Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"SLOVAKIA"

The Philosophy Of Nonviolence And the Tactic Of Nonviolent Resistance

This document discusses the philosophy and tactic of nonviolence. The three nonviolent resisters discussed are Jesus, Gandhi, and Dr. King.

Letter from Joan Daves to Howard Gotlieb

Monday, May 15, 1967

Joan Daves responds to Mr. Gotlieb regarding a request to write Dr. King's biography from archival material in the possession of Boston University. At the present time and for various reasons, Dr. King has decided not to approve this project.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to MLK

Thursday, January 12, 1967

Mr. Wachtel informs Dr. King that a large donation made by Mrs. Ann Farnsworth is now available. Wachtel then asks Dr. King who is to send the acknowledgment.

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.

The Free Southern Theater

The Free Southern Theater was co-founded by members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. They toured throughout the South, performing free of charge in Negro communities that had no theater, as a cultural and education extension of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Senator Thomas H. Kuchel to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

California Republican Senator Thomas H. Kuchel writes Dr. King thanking him his letter celebrating the recent passage in the Senate of the Civil Rights bill.

Business Reply Envelope from Morehouse College

This document is a postcard invitation to a breakfast at Morehouse College. Dr. King served as a member on the Morehouse Board of Trustees.

SCLC: MLK Still Most Influential Negro According to Studies

Friday, November 3, 1967

The SCLC issues a news release stating that Dr. King is the most influential Negro leader in America. Dr. King, along with other prominent members of the SCLC, was serving a five-day jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama at the time of the news release.

Letter from Lenore Aikens to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964

Lenore Aikens congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She also asks how the Christian Citizenship Committee of United Church Women can be a part of the cause.

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964

R. Lennox, a principal at Presbyterian College in Montreal, Canada, invites Dr. King to speak on ministry at the college's 100th anniversary convocation address.

Letter from Minnie Summers Lindsey to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mrs. Lindsey asks Dr. King for a copy of a speech she recently heard on the radio and his "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from MLK to Alan Bible

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Alan Bible, a United States Senator from Nevada, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Esther G. Stone to MLK

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Esther G. Stone writes to Dr. King to express her opinions on Negro leadership, American politics, and the Vietnam War. Stone writes that President Lyndon Johnson has done so much for Negroes and that Mrs. Johnson did not deserve the hurtful remarks of Eartha Kitt.

The Function of the Field Staff

Tuesday, July 10, 1962

The Department of Organization in the Congress of Racial Equality releases a memorandum detailing the function of the field staff position. The responsibilities include stimulating new activity for the group and acting as a consultant.

Liberalism

Dr. King notes a view of liberalism in Harry Emerson Fosdick’s “The Modern Use of the Bible.”

MSGR. Victor G. Moser's Statements Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Monday, April 26, 1965

Victor G. Moser recounts the activities that took place during the march on Montgomery ,which was one of a serious, dedicated, even religious commitment to a project which would really bring out the serious injustice being perpetrated upon a persecuted and disadvantaged people.

Mississippi Project

The Mississippi Project is developed by SNCC which rooted from the evident white supremacy in this state. The organization sought to take action to eradicate the societal restrictions of the American Negro. The summer project will involve voter registration, freedom schools, community centers, and many more sectional projects.

Dogmatics

Dr. King records a note on the function of dogmatic theology and a quote from Karl Barth's "Church Dogmatics: The Doctrine of the Word of God."

Salem Baptist Church Worship Service Program

Sunday, September 11, 1960

Dr. King attends Salem Baptist Church in Jenkintown, Pennsylvania as a guest speaker.

Man

Dr. King quotes Psalms 144:4 and comments briefly on this biblical passage.

Appeal to the President of the United States

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This document, prepared for the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, serves as a plea to President Kennedy and a legal brief. The plea is to use the centennial as an opportunity to "rededicate" the nation to the principles embedded in the Emancipation Proclamation; to make an executive order to end all statutory segregation and discrimination in the states; and to exercise full leadership protecting civil rights, including the use of force, if nonviolent methods fail.

Man

Dr. King notes the subject of man, quoting Algernon Charles Swinburne's "The Hymn of Man."

Letter from Donald W. Morgan to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964

Donald Morgan informs Dr. King that northern locations such as New England and Vermont experience racial issues. Mr. Morgan serves as the chairman of the program committee for the 1964 Annual Meeting of the Vermont Congregational Conference. Dr. King is extended an invitation to speak at this conference which is located at the Rutland Congregational Church.

Conditions for Entering the Kingdom

Dr. King opens these sermon notes by discussing a child's behavior and actions. According to King, "a child has the inexhaustible capacity to forgive" and is inquisitive, honest, and open-minded. These are characteristics that adults should possess, which would help them gain entry into the Kingdom.

Official Religious Representatives Attending MLK Funeral

This document contains a list of official religious representatives who will attend Dr. King's funeral.

Martin Luther King....At Communist Training School

Monday, June 17, 1963

This advertisement printed in the Augusta Courier accuses Dr. King and several constituents of communist involvement.

Letter to MLK concerning nonviolent approaches

Friday, August 12, 1966

Mrs. Ettinger offers Dr. King advice on a alternative approach to advance human rights. She also explains how it is up to blacks within the communities to make a better effort towards equality.

Letter from John O. Killens to MLK About a Book Party

Sunday, September 14, 1958

In this letter, Killens discusses the possibility of a book party in Dr. King's honor. Killens, Ruby Dee, Lofton Mitchell, Ossie Davis, and Harry Belafonte are exploring this idea and believe that at this event many books would be sold and the message of civil rights could be communicated to thousands.

Letter from Pat Mutzberg to Dora McDonald Regarding Meeting

Friday, June 9, 1967

Pat Mutzberg of the Atlanta Committee for International Visitors writes Miss McDonald to confirm Dr. King's upcoming appointment with Nigerian visitors.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Sunday, June 23, 1963

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.