Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"SLOVAKIA"

Letter from Bo Wirmark to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
Atlanta, GA, SWEDEN, Chicago, IL

Bo Wirmark writes Dr. King to clarify the misconception behind Vilgot Sjoman's film "I Am Curious (Yellow)," and explain how his interview is being used in the film. Wirmark also extends an invitation for Dr. King to visit Uppsala, Sweden.

Letter from Bill Dady to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1964
Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, New York (NY)

In this letter, "Free Men and Free Markets," a book by Robert Theobald, is introduced to Dr. King by Bill Dady.

Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council, Inc. Presents MLK

Sunday, April 19, 1964
Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL)

This document contains a program for Tallahassee's Inter-Civic Council's mass planning meeting for a three-day workshop on nonviolence at Bethel Baptist Church. Also included in this document are lyrics to "Lift Every Voice and Sing," and "We Shall Overcome."

Telegram from Stanley Levison to Coretta Scott King

Friday, January 17, 1969
ITALY

Stanley Levison warns Mrs. King about interceding between governments.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

Worship

Dr. King describes the challenge of the Protestant Church as finding a balance between objective and subjective worship.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Lucks Regarding Assistant Pastor

In this letter, Dr. King advises Rev. Lucks on choosing an assistant pastor.

Adverse Letter to MLK

Atlanta, GA

In this letter, opposition is asserted as the author places into question Dr. King's decency and religion.

Letter from Representative Stanley R. Tupper to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Maine Congressman Stanley R. Tupper acknowledges his receipt of Dr. King's telegram concerning the Washington D. C. Home Rule Bill. He informs Dr. King that he will sign the discharge petition for the bill if it remains obstructed by a committee for much longer.

Letter from MLK to Agnes Mack

Sunday, December 10, 0196
Florida (FL), Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Dr. King sends Agnes Mack a form to complete so that she may receive a copy of the "I have a Dream" speech.

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Monday, March 11, 1968
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

Our Struggle

Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Telegram from George Field to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963
New York, NY

In this telegram, George Field, Executive Director of Freedom House, was willing to set a new date for their civil rights dinner, so that Dr. King would be able to attend.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Florida (FL)

In this article from the Miami Florida Herald, the writer summarizes a portion of the book "Why We Can't Wait", written by Dr. King.

The Transcendental Dialectics

Dr. King writes on the "soul" and the "world" as two ideas of reason. He speaks to the human tendency to apply the categories of quantity, quality, relation, and modality to our understanding of the self. King ends these notes by contemplating "two absolutely contradictory propositions [that] seem to be established by the refutation of the other."

Mysticism

Dr. King cites Psalms 17:15, surmising that the vision of God is a mystical union with God.

Letter from Mrs. Edna E. Williams to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mrs. Edna E. Williams invites Dr. King to attend The Friendship Baptist Church's annual Harry W. Knight Award and Mortgage Retirement Fund Banquet.

Letter from Harry Grossweiner to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York (NY)

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Harry Grossweiner, Executive Vice President of Friends of Father Pire, Inc., expressed to Dr. King that he thought Dr. King would be interested in Father Pire's new book, and also indicated that any comments or suggestion would be appreciated.

Invitation to MLK from London Methodist Youth Organization

Monday, May 15, 1967
Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, London, England, Berlin, Germany, INDIA, PAKISTAN

Greater London Youth and Community Service invites Dr. King to participate in a London to Canterbury Pilgrimage by leading a study on human rights and the church and preaching a sermon.

Telegram from Mrs. Mary L. Ayler to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Illinois (IL)

This telegram is an expression of support and encouragement from Mrs. Ayler of Murphysboro, IL, to Dr. King while he was incarcerated in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Edna R. McKinnon

Wednesday, December 20, 1967
California (CA)

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Edna McKinnon expressing deep appreciation for her generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He continues to say that the work of the organization is strengthened by such support.

The Prayer of St. Francis of Assisi

Mr. and Mrs. Roberts sends a card bearing the Prayer of St. Francis of Assisi.

Letter from MLK to Arthur B. Jestice

Thursday, December 21, 1967
London, England

Dr. King declines a speaking engagement at the St. Andrew's Street Baptist Church due to some "programmatic plans." Dr. King asks if it is possible to meet in the future.

Letter from Senator Edward V. Long to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Senator Edward V. Long (D-Missouri) writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter concerning Long's support of the civil rights bill.

MLK Writes to Mrs. King from Jail

Tuesday, October 25, 1960
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes this letter to Coretta Scott King after recently being transferred to a state prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He expresses understanding of how the present circumstances are difficult for his family, particularly given Coretta's pregnancy with their third child, Dexter Scott King. King goes on to encourage Coretta to maintain strength and says that their excessive suffering will serve the greater purpose of freedom. He asks her to come visit him and requests that she bring several books, a collection of sermons and a radio.

Letter from Stanley M. Voice to MLK

Saturday, February 25, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Stanley M. Voice writes to inform MLK why he is withdrawing support for SCLC in 1967. He thinks Negro leaders need a unified sense of direction.

Handwritten notecard regarding Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from SNCC's Dorothy Miller to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Greenwood, MS

Dorothy Miller of SNCC writes Dr. King informing him of the arson attempt at the SNCC office and thanks him for a previous correspondence regarding the case of Bob Zellner.

A Blind Woman's Request for MLK

New York, NY

Juilia Lockheart, a blind 75 year old woman, requests aid from Dr. King. Many people envisioned Dr. King to be the savior of their time; they would contact him with unrelated requests outside of the non-violent movement in hopes that he could be the remedy to their current issue.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Tuesday, September 25, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), ITALY, CANADA

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.