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"SOUTH AFRICA"

Letter from Adam C. Powell to Wyatt Tee Walker

Reverend Adam Clayton Powell copies to MLK a letter informing Wyatt Walker that his preaching duties at Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem are being terminated because of budget constraints.

Secrets of a Happy Marriage

Dr. King expounds upon the secrets of a happy marriage. His first point is that the husband and wife must comprehend the nature of sexes. He describes the dichotomy of a man and woman's perception of contentment. The second point Dr. King makes is that the married couple must have an understanding of the nature of marriage itself. He further asserts that a successful marriage must be built on a mutual compromise. The final contention by Dr. King is each individual must instill the sacredness of marriage.

Letter from Paul H. Douglas to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Paul H. Douglass extends his gratitude to Dr. King, Roy Wilkins and their followers for the "passage of the Civil Rights Bill."

Election of MLK to the Morehouse College Board of Trustees

Friday, January 22, 1965

Charles Merrill and Benjamin E. Mays inform the Morehouse College Board of Trustees of Dr. King's consideration for a seat on the Board to replace Dr. Colwell. This consideration is pending if this election does not cause Judge Elbert P. Tuttle to resign his seat on the Board or disqualify himself as an officer of the U. S. Court of Appeal of the Fifth Circuit.

Letter to MLK from Violet Calvert

Thursday, July 1, 1965

Violet Calvert expresses to Dr. King that she has little money but she uses letters to fight for equality. She shows Dr. King a copy of one of her published letters.

Letter from M. Carl Holman Regarding Equal Education Opportunity Conference

Thursday, November 9, 1967

M. Carl Holman, the Director of the Equal Educational Opportunity in America's Cities, a conference of the United States Commission on Civil Rights, writes to the conference partic-ipants, Dr. King included. Carl Holman writes that this conference was specifically requested by President Johnson following the Commission's report on racial isolation in public schools.

"Green Power" for Negroes

This SCLC news release documents the success of "a pioneer agreement between the Chicago Freedom Movement and a large grocery chain." As a product of Operation Breadbasket, this development cycled both jobs and capital to keep them organic to the Negro community.

Letter from Kathleen Reid to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967

Kathleen Reed, the editor of Alert Catholic, writes to Dr. King enclosing the most recent copy of the publication. The Newsletter of the National Council of Catholic Men features a quote by Dr. King to President Johnson which stated "the conditions which you so bravely set out to remedy when you entered office" have not changed.

Schleiermacher (Religion as Contemplation)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Field Foundation Station on the Death of MLK

Friday, April 5, 1968

A portion of the statement on the death of Dr. King from the Field Foundations states, "As at other times of national shame and self-despair, what is at issue now is how ell we as a nation shall respond morally and politically." The heart of this statement reminds readers that the "ugly scars of racism and poverty will not be eliminated in this country until the people will it to be done."

Outline Written in MLK's Handwriting Entitled: Be Ye Perfect

The document, shown here, is a combination of a handwritten outline and notes for the preparation of a sermon. Under the title, "Be Ye Perfect", Dr. King described Jesus, in relation to rational and moral perfection.

Letter from Dr. King to W. Daniels

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. responds to W. Daniels letter regarding a speaking invitation, March 12, 1968. Dr. King regrettably informs him that his intensive schedule restricts his ability to accept speaking engagements, for the next eight or nine months.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Stoug

Dr. King writes Mrs. Stoug thanking her for sending a copy of the play, "Listen America." He also offers advice on how to market her play and expresses his appreciation for her support for the Civil Rights Movement.

A Program of Education in the Philosophy of Non-Violence

The American Foundation on Non-Violence and the SCLC outline a proposal to the Stern Family Fund to educate America on the philosophy of non-violence. The proposed program includes a semi-annual leadership seminar, community leaders conferences, and youth and student workshops.

Letter from Arthur Abba Goldberg to Dr. King about Conducting Seminars for SCLC

Friday, January 12, 1968

Arthur Abba Goldberg, Deputy Attorney General for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs and the Housing Finance Agency is sending a copy of his resume to Dr. King, and expresses his interest in conducting seminars in the field of housing or housing finance.

Report of A Participant

This report illustrates the authors concern and outlook on the Vietnam war.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Makola

Dr. King thanks Mr. Makola for reminding him of the "injustices and inequalities" Negroes face both in the United States and South Africa. Dr. King asserts that the issues Negroes face are symptoms of a deeper issue involving foreign policy and that his current focus is on the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Dr. William H. Allen regarding kind letter

Tuesday, October 15, 1968

Dr. King sent this thank you letter to Dr. William Allen for the prayers and well wishes expressed to Dr. King, as he recovered from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem in 1958. He also conveyed to Dr. Allen that he had been making great progress in his health and anticipated rejoining those working hard in the fight for equality.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to Dora McDonald

Monday, January 9, 1967

Carey McWilliams writes Dora McDonald acknowledging confirmation of Dr. King's commitment to speak for "The Nation's" conference in Los Angeles.

Letter from William Reynolds to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Mr. Reynolds writes Dr. King requesting to use quotations from his April 5th speech to encourage a higher attendance at future vigils in the Bay Area.

The Plain Dealer: Dr. King Here Today to Gauge Tensions

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

This article, printed in "The Plain Dealer," provides a brief history of Dr. King and details the plans he had for Cleveland, OH.

Death of Dr. King

This photo was taken after Dr. King's assassination and contains slogans in support for the fallen leader.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. C.A. Echols

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dora McDonald responds to Rev. C.A. Echols on behalf of Dr. King. She encloses a statement from Dr. King which was pubished in the "Massachusetts Review" for Echol's graduate studies.

United States Department of State Reprint of Vice President Nixon Speech

Thursday, December 6, 1956

This document contains the text of an address made by Vice President Nixon before the Automobile Manufacturers Association in New York.

Letter from Mrs. Presley Layer to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

As a member of the Urban League and other civic organizations, Mrs. Layer expresses her concerns about the conduct of marches verses a more militant tactic. Mrs. Layer asserts that we live in a violent nation and is concerned that violent pacifist will become uncontrollable. She concludes with informing Dr. King she is an admirer and long supporter of the SCLC.

The Student Movement and You

This handbill calls for a boycott on Rich's and A & P in response to their discriminatory practices in employment and services to the Negro population of Atlanta, Georgia.

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to David Hunter

Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Mr. Wachtel expresses gratitude for a grant awarded by the Stern Family Fund to the American Foundation on Nonviolence and the SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Goldwin

Wednesday, March 20, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Robert A. Goldwin the four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation" have been received and placed on Dr. King's desk for him to read upon his return from out of town.

Letter from Nels F. S. Ferre to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Dr. Ferre commends Dr. King on writing "Where Do We Go From Here?" He also expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his position of leadership and for including him in the author's list.