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"SOUTH KOREA"

OEO Extends Contract with National Council of Negro Women

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This press release from the Office of Economic Opportunity highlights a technical assistance program designed to stimulate home ownership among poor Negro women in the deep South.

Letter from Morton S. Grossman to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

In this correspondence, Morton S. Grossman, expressed his joy, over Dr. King's New Year's card, and enclosed a check, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In addition, Mr. Grossman requested a note, signed by Dr. King, to add to his autograph collection.

By-Laws of the SCLC

This document outlines the by-laws of the SCLC, which includes the organization's purpose, duties and responsibilities of members, and procedures governing officers and committees. The purpose of the SCLC is to "organize and maintain Christian guidance" to aid in improving cultural conditions.

Telegram from Harry Belafonte to Coretta Scott King

In this telegram, Mr. Belafonte sympathizes with Mrs. King as she is preparing for Dr. King's sentence of four months in prison.

Schleiermacher, Friedrich

Dr. King records a note on Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion."

Letter from James Hershey to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

Joe T. Denman writes Dr. King on behalf of the Citizens For Progress Organization hoping to sponsor a speaking date in Yakima, Washington. Denman requests that the Reverend forward the date that he will arrive.

Letter to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

In this letter, the author suggests that the marchers of the Poor Peoples March should make a surprise visit to the estates of Senator Robert and Edward Kennedy during the historic event.

Letter from Edna R. McKinnon to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1967

Edna McKinnon praises Dr. King for his wonderful work with the SCLC and its effect on the "entire world." She agrees with Dr. King's nonviolent philosophy and approach to American military intervention in Vietnam. Ms. McKinnon is the sister of Jeanette Rankin, the first woman of Congress, and the only member to vote against U.S. entry into both world wars.

Catholicism

Dr. King references American theologian Niebuhr's ideas regarding Catholicism and quotes, "It pretended that the church could mediate the divine, mercy and judgement without itself standing under that judgement or requiring that mercy." This quotes derives from Niebuhr's book "The Pope's Domesticated God."

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, February 10, 1964

Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship, contacts Dr. King again about speaking at the organization's annual meeting. She informs Dr. King that she needs a response soon in order to put the information in the newspaper.

MLK's Statement at Prayer Rally in Albany, Georgia

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

After the bombing of a local church, Dr. King delivered this statement attempting to both criticize the actions of the perpetrators and provide a sense of calm to Albany demonstrators.

Address at a Conference of Religious Leaders Under the Sponsorship of the President's Committee on Government Contracts

Monday, May 11, 1959

Dr. King addresses a delegation of religious leaders at a conference hosted by the President's Committee on Government Contracts. In this pivotal speech, Dr. King outlines the responsibilites of clergymen and government officials in combating poverty and economic discrimination. He stresses the need for lay leaders and representatives of government to bodly speak out against the vestiges of discrimination that continuously hinder the economic and social progress of Negroes in America.

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

SCLC News Bulletin for November 1967

This November 1967 news bulletin published by the SCLC contains updates regarding progress of the Civil Rights Movement, excerpts from the President's Annual Report and financial facts for the organization's supporters.

The Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King addresses his concerns about the rise of anti-Semitism in Germany.

Letter from Nicholas Katzenbach to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966

U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach writes to Dr. King acknowledging his suggestion of using the Greenville Air Force Base to help alleviate the economic problems of Negro families in the Mississippi Delta. Katzenbach states that most of the land is no longer leased by the U.S. government but that Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1965 would apply to any educational programs.

Support Letter to MLK

Wednesday, January 10, 1962

Kiser writes Dr. King to enclose a financial contribution and expresses the need for better integration.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Solomon Mendelson

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

In this response letter to Cantor Mendelson of Congregation Beth Sholom in New York, Miss McDonald explains that Dr. King will make all efforts to attend the "I Have a Dream" musical performance.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Bill Green

Friday, August 2, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Bill Green that Dr. King is on an extended lecture tour at the moment. She ensures Mrs. Green that the letter and poem sent will receive his attention upon his return.

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

The Scope of Philosophy

Dr. King notes that Alfred North Whitehead, in “Concept of Nature,” “Religion in the Making” and “Principles of Natural Knowledge,” seeks to isolate the philosophy of science from metaphysics.

Letter from Solomon and Dorothy Zeltzer to Dr. and Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

The Zeltzer family send warm regards and support to the King family.

Letter from Karen Ladin to God

In her letter to God, Karen Ladin expresses concern for the plight of the Negro.

Letter from E. H. Williams to MLK

E. H. Williams writes to tell Dr. King of the great job he is doing speaking out on the Vietnam War.

Royalty Statement for Stride Toward Freedom

Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $97.89 for 3765 copies.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, March 20, 1964

Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend an urgent meeting of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights to discuss civil rights developments in the Senate. The 1964 Civil Rights Act was under debate at the time in the United States House of Representatives and Senate.

Bob Fitch Passes Letter to MLK Through Secretary McDonald

Bob Fitch makes mention of a letter that he feels would be of interest to Dr. King.

Letter from Mary Ann Johnson to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Mary Ann Johnson of Boston thanks Dr. King for taking a stand against the bombing in Vietnam. Johnson stresses that funds supplied for the war cripples the wages of working people in America.

MLK's Statement on Endorsing a 1960 Presidential Candidate

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

Dr. King states that the SCLC is a non-partisan organization and that he cannot endorse a political party or candidate. He then goes on to express gratitude for Senator Kennedy and Mayor Hartsfield for their continuous support and leadership.