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"SOUTH KOREA"

Statement by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964

This document contains Dr. King's remarks on injustices in the state of Mississippi. He suggests a complete boycott if the federal or state government is unable to perform the proper means of justice.

Judith Ann Jones Writes Mr. Ralph Helstein Inquiring About Consideration for a Scholarship.

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

College Student Judith Ann Jones writes Ralph Helstein, President of United Packinghouse, Food and Allied Workers, about the Russell H. Bull Scholarship. She explains how she plans to use the scholarship to further encourage others to be more racially tolerant.

Letter to MLK from the Peace Research Institute

Saturday, November 28, 1964

The Peace Research Institute of Oslo congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize and further expresses their interest of having Dr. King speak at a seminar on nonviolence. The institute is starting a research project on nonviolence with a focus on observing inter-group conflicts.

Envelope addressed to Coretta Scott King from the House of Representatives

This envelope is addressed to Coretta Scott King and originates from Congress. Notable are the stamps denoting the date of the post mark and date of receipt, six and eleven days, respectively, after the day of Dr. King's assassination.

The Real Poverty

Sunday, December 4, 1966

SCLC Director of Public Relations Junius Griffin announces the opening of the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the Wilcox County, Alabama branch of the SCLC. Throughout the speech, he asserts that true poverty is a "man without compassion," and that any person who does not know how to help others is worse off than "our ancestors who were slaves."

Operation Breadbasket

Saturday, December 10, 1966

Rev. Jesse Jackson meets with National Tea Company and Del Farm Foods representatives to sign an agreement that will create jobs for blacks.

Letter from Robert G. Lippmann to MLK

Saturday, November 16, 1963

Robert G. Lippmann requests a copy of the sermon Dr. King delivered at the Sixth Avenue Baptist Church for the funeral services of Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Diane Wesley.

"God's Judgment on Western Civilization"

The document contains notes for a sermon given by Dr. King entitled, "God's Judgement on Western Civilization."

WBTV Editorial: "King's Bedfellows"

Monday, February 19, 1968

The content of this document suggested that Dr. King break ties with leaders Stokley Carmichael and H. Rap Brown, due to their stance on violence as a weapon. At the bottom of this document, is an invitation for Dr. King, H. Rap Brown and Stokley Carmichael to respond.

Draft Letter from MLK Regarding Grand Freedom March

Dr. King addresses his "Brother-In-Christ" requesting assistance for an up and coming March for Freedom held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He makes three requests including financial and social support.

What's Your Brotherhood Quotient?

National Comics Publications, Inc. publishes this questionnaire as a public service to gauge the attitudes of readers while also enlightening readers about their own xenophobic perceptions. The writer asserts that it is okay to dislike vegetables or insects, but to dislike people is to "hurt them and cheat yourself."

Freedom!: A Spiritual Inspiration

Composer Kenneth A. Roane wrote the song "Freedom," which he dedicated to the fight for civil rights.

Letter from Francis Drake to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

Francis Drake sends Dr. King a donation to the SCLC collected on behalf of the Drake Family as a Thanksgiving gift. Drake and his wife are ministers with the United Church of Christ in Massachusetts and support Dr. King's fight for freedom and justice.

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Telegram from Mrs. Willie Bass to MLK

Thursday, September 23, 1954

Mrs. Willie M. Bass sent this telegram expressing her hope for Dr. King's speedy recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Letter from US Soldiers Lester Hill, James Gardner and Homer Collier to MLK

Friday, October 15, 1965

Three Negro soldiers communicate with Dr. King regarding the racial practices of white GIs against fellow Negro GIs. The soldiers feel pressure to not only fight against the enemy but to watch over their shoulders to shield themselves from intimidation against the white GIs. Lester Hill writes on behalf of soldiers requesting Dr. King's help.

Letter from Sam Gasbarre to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967

Sam Gasbarre, identifying himself as a white American, writes Dr. King to support his opinion that the Vietnam War is evil and should end.

Letter from Mrs. William Wenger to MLK

Mrs. Wenger pleads with Dr. King to never give up the fight for civil rights.

Fifth Grade Students Write to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Fifth Graders at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, write to Dr. King in request of literature about his style of worship.

Letter from Beverly A. Asbury and David W. Stoh to the SCLC

Thursday, February 22, 1968

In this letter, dated February 22, 1968, the chaplains at Benton Chapel of Vanderbilt University enclose a check of support to the S.C.L.C.

Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King makes an address at the "Pilgrimage for Democracy" in Atlanta during the winter of 1963. He opens with the Supreme Courts ruling to cease segregation in schools and how Atlanta served as the "epitome of social progress." He continues to elaborate on how the city needs to continue its desegregation efforts to achieve justice. Dr. King numerically highlights the inadequacies of the integrated schools in Atlanta and expresses the reality of the continuing segregation in the city's public accommodations.

Letter from Phillip L. Girard to MLK

Wednesday, February 15, 1967

In this letter, Phillip L. Girard informs Dr. King of his intent to donate Girard College to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, in the event of the Girard will being violated.

Invitation from Saint Vincent College to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1963

Ralph J. Hils Jr., Director of Assemblies, invites Dr. King to address the student body at St. Vincent's College. He shares a local encounter with discrimination against their American and African Negro students. Mr. Hils outlines the history of the college and provides the names of other prominent visitors of the campus.

Letter from MLK to Premier Lyndon Pindling

Friday, January 19, 1968

Dr. King encourages Premier Pindling of the Bahamas to accept an invitation to address the Atlanta Press Club. Dr. King assures Premier Pindling that the invitation is a great opportunity to speak with leading journalists from all over the United States.

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. and Mrs. Peretz

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Andrew Young thanks Dr. and Mrs. Peretz for their hospitality during a recent concert. He also explains that the concert, which had been designed as a fundraiser for the SCLC, did not meet financial projections.

3000 Jackson Negros Flay Headstart Cutoff

This article discusses the protest of African Americans to the ending of the Headstart nursey program, and the reallocation of those funds to other state programs.

Letter from E. Paul Weaver to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

E. Paul Weaver writes to Dr. King enclosing a small contribution for the work of the SCLC. Weaver also requests that the Dr. King visit Camp Mack as a guest speaker. The Executive Secretary of Church of the Brethren, one of three historic peace churches in the U. S., informs Dr. King of the Brethren's strong stand against slavery long before the Civil War.

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Coleman to MLK

Wednesday, June 23, 1965

Dr. King writes Mrs. G. Coleman to acknowledge the receipt of her letter inviting him to speak at a Freedom Rally in Beckley, West Virginia. Dr. King expresses his deep regret in his inability to attend.

Class Notes

Dr. King records notes from the biblical Book of Judges regarding topics such as knowledge, sin, the doctrine of God and ethics.

Individualization and Participation

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."