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"SOUTH KOREA"

Letter from Emerson College to MLK Regarding Speaking Invitation

Monday, November 20, 1967

Emerson College extends Dr. King an invitation to speak at their communication lecture series. The lecture coordinator, Vic Silvestri, assures Dr. King that he will be awarded both an honorarium and travel expenses if he accepts.

Letter from Susan Altman to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Susan Altman requests an autographed copy of Time magazine, in which Dr. King was featured.

Letter from D. F. Lewis to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

D. F. Lewis, a member of the County Line Missionary Baptist Association, commends Dr. King for "fighting on the Lord's side." The organization contributes to the SCLC to continue the fight against racial injustice in the United States.

Postcard to MLK on Dallas Police

Monday, March 18, 1968

This newspaper clipping makes reference to an article about the Dallas Police Department's effort to recruit Negro police officers.

Note from Will Dale to MLK

Will Dale writes Dr. King commending him for encouraging Black athletes to boycott the Olympic games.

Letter from Dora McDonald to T. M. Benson

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Dr. King's secretary responds to a request from Peak Publications to use a portion of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract. Ms. Dora explains to the company's representative that the letter will be published in an upcoming book, hence Dr. King has made a commitment to the publisher to refuse permission for reprints.

Give Decency A Chance in the South...

The Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) is working toward eliminating "all forms of racial segregation in the Southern and border States." This brochure highlights SCEF's accomplishments, supporters, programs and future.

Anonymous Criticism of MLK

An anonymous person wrote this letter to Dr. King, telling him that he is "directly responsible" for the murder of a 16 year old boy in Memphis, Tennessee.

Letter from O. O. Rabb to MLK

Monday, March 27, 1967

This note and newspaper clipping from O.O. Robb was addressed to "The Right Reverend Martin Luther King, Pastor & Civil Rights Agitator." Robb assures Dr. King that he would, in fact, find supporters, "for there are many soft-headed wild-eyed people who have a soft heart and no brains who will follow." Robb contines that President Johnson's Great Society and War on Poverty must go on and ends that Dr. King and his supporters will get their reward - a prison cell.

Letter from MLK to Kathy Sasso

Monday, April 27, 1964

Dr. King shares his pleasure in being named "Person of the Week" by Miss Sasso's class. He encloses a copy of one of his speeches.

Check from New York Times Company to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

The New York Times company presents Dr. King with a $400 check for his article on civil rights.

Letter from G. Campbell-Westlind to MLK

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

G. Campbell-Westlind, Acting Consul General of the Royal Consulate General of Sweden, informs Dr. King that Simon & Schuster has asked the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm for permission to print his Nobel Award Acceptance Speech. The letter requests Dr. King's comments on the proposal.

Telegram from Robert L. Green, Floyd McKissack and Roy Wilkins to MLK

Mr. Wilkins, Mr. Kissack and Mr. Green express their viewpoint regarding restrictive racial policies towards the Negro, more specifically towards Negro women by members of the Women's City Club of Detroit. The author encourages a dismembership from the club based on their findings.

Metropolitan Youth Commission of St. Louis

The following document recounts a three-year survey conducted by the Metropolitan Youth Commission in regards to the "Distribution of juvenile apprehensions by age, sex, and from the year 1960 to July 25, 1963."

Telegram from Morris Abram to MLK

Morris B. Abram expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and shares his outrage towards the police brutality exhibited during a protest in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Larry Oaks to SCLC

Monday, April 20, 1964

A student from the University of Alabama requests information from the SCLC for a course on race relations.

United Nations Association-Hawaii Chapter

Monday, April 8, 1968

The card, shown here, is an expression of condolence and gratitude from the Hawaii chapter of the United Nations Association, in the form of a "lei of love".

Southern Christian Leadership Resolutions

Friday, June 30, 1967

Chauncey Eskridge sends Andrew Young resolutions related to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Mr. Eskridge explains that an examination into the foundation's tax exempt status by the IRS prompted his letter.

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King talks about Montgomery, Alabama and the accomplishments that they have made toward civil rights.

Telegram from Reverend Daniel Speed to Reverend Andrew Young

Monday, August 2, 1965

A telegram from Rev. Speed informing Rev. Young of arrival information for the 1965 Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Marie L. Jones Regarding Reverend Ashton Jones

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

Mary L. Jones sent out this letter reporting on the plight of her husband, Reverend Ashton Jones, who was arrested in July of 1963 for attempting to lead an interracial student group into a service at the segregated First Baptist Church of Atlanta. Reverend Jones was sentenced to a year in the Georgia state prison and six months of hard labor for the crime of "disturbing a worship service." Mrs. Jones encourages readers of her letter to heed the advice of British social critic Bertrand Russell, by writing an "avalanche of letters" to those responsible.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

This draft of an article for the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC newsletter discusses recent riots in New York City and Rochester, New York. The riots are a disappointment not only because they deviate from the path of nonviolence, but also because the rioters looted many Jewish-owned businesses. The article closes by listing examples of Jews helping in the fight for racial equality in the United States.

Annual Address by MLK for the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 3, 1959

This document outlines Dr. King's address for the Fourth Anniversary of the Montgomery Improvement Association, held at Bethel Baptist Church in Montgomery. In the address, Dr. King speaks about the history, achievements and current task of the Association.

Letter from Gregory Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Eleven-year-old Gregory Williams expresses his admiration and support for Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

A Memorandum Regarding the Cooperative Housing and Rehabilitation Program

In this memorandum from James P. Twomey, executive director of the Community Renewal Foundation Inc., writes to Mr. Donald Jordan of the Federal Housing Administration in regards to the building of cooperative housing and rehabilitation centers. The memorandum address certain issues such as the mortgage for the homes as well as the architects and attorneys

Letter of White Opposition to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

A gentleman by the name of David writes to Dr. King expressing his belief that segregation is the "best way to avoid dating, dancing, sex and marriage" between Negroes and whites.

Letter from MLK to Joel Crittenden

Dr. King responds to Joel Crittenden's concern about white hatred toward Negroes by making two points: 1) some whites have given their lives in the freedom struggle, and 2) hatred and violence must be met with love and nonviolence.

Letter from MLK to Wallace F. Bennett

Tuesday, June 23, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Wallace F. Bennett, a United States Senator from Utah, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Telegram from Thomas Gedeon to MLK

Sunday, June 4, 1967

Reverend Gedeon, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Cleveland, Ohio, writes to Dr. King concerning a proposed retreat program geared towards uniting religious and Negro leaders. Due to the lack of responses on Dr. King behalf, Gedeon terminates any further plans for the aimed program until further notice.