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"SIERRA LEONE"

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Smith

Friday, July 31, 1964

Dora McDonald writes William Smith of Fullerton Junior College on behalf of Dr. King, granting permission to reprint material from Time magazine regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

MLK Statement in Support of Labor Union

Thursday, June 11, 1959

This 1959 statement on behalf of the United Packing House Workers Union is one of many Dr. King wrote supporting unions and the Labor Movement.

Antisemitism

An anonymous group issues a public statement addressing the rising issue of antisemitism throughout the world. According to the document, Soviet Jewry are facing "cultural extinction." As a result, Soviet relations have worsened in Israel. The group indicates that the policies of the U.S.S.R. have caused this wave of antisemitic discrimination and a nation-wide effort will have to help eradicate the movement.

Class Notes

Dr. King references several biblical scriptures regarding topics of ethics, knowledge, man, sin and God.

Letter from Kathy Sasso to MLK

Kathy Sasso, a student at Public School 30 in Staten Island, New York, notifies Dr. King that her class read his "I Have a Dream" speech and named him "Person of the Week." Sasso also requests a copy of one of Dr. King's speeches.

Letter from Reverend Durstan R. McDonald to MLK Regarding an Invitation

Friday, March 15, 1968

The Hobart and William Smith Colleges have brought influential leaders to their campus from the civil rights and black power movements. Many students desire a further understanding of the Gospel and have requested to invite Dr. King to speak. The dates provided for this engagement are unfortunately subsequent to the assignation of Dr. King.

Anticipated Public School Desegregation in Southern and Border States

Thursday, August 22, 1957

This memorandum provides a list of schools and school systems expected to desegregate in September of 1957. The Southern Regional Council, Inc. also includes vital information concerning pending Negro applications for school admittance and schools actively involved in litigation.

Telegram From Mrs. Mary Kru to MLK

Saturday, March 12, 1966

In this telegram, Mrs. Mary Kru writes to Dr. King, "your plans of operation put me out of work".

Letter from Fr. John McNamara to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

Fr. McNamara, Catholic Chaplain at the Louisiana State Prison at Angola, writes Dr. King to extend congratulations on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Student Jacquelyn Gravely

Wednesday, March 18, 1964

Dora McDonald refers Allen High School student Jacquelyn Gravely to read "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Crusader Without Violence" for her school assignment. She conveys Dr. King's good wishes towards Gravely's academic career.

Who is Truly Great

Dr. King addresses the subject of individual greatness within society and how to truly go about achieving such a status. He begins by dispelling common signifiers of greatness before indicating that greatness can only be substantively measured through the ability to put others before self. Dr. King cites the life of Jesus Christ as an example of humility culminating into greatness.

Letter from Catherine Aller to MLK

Thursday, May 12, 1966

Catherine Aller writes Dr. King regarding his awareness of agape and its "historic appearance on the Day of Pentecost."

Letter from Tony Schrader to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

Tony Schrader informs Dr. King that his college is sponsoring a primary on campus for Choice '68. Schrader requests "any free campaign materials or statements of policies of Dr. King."

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Francis Robinson

Wednesday, May 25, 1966

Mrs. King expresses her appreciation for the opera tickets that Mr. Robinson gave to her and Dr. King.

Fifth Grade Students Write to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Fifth Graders at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, write to Dr. King in request of literature about his style of worship.

Letter from Ethelyn Hall to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Ethelyn L. Hall, a student at the University of Houston, writes Dr. King in reference to SCLC's distribution of literature. Hall is preparing a term paper for a sociology class and requests any available literature relating to civil rights, interracial relations, and racism. She is also interested in learning the purposes and functions of the SCLC.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Morehouse Anniversary

Friday, January 13, 1967

In this letter, President Mays invites Dr. King to Morehouse's 100th Anniversary celebration.

Letter from Vice President Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Crisis in Detroit

Thursday, August 3, 1967

In this letter, Vice President of the United States of America, Hubert Humphrey, writes to Dr. King to thank him for his statements promoting nonviolence in the crisis situation in Detroit, Michigan.

The Martin Luther King Column

This column, written by Dr. King, depicts his philosophy on the complete human life. He describes life to have three separate, yet connected dimensions. These dimensions are denoted as: length, breadth, and height. All are defined in great detail according to the Reverend's belief and experiences.

Letter from Tom Cochran to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966

Tom Cochran, President of the Young Democrats at the University of Georgia School of Law writes to invite Dr. King to speak as a lecturer. According to Mr. Cochran, the political climate in the state of Georgia has increased the urgency for Dr. King to speak at the institution.

Letter from J.H. Wheeler to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965

The secretary of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees writes to Dr. King, enclosing the minutes of their meeting of April 10, 1965.

Letter to Dorothy Height from Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Dora McDonald apologizes to Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, for not responding sooner to let her know that Dr. and Mrs. King would be unable to attend the Premier Life Membership Dinner. The invitation to the dinner came during Dr. King's sabbatical to write a new book.

Letter from The Downtown Charity Club to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

The Downtown Charity Club wishes to accompany Dr. King from the Baltimore headquarters for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

Nature of Religion

Dr. King indicates Schleiermacher's view on the nature of religion.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."

Join the Ranks! Support A Worker

An SCLC field worker writes to gain support for the SCLC so that the organization can fulfill its mission to help blacks "achieve full citizenship rights, stimulate nonviolent mass action, and secure the right to vote."

City of Cleveland: Division of Housing Codes

The City of Cleveland Division of Housing Codes lists the general maintenance requirements surrounding the local living environments. These qualifications specify premises must be free from infestation of pests and maintained in a clean and sanitary condition. This is the responsibility of both the owner and occupant, and offense penalties will be enforced. Dr. King creates notes surrounding these codes, which involves the 14th amendment, Declaration of Independence and more.

Letter from William T. Chapman to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965

William T. Chapman, a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity of Knoxville College, requests Dr. King's response concerning his involvement with their program.

Social Ethics

Dr. King's references a chapter and verse from the biblical Book of Zephaniah. He notes that the passages concerning social phenomena such as infidelity, pride, selfishness and oppression are still "entirely up to date."

Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination. Memphis, 1968

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)