stokely Carmichael and hopes that these associations are temporary.

Moral Law

Dr. King documents a statement from the Federal Council of Churches concerning the significance of moral law. King writes, "This statement from the Federal Council of Churches is pertinent."

Letter to MLK from Violet Calvert

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Washington (WA)

Violet Calvert expresses to Dr. King that she has little money but she uses letters to fight for equality. She shows Dr. King a copy of one of her published letters.

Black Power

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN)

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Letter from Dr. Alvaro Palmeira to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964
BRAZIL, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Dr. Palmeira, Grand Master of the Grande Orient of Brazil, offers his congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.