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"SOUTH AFRICA"

Justice Harlan Concurring

This newspaper article discusses John Marshall Harlan's dissent with the case of "Plessy vs. Ferguson," and how Harlan was not acknowledged when the case was overturned.

Telegram from United States House of Representatives to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

The United States House of Representatives congratulates Dr. King and other leaders on their march to Montgomery, Alabama. They believe that the march will be recognized as the "beginning of genuine democracy" in American history.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.

Error

This set of note cards written by Dr. King explores the causation of error. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "The Concept of Nature" noting several reasons as to the rise of error.

Barth

Dr. King writes on Barth's stance on the authoritative values of the Bible "in the tradition of Calvin."

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

South African Victims of Apartheid

Friday, December 10, 1965

The American Committee on Africa hosts a human rights rally and benefit on behalf of the victims of South African Apartheid. This program provides a brief history and overall purpose of the committee and outlines the projected schedule of events.

Letter from J. Stanley Purnell to Rev. MLK, Sr.

Monday, February 26, 1968

The Chairman of the United Health Foundations, J. Stanley Purnell, sends out an gratitude of thanks to Daddy King.

MLK's Statement on Church Bombing in Leesburg, GA

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

MLK expresses his clear disgust with the actions of the civil rights resisters, denouncing their bombing of a local church.

Letter from J. Herbert May to Ralph Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Herbert May discusses several points in which he disagrees with Ralph Abernathy on how to best reach a fully integrated and equitable society.

Letter from MLK to Charles E. Merrill, Jr.

Thursday, September 28, 1967

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Charles Merrill for developing his ideas, being concerned about his health, and contributing funds that allow both work and rest.

Letter from Marshall Bean to MLK

Saturday, July 3, 1965

Marshall Bean, a public school teacher suffering from cancer, writes Dr. King requesting an autographed picture and a "few words of joy."

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Evans

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Evans for their monetary contribution of $200. Dr. King references the work of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and explains how the Evans' contribution supports the efforts of the organization.

Letter of Condolence from Jerry K. Bolton

Thursday, April 4, 1968

Mr. Bolton expresses his heartfelt sympathy for the "unjust loss" of Dr. King.

Letter from George Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, September 30, 1964

George Lucas writes Dr. King to follow-up on a telephone conversation confirming Dr. King's appearance in Dayton, Ohio. Lucas informs Dr. King that the event will take place at the Field House of the University of Dayton.

Kansas City Star Drawing

This editorial cartoon from the Kansas City Star depicts Dr. King at a bar with two bottles labeled "Anti-Vietnam" and "100 Proof." A young girl representing the Civil Rights Movement pulls on his coat and asks him to come home.

Last Page of Riverside Speech

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This document is the last page of Dr. King's Riverside Speech, the only page of this version of the speech in the collection. The speech ends with a quotation from James Russell Lowell's "Once to Every Nation."

Letter from Irving Davis to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Irvin Davis of Celebrities Art Exhibits invites Dr. King to tour with the organization depending on his artistic abilities.

United Nations Seminar Brochure

This pamphlet offers information on the registration, time, place, and cost of the United Nations Seminar being held in Washington D.C from October 17-21, 1966. Enclosed is a registration form for the Seminar.

Immortality

Dr. King references the book of Psalms regarding the subject of immortality.

This is SCLC

This SCLC brochure highlights the organization's mission, organizational structure, and initiatives, such as voter registration drives, Citizenship Schools, and the Leadership Training Program.

Conference on Strengthening the New Politics

Monday, December 20, 1965

Paul Albert forwards this letter to all individuals invited to and interested in the Shoreham Conference, in which Liberals address the shortcomings of American politics.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Josephine Davis

Monday, April 19, 1965

Dorothy Gaines thanks Josephine Davis and her friends for their generous donation to the SCLC. Gaines explains the current efforts of the SCLC as well as the monthly budget of the organization. She expresses the importance of financial contributions and encloses receipts from the donation.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."

Constitution and By-Laws of the SCLC, Inc.

The SCLC exhibits its rules and regulations for the stability of the organization in this Constitution and by-laws. SCLC's constitution addresses several organizational related factors including board responsibilities, meetings, membership and chapter development.

Letter from US Attorney General Robert Kennedy Forwarded to MLK

Friday, May 8, 1964

John L. Murphy writes Dr. King to forward him a letter for the Reverend from US Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that his office received in error. In the forwarded letter, Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his willingness to contribute to a series of oral interviews for the John F. Kennedy library.

Remarks of MLK: En Granslos Kval Pa Operan

Thursday, March 31, 1966

In this address, Dr. King expresses his Dream for America and his sincere appreciation for Sweden's support for "the cause of racial justice in America."

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Thursday, June 18, 1959

Vice President Richard M. Nixon expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's participation at the recent Religious Leaders Conference on Equal Job Opportunity. Nixon emphasizes the need for ongoing collaboration between local and national leaders to advance critical policy initiatives.

Attitude, Knowledge and Apperception of the Civil Rights in the Puerto Rican Public

E. Seda Bonilla, Ph. D. writes about the acts of discrimination that occur in Puerto Rico. Backed by data, it is said that colored groups are being kept from achieving higher levels of education. In addition, Bonilla observes a correlation between individual occupational rate and individual degree of intolerance.