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"SOUTH AFRICA"

Letter from Emily Ann Fortson to MLK

Wednesday, June 29, 1966

Emily Fortson, of Concreta Tours, informs Dr. King of the developing proposal related to his upcoming Holy Land Pilgrimage.

Letter from Walter Gibson to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mr. Gibson writes to Dr. King concerning his political position on the Vietnam War. He believes that the war is a just war because the end is to help the South Vietnamese halt the spread of communism.

Fear

Dr. King quotes John Watson's "Behaviorism" on the two things that incite fear.

Letter from Lanette J. Campbell

Saturday, March 16, 1968

Lanette J. Campbell requests information regarding candidates in the Choice '68 presidential primary.

A Statement to the South and Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement. The document states that a world-wide campaign for social and political freedom shows an international plight for human dignity. As America is one of the two most powerful nations in the world, "the unresolved problem of civil rights becomes the most crucial issue." There is contradiction between the freedom America proclaims and the actual practice of civil liberties and democracy. Dr.

Letter to Participants in Team Ministry to Southern Cities from Jack Sisson and Oscar McCloud

Friday, May 12, 1967

Subsequent to the collective participation in the Team Ministry to Southern Cities, the members formed a consensus that a mandatory urgent meeting was necessary. The meeting will entail the regrouping of Team Ministry, community conflict, Project Equality, and the follow-up plans in three southern locations.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

Letter from Lady Bird Johnson to Sally Stengel

Sunday, October 4, 1964

Lady Bird Johnson thanks Mrs. Stengel for the sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt.

Memorandum from Pacem In Terris II to All Participants

This memorandum from the Pacem In Terris II Secretariat issues detailed arrival and departure instructions to all participants of the Pacem In Terris Convocation. General conference information is also included. Translated as "Peace on Earth," the event was held in Geneva, Switzerland and accommodated participants from around the world. Dr. King attended the conference and delivered an address.

The Third Level of Ontological Concepts

Dr. King writes notes regarding the third level of ontological concepts, which "expresses the characteristics of being which are conditions of existence."

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

Thursday, December 15, 1966

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.

Letter from Harper & Brothers to MLK

Monday, June 19, 1961

This letter from Harper & Brothers expresses concerns for the completion of a forthcoming book.

Memorandum from SCLC Personnel Committee to the Steering Committee

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

SCLC's Personnel Committee conducts a meeting to review the release of William Whitsett from Department of Information. The meeting resulted in the committee's unanimous decision to send a list of recommendations for the Steering Committee to review.

Address at a Conference of Religious Leaders Under the Sponsorship of the President's Committee on Government Contracts

Monday, May 11, 1959

Dr. King addresses a delegation of religious leaders at a conference hosted by the President's Committee on Government Contracts. In this pivotal speech, Dr. King outlines the responsibilites of clergymen and government officials in combating poverty and economic discrimination. He stresses the need for lay leaders and representatives of government to bodly speak out against the vestiges of discrimination that continuously hinder the economic and social progress of Negroes in America.

Check Distribution for the Crusade for Citizenship Program

Friday, December 31, 1965

Mildred Smith is given a check on behalf of the Crusade for Citizenship program.

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

Letter from Walter W. Windisch to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

Walter W. Windisch writes to Dr. King to express his gratitude for the Peace March led by Dr. King in New York City. He also expresses his desire to be a part of any upcoming demonstrations.

Letter from Jacques Muhlethaler to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

The EIP, an association which seeks to establish the greatest number of schools in the world, asks Dr. King to become a member of their Board of Patrons.

Letter from R. Belui to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

R. Belui thanks Dr. King for his courage in the fight for social justice. He also expresses his wishes for Dr. King's to be a presidential candidate.

American Committee On Africa Invitation to Protest Apartheid

Tuesday, March 7, 1967

This form letter informs and invites the recipients to attend functions sponsored by the American Committee on Africa in protest against Chase Manhattan Bank's financial relationship with the apartheid regime in South Africa.

Letter from Mrs. Edna E. Williams to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

Mrs. Edna E. Williams invites Dr. King to attend The Friendship Baptist Church's annual Harry W. Knight Award and Mortgage Retirement Fund Banquet.

Document and Material on the Child Development Group of Mississippi

Wednesday, September 28, 1966

This series of documents and materials on the Child Development Group of Mississippi contains multiple sections. Section One contains six letters, one telegram and one newspaper article praising the efforts of the CDGM and its staff.

Montanism

Dr. King records information about the second century Christian movement known as Montanism.

Letter from William L. Hudson to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

William Hudson of the Commonwealth Club of California extends his gratitude to Dr. King for an address given to the Club.

Letter from Joseph Clark to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Joseph S. Clark, Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Employment, Manpower and Poverty, writes Dr. King to request his testimony. Dr. King's speech would serve as a preface to the hearing on public service and private enterprise employment/training programs.

True Democracy

Reverend O. J. P. Wetklo explains his ideas of true democracy, which he gives a Christian foundation and compares to the natural world. He calls true democracy "a perfect brotherhood of man," and he argues that each individual member of society must take responsibility for the whole.

Schrag

Dr. King cites Oswald O. Schrag’s article “The Main Types of Existentialism” that appeared in Religion in Life, winter 1953-54.

MLK Organizes Campaign for Voters

Dr. King announces a "nationwide bipartisan drive to get out the vote on election day." King's campaign charges religious leaders across the USA to help mobilize people to vote for the upcoming presidential election.

Telegram from Alexander Edelmann to MLK

Alexander Edelmann, a professor from the University of Nebraska, criticizes Dr. King for not taking a stance against black rioters in Atlanta. Edelmann mentions the he once was a supporter of Dr. King, but now considers him "irresponsible."

Letter from Alice Mary Hilton and Kathryn Anne Hilton Hayward to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Kathryn, a young American girl, writes a letter to Dr. King expressing her sympathy for a girl in the Vietnam War. Kathryn sends twelve cents to help the girl in the war smile. Kathryn's mother also expresses her concern about the war.