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Letter from Joseph Merchant to the Editor of the New York Times

Saturday, October 22, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Mississippi (MS)

Mr. Merchant writes to the editor of the New York Times concerning Sargent Shriver's commitment to the poor of Mississippi. Mr. Merchant is concerned with the fact that Mr. Shriver did not refund the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM).

Is It Wrong to Segregate?

Sunday, June 5, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), ETHIOPIA, Texas (TX), CUBA

This Sermon titled "Is It Wrong to Segregate?" was delivered by the Reverend A. L. Kendrick on June 5, 1960. He expounds on several topics including equal rights, communism and the political element of the government.

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy's Statement Following MLK's Assasination

Sunday, April 7, 1968
Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C., Tennessee (TN)

Rev. Abernathy acknowledges the deep pain and anger those in SCLC feel at the senseless taking of Dr. King’s life. They pledge that his work and commitment to nonviolence will continue. They are as much against violence, says Abernathy, as they are against racial and economic injustice. He announces that Mrs. King will join him in leading a march in Memphis in support of the sanitation workers and that the Poor People’s Campaign will proceed. He calls upon Congress to respond to the major loss represented by Dr.

Telegram from F. D. Jones to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Reverend F. D. Jones congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Project "C" Progress Report

Thursday, March 28, 1963
Johannesburg, South Africa, GEORGIA, Chicago, IL, New York (NY), Boston, MA, Dallas, TX, Detroit, MI, Philadelphia, PA

Detailed progress report on a project that is referred to as Project "C."

MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

MLK Press Conference and Speech Notes

Cleveland, OH, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King stresses that his appearance to Cleveland is not in the interest of the candidates but to urge the people to exercise their political and moral responsibility.

J.H. Emms to MLK

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), New York, NY

J.H. Emms offers his approval and support to Dr. King regarding his position on Civil Rights and the Vietnam problem, which were expressed at speeches in Los Angeles and New York.

Letter from MLK to Hugh W. Nevin Jr.

Wednesday, November 20, 1963
Rhode Island (RI)

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Hugh Nevin's letter inviting him to speak at St. George's School. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to his full calendar and thanks Mr. Nevin for his nice words regarding his book, "Stride Towards Freedom."

Declaration of "Nobel Peace Prize Day" Desired

Virginia (VA), Norfolk, VA

This press release announces the Virginia State Unit of the SCLC's appeal to Governor Albertis Harrison in hopes that he will establish a "Nobel Peace Prize Day" in honor of Dr. King. The proposed day will possibly be held in conjunction with a speech Dr. King will deliver at Virginia State College and the Virginia SCLC State Convention.

Letter from Mrs. Weitzler to Bayard Rustin

Friday, January 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), VIETNAM

Mrs. Weitzler assesses the meaning of the "March on Washington" and the impact it has had on her.

Letter from Fitzhugh Mullan to MLK

Wednesday, August 17, 1966
Chicago, IL, California (CA), Boston, MA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Los Angeles, CA

Fitzhugh Mullan, the Chairman of the Student Health Organization of Chicago, asks Dr. King to be an advisor to the organization. Nationwide, the student health movement has worked in the ghettos of Los Angeles, with California migrant farmworkers, and in three Southern states.

Letter from Loretta Dun to the SCLC

Monday, December 16, 1963

Loretta Dunn, secretary for the Providence for Civil Rights, Inc., contributes to the SCLC for their efforts in the field of civil rights.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

Monday, February 10, 1958

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

Monday, May 24, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL

Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.


Dr. King quotes Ferre's view on religion.

Letter from D. McDonald to Prafulla Chandra Das

Monday, March 6, 1967

In this response letter regarding a request for a prefatory message from Dr. King, Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's personal secretary, cites his extensive obligations in conveying regrets. It became increasingly common for Dr. King to decline such requests as his work and mission progressed.

Interview with MLK for Radio Norway


Dr. King shares the way that Americans celebrate Christmas.


Dr. King quotes Alfred Tennyson on the topic of immortality.

MLK Sermon: The Dimensions of A Complete Life

Sunday, April 19, 1959

In this sermon given at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, Dr. King details the three dimensions of a complete life: length, breadth, and height.

MLK Statement Before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders

Monday, October 23, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King makes a public statement before the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder. He addresses five causes of the recent riots: hite backlash, unemployment, discriminatory practices, war, and features peculiar to big cities.

Newsletter Regarding Operation Breadbasket

Florida (FL), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This letter serves as an informational letter on the efforts of Operation Breadbasket. According to the letter, this organization, has provided over 900 jobs for Negroes, opened up services for Negro businessmen and offered other types of assistance.


Dr. King defines worship.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. H. L. Wynter

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Dora McDonald communicates to Mr. H. L. Wynter that Dr. King will be able to attend his baccalaureate service for the University of the West Indies.

Letter from Rev. Oliver W. Holmes to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 23, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Reverend Oliver Holmes confirms the possibility of a meeting between Dr. King and Mrs. Leonard Faber, a graduate student in religion. Her dissertation involves Dr. King, German monk and theologian Martin Luther and Jewish philosopher Martin Buber.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion."

Wall Street Journal: Letter to Editor from J. Chico Ramos

Monday, July 22, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mexican- American J. Chico Ramos gives his opinion to the Editor of The Wall Street Journal on racial issues in America. He objects to the claims that the Civil Rights Movement is going to help all minorities, because while they may benefit negroes, he doesn't feel they have ever benefitted anyone of his own nationality.

Letter from Susan Neisuler to MLK

Sunday, August 14, 1966
New York, NY

Susan Neisuler encourages Dr. King to speak out against anti-semitism, for there are many Jews who believe that "black power" means anti-semitism.

Letter from Pierre C. Armand to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968
New York (NY), HAITI, GUINEA, Brooklyn, NY

Mr. Armand writes Dr. King concerning the goals of The Haitian Community Center in New York City. The Center attempts to institute programming in order to alleviate the various difficulties of the Haitian community. Mr. Armand also invites Dr. King to speak at a distinguished event as an honorary guest.

William James

Dr. King briefly discusses philosopher William James and his lectures entitled "The Variety of Religious Experience."