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"SPAIN"

Letter from Rosslyn J. Shaw to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965
NEW ZEALAND, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Rosslyn J. Shaw invites Dr. King to speak to the New Zealand Universities Students' Association's annual Congress.

Letter from Bernard LaFayette, Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Before Mr. LaFayette leaves for New York to join the Spring Mobilization to end the war in Vietnam, he offer suggestions towards the housing problems that have occurred in Chicago. He states that there should be an urban renewal project that could possibly help low-income citizens afford respectable housing.

Challenge on Luther King

Thursday, November 18, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

The author of this article says that Rev. I. L. de Villiers' letter lacked moderation, reasoned argument and tolerance of a different point of view. He also says that anyone who advocates for racial equality is branded as communist and that Afrikaners are suffering as a result.

Letter from a Disillusioned Supporter to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, Nebraska (NE), Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Ohio (OH), Pennsylvania (PA)

An anonymous author, who identifies himself as a "white Jew," explains his decision to withdraw financial support from Negro organizations and causes. The reasons for his lack of support include the death of two Jews in Philadelphia, who died aiding the Negro cause, and the rioting in cities.

Telegram from Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Mr. Spock invites Dr. King to send a representative to a discussion on the upcoming Washington Vietnam Mobilization.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Monday, June 6, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Massachusetts (MA), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), GERMANY, JAPAN, Louisiana (LA)

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Letter from Clarence Portericker to Mrs. King

New York, NY

Clarence Portericker, a student in New York, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King hoping that Dr. King's dream will come true.

Semi-Arianism

Dr. King records a definition of semi-Arianism.

Letter from Katarina Ungdomsrad to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden

Dr. King is invited to speak to the social democratic youth club "Katarina." The representatives of Katarina wish he would be able to speak "about peace in our time." The planned date of the event follows a day after Dr. King is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Parker

Dr. King sympathizes with the unfortunate plight of Mrs. Parker's financial situation and encourages her to remain steadfast.

Anthropology

Dr. King outlines and references ideas on anthropology.

Inter-Faith Mass Meeting

Sunday, June 11, 1967
Cincinnati, OH, Atlanta, GA

This program is for an Inter-Faith Mass Meeting that was co-sponsored by Mt. Zion Baptist Church and Zion Baptist Church. The meeting took place on June 11, 1967 and features Dr. King as the speaker.

Letter from MLK to Jack O'Dell

Friday, January 18, 1963
New York, NY

Dr. King requests that Mr. O'Dell makes a statement regarding the philosophy and methods of the SCLC. He explains the urgency of Mr. O'Dell's statement due to an investigation concerning O'Dell's Communist affiliations.

Letter from Jesse L. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Cleveland, OH

Jesse Jackson writes Dr. King in reference to the efforts of Operation Breadbasket and its fundraising successes. He also expresses to Dr. King the importance of the Support A Worker (SAW) program and encloses information regarding its development.

Letter from Rev. Samuel B. McKinney to MLK Regarding Travel Arrangements to Seattle

Monday, November 6, 1961
Washington (WA)

In this letter, Rev. McKinney reviews details regarding Dr. King's itinerary for his visit to Seattle. He mentions that the community has worked exceedingly hard to gain city-wide support for his first visit to the Pacific Northwest.

Letter from Sidney Eisenberger to MLK

Wednesday, December 20, 1961
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Sidney Eisenberger sends a donation and words of encouragement to Dr. King. He praises Dr. King's work, particularly the focus on political involvement. He humorously writes that he hopes that he will one day be so unconscious of color that he will "feel free to regard a negro auto driver with the same venomous hatred I give to white drivers."

Telegram from Stanley G. Grizzle to MLK

Monday, September 13, 1965
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA

Stanley G. Grizzle, Chairman of the Toronto chapter of the Martin Luther King Fund, urges Dr. King to accept the International Teach-In invitation.

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

Friday, November 4, 1966
Pittsburgh, PA, VIETNAM, California (CA), Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA)

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1961
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Montgomery, AL

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Letter from John R. Hanson to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965
Iowa (IA), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Hansen of Nebraska thanks Dr. King for the telegram he sent urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Democratic Representative informs Dr. King that he was one of the 86 Congressmen "who requested a roll call vote on the issue."

Itinerary for MLK with Handwritten Notes

Atlanta, GA, Baltimore, MD, New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

This itinerary from 1964 details Dr. King's traveling schedule and contains his handwritten notes with regard to discovering one's purpose in life.

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Ralph David Avernathy

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, GHANA, HOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE), NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, SWEDEN, FRANCE

This biographical sketch of Dr. Abernathy outlines his positions, recognitions, education, travel experience and personal life. Dr. Abernathy served as President of the SCLC after Dr. King's death and also served as a member of the NAACP, and Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Telegram from James A. Dombrowski to Lindsay Almond Jr.

Richmond, VA

James A. Dombrowski urges J. Lindsay Almond to take a stand against segregation in the city of Lynchburg. This urgency emerged as a result of the jailing of six students who sitting-in at a local diner.

Letter to Senator Robert Kennedy from MLK

Wednesday, March 2, 1966
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

Dr. King applauds Senator Robert Kennedy for his statement on Vietnam. Both Robert Kennedy and former President John F.Kennedy contributed to the overall political philosophy and concept of a world of diversity. In addition, Dr. King mentions several political entities of progression due to the intellect and partnership with Senator Kennedy.

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.

Letter from Israel Goldstein to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964
ISRAEL

Israel Goldstein congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize and extends an invitation to the King family to visit his home in Jerusalem.

Letter from Mrs. W. J. Givan to MLK about Unsavory Association

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

In this letter Mrs. Givan expresses her dissatisfaction with Dr. King on how "prominent Negroes" are often photographed with "unsavory whites."

Letter from Nona Collins to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), VIETNAM

Nona Collins, Legislative Chairman of the Germantown Branch of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dr. King in support of his stance on civil rights and the Vietnam War.

Letter from Rev. S. A. Owen to MLK

Friday, November 13, 1964

In this letter, Reverend S. A. Owen of the Tennessee Baptist M. & E. Convention congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Immortality

Dr. King writes that the belief in immortality by scholars in different disciplines suggests that while immortality cannot be proved nor has it been disproved.