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"SOUTH KOREA"

United States Department of State Reprint of Vice President Nixon Speech

Thursday, December 6, 1956
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

This document contains the text of an address made by Vice President Nixon before the Automobile Manufacturers Association in New York.

Harry Belafonte - American Committee on Africa

New York (NY), SOUTH AFRICA, INDIA, PAKISTAN, NETHERLANDS, SWEDEN, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Harry Belafonte sends a request for support in South Africa bringing awareness to apartheid and the injustices it entails. Belafonte implores the reader to send immediate help to the country in financial contributions, as an effort to fight racism and government corruption.

Negotiation Now!

VIETNAM, New York, NY

Negotiation Now is a national citizens' campaign that supports new initiatives to end the Vietnam War. The campaign aligns with the Secretary General of the United Nations, U Thant, who discusses the necessary "cessation" of bombing in North Vietnam to bring about a peaceful political compromise. This flier shares the campaign's views and offers a section for donation information.

Letter from President Johnson to Robert W. Gilmore

Wednesday, August 9, 1967
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

President Johnson writes Robert Gilmore regarding the "Democratic Action in South Vietnam" statement of the Center for War/Peace Studies. Johnson assures him that the U.S. government shares his concern for the development of democracy in Vietnam.

Evil

Dr. King writes about evil, according to Jeremiah 44: 23.

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Philip Hiat

Friday, February 8, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King responds to Rabbi Hiat's suggestion to provide an "opportunity for dialogue between Jewish and Negro religious leadership." In addition to confirming his participation in the dialogue, Dr. King commits to sending an additional letter with the names of "men who have much to contribute" along with some potential subject headings for the agenda.

Letter from Marjorie Heins to MLK and Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 14, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., GERMANY

Marjorie Heins informs the SCLC that the Campaign for Disarmament, a peace group in Germany, requests for Dr. King to give 5-10 lectures for about 2,000 - 3,000 people.

Sin I and Sin II

Dr. King cites scripture in examining concepts of sin.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to the President of the SCLC, addresses Attorney General Eugene Cook regarding a conversation that was agreed to be private. Despite this agreement, the conversation was publicized to United Press International. Mr. Walker expresses his frustration and announces his next steps to the Attorney General.

Antisemitism

RUSSIAN FEDERATION, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, ISRAEL

An anonymous group issues a public statement addressing the rising issue of antisemitism throughout the world. According to the document, Soviet Jewry are facing "cultural extinction." As a result, Soviet relations have worsened in Israel. The group indicates that the policies of the U.S.S.R. have caused this wave of antisemitic discrimination and a nation-wide effort will have to help eradicate the movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elizabeth Babcock

Tuesday, February 2, 1965
New York (NY), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Babcock that she received the contribution for the SCLC on behalf of Dr. King. Miss McDonald tells Mrs. Babcock that Dr. King is imprisoned in Selma, Alabama and that he will respond upon his release.

Handwritten Notes on Sin

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sin. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

MLK Notes for Speech to the Chicago Headline Club

Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

This is a draft of a speech Dr. King delivered to the Chicago Headline Club. The speech encompasses information regarding the difficulty the media may have covering the SCLC and the Civil Rights Movement.

Value

Dr. King references Ralph Perry's "Present Philosophical Tendencies" and "The Present Conflict of Ideals" in relation to the subject of value.

Letter from Dr. King to Mr. David George Ball

Thursday, October 23, 1958
Connecticut (CT)

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. George Ball, of the Yale University Christian Association, for the kind outpouring of support during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He acknowledges his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process is complete.

Letter from 'Hardworking People' to MLK

A white American recommends a different approach to Civil Rights demonstrations. He believes that if celebrities are placed at the fore front of the marches that the black community would then be motivated to work.

Letter to MLK from Alan Westin

Friday, April 8, 1966
New York, NY

Alan F. Westin invites Dr. King to serve on the Board of Governors of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties of Columbia Univeristy and Teachers College. Westin describes the mission of the Center and asks Dr. King to join in their efforts of developing civil rights teaching techniques to be used in all levels of public education.

Clergymen Set Negro Market Wholesaler

Monday, February 7, 1966
New York (NY), ITALY, ISRAEL

This article explains how "three clergymen have organized a wholesale tour service which will cater to the Negro travel market." The service was called "Concreta Tour Service" and it took tourists abroad, focusing on many cities with religious significance.

The Negotiating Committee and Housing

Thursday, May 12, 1966

This statement by the Negotiation Committee lists several improvements made to an African American housing community. The Committee explains that the changes are only on a trial basis and therefore, the community will still picket until permanent changes are made.

Southern Presbyterian Church Donation to SCLC

Friday, October 27, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

John Randolph Taylor informs Dr. King of a donation from "A Fellowship of Concern" and members of the Presbyterian Church U.S. to the SCLC.

Telegram from Edythe Siceluff to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ)

Edythe Siceluff recalls her conversation with Dr. King in 1957 where they predicted he would become a prosperous world leader.

Letter from Ervin R. Meyer to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

Ervin R. Meyer informs Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy that he is against the Poor People's March on Washington. Mr. Meyers perceives these demonstrations as attracting "law breakers" that do not reflect Christian actions. The author identifies additional organizations and expresses their opposition to the SCLC's Christian mission.

Letter from Tenant to MLK

A tenant from a "slum" building writes to Dr. King requesting help for the building in which she lives. Throughout the letter she lists several problems with the building and hopes that Dr. King can offer assistance.

Annual Report by MLK

Friday, October 2, 1964
Virginia (VA), Richmond, VA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, New York (NY), New York, NY, Maryland (MD), California (CA), San Francisco, CA, EGYPT, Montgomery, AL, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Texas (TX), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA, North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King illustrates in his annual report the innovative changes that have occurred within the country, as well as the world. He also expresses the Republican stand point on civil rights and the constant concern of racism.

To Earn a Living: The Right of Every American

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA), Kansas (KS), Oregon (OR)

Frederick B. Abramson, the assistant to Clifford Alexander, Jr. sends this copy of President Johnson's "To Earn a Living: the Right of Every American." Alexander, the chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, in cooperation with the White House, had this message circulated to the Congress of the United States. President Johnson's message urges Congress to assist with creating jobs and providing access to job training to all Americans regardless of race or socioeconomic status.

Letter from Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1962
Montgomery, AL

Reverend L. H. Hendricks Jr. asks Dr. King and the Ebenezer Baptist Church for financial assistance to build his church.

SCLC Voter Registration Program

Sunday, February 1, 1959
Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL

The SCLC issues a plan of action to inspire communities in the South to sponsor a year-round voter registration program. The document also includes facts regarding the organization's history and purpose, as well as detailed instructions for conducting an effective voter-registration campaign.

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Sunday, April 25, 1965
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Pittsburgh, PA

This statement by Father Dom T. Orsini expounds on the details of the March 21-26, 1965 Selma-Montgomery March. Orsini expresses that he is proud of the youth and their enthusiasm in participating in the march and suggests that insisting improper relations took place would be ridiculous.