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"SOUTH AFRICA"

Error

This set of note cards written by Dr. King explores the causation of error. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "The Concept of Nature" noting several reasons as to the rise of error.

Letter from Walter G. Pietsch to MLK

Thursday, January 12, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Walter G. Peitsch asks Dr. King to support a resolution to reinstate Adam Clayton Powell to his seat in the United States House of Representatives and his Chairmanship of the United States Committee on Education and Labor.

Letter from Carl Shipley to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Carl Shipley, Head of the Republican State Committee for the District of Columbia, thanks Dr. King for his address at the National Press Club. Shipley expresses that despite the reservations of many individuals regarding Dr. King's emphasis on civil disobedience, the overall support of his speech was highly satisfactory.

Class Notes

Dr. King references several biblical scriptures regarding topics of ethics, knowledge, man, sin and God.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Letter from Reverend Virgil W. Glanton to SCLC

Saturday, June 18, 1966
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

In this letter, Reverend Virgil Glanton gives a contribution to SCLC and offers support for the Meredith March.

The Dilemma of The Negro

Saturday, January 29, 1966
Tuskegee, AL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King provides an outlook on the social and political plight of the contemporary Negro. He claims "The challenge is the fact that society expects, indeed demands, that the Negro be as productive, as resourceful, as skillful and as responsible as his white brother who is not handicapped by oppression". He urges Negro citizens to capitalize on current opportunities for advancement. "The negro must not wait until the dawn of absolute emancipation...".

Statistics on Birmingham, Alabama

Birmingham, AL

This sheet shows Negro vs. White Populations in Birmingham, Alabama in regards to voting. It also shows the working wages of the Negro Population according to an article in the Saturday Evening Post.

Telegram from MLK to Mattie Tillman

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King expresses his condolences to Mattie Tillman for the death of her husband. Dr. King states that he will always be remembered for his influence in the Atlanta University community.

Transformed Nonconformist

In this draft of the "Transformed Nonconformist", Dr. King urges the abandonment of societal practices of injustice.

Religion

This document is a notecard titled "Religion," in which Dr. King expounds on John Dewey's definition of religion in "A Common Faith" as a "purely ethical meaning" of religion.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Maurice DeCuir to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York, NY

In this letter, Maurice De Cuir expresses his concern, in regard to race relations, as it pertains to government jobs in helping the economic status of the negro. He then informs Dr. King of the intent, of the Equal Opportunity Commission, to investigate the matter.

The Business Card of the Honorable Al Shabazz (Malcolm X)

New York, NY

During the late 1950s, Malcolm X began going by Malik Al-Shabazz. Shabazz, according to the Nation of Islam, was a Black Nation in central Africa from which all human beings descended. While the date of this card is unknown, it is presumed to be circa the late 1950s to early 1960s, before Malcolm X split from the Nation of Islam in 1964.

Letter from Pastor Paul S. Barru to MLK

Friday, May 21, 1965
Colorado (CO), Denver, CO, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

The pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Glenwood Springs, Colorado sends the SCLC a contribution on behalf of his church and the Denver Christian Center. He references a recent Wilcox County, Alabama tour which he feels reflects the type of "creative" activity that is most beneficial for exposing "a window into the rural South for the ignorant North."

Letter from British High School Student to MLK

UNITED KINGDOM

Margaret Blenkins, a fifteen year old student from Northumberland, England, writes Dr. King to ask how she can join the Civil Rights Movement.

Message from Betty Babcock to MLK

New York (NY)

Betty Babcock writes Dr. King and discusses similarities in international conflicts before wishing him blessings around the Christmas holiday.

Telegram from Abraham Heschel to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Alabama (AL)

Abraham Heschel tells Dr. King that he has a deep identification with the goals that Dr. King is dedicated to and offers him encouragement.

Royalty Statement for a Payot Published Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York (NY)

This royalty statement for a French-language edition of "Why We Can't Wait" documents royalties earned in 1966.

Chicago Project - From the Study of MLK

Chicago, IL

Dr. King reviews the historical accomplishments of the SCLC, its future goals and visions, and provides an overview of the "Chicago Project."

Letter from Robert N. Balkind to Andrew Young

New York, NY

This document is a letter of condolence written by the chief executive of a manufacturing company and addressed to Andrew Young, mistakenly listed as head of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). The writer laments Dr. King's assassination and offers a contribution in his "name, honor, and memory."

Time

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

Letter from Miss D. McDonald to The Rev. Julian J. Keiser

Monday, June 22, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Los Angeles, CA

Miss McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, assures Reverend Keiser that Dr. King's recent trip to Los Angeles was a pleasnt experience. Miss McDonald conveys Dr. King's hope that his "appearance, in some way, proved helpful."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Walter Ducey

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Chicago, IL, St. Augustine, FL

Dora McDonald informs Walter Ducey that Dr. King is out of town at the moment and grants him permission to include Dr. King's photograph and remarks in the publication he is producing.

Letter from Manley Brudvig to MLK about an Autograph

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Wisconsin (WI)

In this letter Manley Brudvig asks Dr. King for his autograph on the enclosed Newsweek cover.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

VIETNAM, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, FRANCE, JAPAN

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Thursday, February 18, 1960
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Dr. King's business partner writes to him from the Midtown Office in New York regarding a column in which they are working on. His partner assures Dr. King that the column will be successful and discusses future plans and events to help fund raise and raise awareness about the it.

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 17, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Minnesota (MN), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, New York (NY), Nebraska (NE)

Thousands of students from across the nation collectively organized a March on Washington to end the war in Vietnam. The students were attempting to voice their disapproval of the war and asked that conscientious individuals join them.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Friday, May 5, 1967
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Maurice A. Dawkins is requesting Dr. King to attend an infomal meeting, along with other civil rights leaders, to discuss the War on Proverty in the South.

Letter from Dolores H. Autuore to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967
New York, NY

Mrs. Autuore encloses some checks that were misplaced temporarily while offering her gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to Pine Island.

Letter from Sister M. Angelice to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964
Alabama (AL), Louisville, KY, Montgomery, AL, Kentucky (KY)

Sister Angelice, Acting President of Ursiline College in Louisville, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and expresses admiration for his civil rights efforts.