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John Cowles Views on Asia

Dr. King records the views of John Cowles, chairman of Look magazine and president of the Minneapolis Star-Tribune. Cowles stated that the US is losing its grip on "the minds of men" worldwide, thanks in part to the US' inability to express sympathy for the Asian community after World War II.

Card from Sophia Anderson to MLK

Mrs. Sophia Anderson wishes Dr. King a speedy recovery.

Letter from Harold Eggers to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

In this letter Harold Eggers, a White supremacist, criticizes the African American race, for what Eggers perceives as an inability to recognize "real leadership ability." However, he does this while commending Dr. King for possessing "real leadership ability."

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Monday, May 10, 1965

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

Letter from L. K. Jackson to President Kennedy

Dr. Jackson produces a copy of this telegram sent to President John F. Kennedy, in which he requests the president use his executive power to suppress violent racial tensions in the South. This telegram was prompted by the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four little girls.

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm to MLK about a Humanity Button

Friday, March 1, 1968

In this letter Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm enclose a button called the "Pentagon of Humanity," which the Heussenstamm's also sent to the President and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Accordingly the symbol represents “love, unity and wisdom—the community of man.”

Thank You Note from Atlanta Braves' President to MLK and Coretta Scott King

Friday, October 27, 1967

William C. Bartholomay, chairman and president of the Atlanta Braves, thanks Mr. and Mrs. King for sending him a recording of the "March on Washington."

Negroes Hurl Rocks; Cops, Drivers Hurt

An anonymous critic comments on a headline story that details a riot in Lansing, Michigan. Two additional reports are featured in the newspaper clipping including a short piece on Dr. King's visit to Jackson, Mississippi for a four day SCLC convention and a union convention in Kansas City, Missouri.

Letter from Senator Edward V. Long to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Senator Edward V. Long (D-Missouri) writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter concerning Long's support of the civil rights bill.

Letter from Hugh Bingham to MLK

Friday, April 22, 1966

Hugh Bingham, Associate Editor of the London Daily Mirror, requests help planning his trip to the United States to report on the "progress and processes of integration." He explains that, in addition to the political aspects of integration, he would also like to write about the people involved in the movement.

Newsday: Poor Listeners

Tuesday, November 15, 1966

The writer issues an indictment of the current Presidential administration for its failure to listen to others' views of the situation in Vietnam.

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Time to Retire

Tuesday, November 20, 2012

This New York Times article advocates the mandatory retirement of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover upon his 70th birthday. The article specifically references Director Hoover's description of Dr. King as "the most notorious liar in the country."

Letter from MLK to Arline Young

Thursday, March 22, 1962

Dr. King responds to Ms. Young's previous letter that discussed the difficulty of engaging people in voter registration efforts.


Dr. King explains the philosophy of existentialism.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Friday, December 3, 1965

Vice President Humphrey thanks Dr. King for participating in a recent White House Conference, "To Fulfill These Rights," which focused on jobs, jobs training and economic security.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rosa A. King

Thursday, July 12, 1962

Miss McDonald informs Rosa King that Dr. King will be unable to speak at Central Baptist Church.

Dr. King Notecard

In this notecard, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoint pertaining to the doctrine of "Puritanism."

MLK Statement Regarding an Attack on the First Amendment

Monday, October 30, 1967

Dr. King addresses violations of First Amendment Rights in this statement regarding the events at Birmingham, Alabama in 1963.

Letter from Lance Redford to Mrs. King

Lance Redford, a student in New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King.

Telegram from Washington CORE to MLK

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

The Washington CORE asks Dr. King to clear up the apparent misunderstanding that Dr. King approves of Coleman for the fifth circuit.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. H. L. Wynter

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Dora McDonald communicates to Mr. H. L. Wynter that Dr. King will be able to attend his baccalaureate service for the University of the West Indies.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

Atlanta Operation Breadbasket Bi-Annual Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Reverend Fred C. Bennette, Jr. issues the bi-annual report for the Atlanta Chapter of Operation Breadbasket. Reverend Bennette expounds on the mission of Dr. King and the SCLC to create economic opportunities through advances in employment.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Carolyn W. Ferriday

Wednesday, July 20, 1966

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Carolyn Ferriday for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from William L. Harris to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968

William Harris, vice-chairman of the Extra Legal Forum at the Law School of the University of Virginia, invites Dr. King to speak at a Forum event.

MSGR. Victor G. Moser's Statements Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Monday, April 26, 1965

Victor G. Moser recounts the activities that took place during the march on Montgomery ,which was one of a serious, dedicated, even religious commitment to a project which would really bring out the serious injustice being perpetrated upon a persecuted and disadvantaged people.

Letter from Martha Roberts to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Martha Roberts, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, chastises Dr. King for leading marches and speaking against the war in Vietnam. She expresses to Dr. King that his focus should be on teaching "your people" to learn trades, enhance education and accept gradual change.

Letter from Mount Olivet Tabernacle Baptist Church to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Pastor Marshall L. Shepard invites Dr. King to the Dedication Service for the Mount Olivet Village Corporation in Philadelphia.