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Day of the Lord

Dr. King writes about the "Day of the Lord," as mentioned in the Old Testament book, Zephaniah.

Postcard Congratulating MLK for Receiving the Nobel Prize

Louise Dekker-Brus congratulates Dr. King on the Nobel Peace Prize and writes that their newspaper says that, in King, America has its Joan of Arc.

Letter from Eleanor Bell Barnard to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Eleanor Bell Barnard expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's position on Vietnam and Civil Rights. Ms. Barnard also describes to Dr. King how his work is motivation to those who are unemployed.

Why the Christian Must Oppose Segregation

This draft examines segregation and the reason Dr. King deems it his responsibility to discuss the matter.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

Press Statement by MLK About President Johnson's Address on Selma

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Dr. King lauds President Johnson's speech to a joint session of Congress, which he describes as an eloquent, unequivocal and passionate plea for human rights. This statement and the President's address occurred during the height of the Selma voting rights campaign.

Biography of MLK

Margaret B. Young details the events and accomplishments of Dr. King's life.

Letter to MLK from the Peace Research Institute

Saturday, November 28, 1964

The Peace Research Institute of Oslo congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize and further expresses their interest of having Dr. King speak at a seminar on nonviolence. The institute is starting a research project on nonviolence with a focus on observing inter-group conflicts.

Letter from Eula Shaw to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Calling Dr. King "The Trouble Maker of the United States," Mrs. Shaw criticizes Dr. King's methods in the Civil Rights Movement. She argues that a "campaign of love is in order" rather than demonstrations.

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

Letter from Rev. Jesse Jackson to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967

In an effort to make Operation Breadbasket successful ,the SCLC held seminars to help the negro businessmen develop their businesses. Jackson invites Dr. King and anyone else he wants to bring as an informal resource during the seminar.

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

Tuesday, April 21, 1964

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

MLK's Reply to an Invitation

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King regrets to inform Robin Skuce of his inability to accept her invitation to speak at a seminar for a Canadian high school under the auspice of the United Nations Association in Canada. Dr. King informs Miss Skuce that he must decline her offer due to preparation of several SCLC programs scheduled for the following year.

Draft: The Time for Freedom Has Come

Tuesday, May 1, 1962

In this draft of Dr. King's article, "The Time for Freedom Has Come," he discusses the role of African American students in the Civil Rights Movement. He praises the commitment and determination of students and credits them with the desegregation of lunch counters. He also identifies with the students' frustration with the slowness of forward progress in the struggle for equality. The article was published in New York Times Magazine on September 10, 1961.

Musical Composition by C. Bosserman

This untitled musical composition by C. Bosserman alludes to the White race, urging the White race to join the human race.

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.

Letter from K. Emmons to MLK

K. Emmons proposes to Dr. King that Christians should put God and Jesus above "fumbling politicians." K. Emmons also comments on soldiers in Vietnam.

Letter from Thomas Hejzlar to MLK

Friday, December 1, 1967

Student Thomas Hejzlar of Czechoslovakia writes to Dr. King requesting an autograph. He includes a postcard for Dr. King to sign and return.

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Sunday, February 20, 1966

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William S. Thompson

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to William Thompson's letter inviting Dr. King to address the National Bar Association. She explains that Dr. King's calendar shows that he will not be able to attend the event due to his travels.

The Central Presbyterian Church Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

Elmer Elsea enlightens Dr. King on how his involvement with the previous Holy Week brought joy and blessings. Mr. Elsea discovers Dr. King will be returning to the Holy Land of Jerusalem for the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom. Mr. Elsea encourages Dr. King to utilize Citexco Tours to conduct his expedition.

The Casualties of The War In Vietnam

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Dr. King speaks on behalf of the United States presence in Vietnam at a symposium held in Los Angeles, California. He addresses the moral, social, and political causalities that arise as result of war. Moreover, he urges the powers that be to allocate resources for good and rather than evil.

I've Been to the Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King gave this address at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee the night before he was assassinated. He called for nonviolent protest and a boycott of Memphis area businesses in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers strike. Conveying a sense of foreboding, he not only recounted a near-death experience when he was stabbed near the heart, but also spoke of the possibility of his own demise at the hands of those who opposed him.

Receipt for Sigrid L. Sharp

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $100 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Mary Sarvis. Dr. King makes reference to an enclosed receipt of the contribution.

Letter from John D. Silvera to MLK

Thursday, March 15, 1962

John D. Silvera proposes several mass media initiatives to Dr. King. Attached to this letter is a memorandum with additional information.

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK

Thursday, November 17, 1966

Mr. Sandperl writes to Dr. King regarding the direction of the SCLC. He suggest that the SCLC continue to represent social change and uphold the principles of nonviolence. However, in order to succeed, Mr. Sandperl believes that it should be done from a universal view, instead of from a Negro perspective.

Telegrams Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Participants of the Selma-Montgomery March send telegrams to defend the integrity of the march against allegations of sexual immorality.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Friday, April 28, 1967

Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding his recent trip to Mississippi. Kennedy tells of his engagement with the Department of Agriculture and the Subcommittee on Employment in efforts to help relieve the present hunger crisis. The focus is "to provide more and better food" to people with low income or no income at all. He also wants the committee and Congress to pay close attention to this subject and encourages an analysis of the food stamp system.

Man (Cause of Sin)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.