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Letter from Dora McDonald to David Mays

Tuesday, October 22, 1963

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora E. McDonald responds to David Mays of Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee. As requested, she encloses a copy of a speech Dr. King gave in Washington. Ms. McDonald also informs that a recording of the speech is available for purchase from the Council for United Civil Rights Leadership.

Letter from Mr. Harry W. Allison, Ph.D. to MLK

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Mr. Allison, a white clinical psychologist, expresses his support of Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Schleiermacher and the Bible

Dr. King references a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher regarding the relationship between religion and sacred texts.

People In Action: Literacy Bill Dies

Saturday, May 26, 1962

Dr. King shares his disappointment with the Senate vote that stopped the 1962 Voting Rights Bill, then known as the Literacy Bill. The bill would have eliminated the literacy tests that Dr. King believed were used to keep African-Americans of all education levels from qualifying to vote.

The Practical Value of Religion

Dr. King writes about Albrecht Ritschl's views on the practical value of religion.

Letter from John E. Farrow to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

John Farrow writes Dr. King to suggest he tread softly as he continues the fight for social justice. Farrow states that whites will fight back with brute force against desegregation and civil rights for all. Farrow urges Dr. King to offer knowledge but not seek to antagonize whites during the March on Washington and his future efforts for the civil rights movement.

Letter from Ann & John Flynn

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

In this letter, Ann Flynn requests a copy of the text of Dr. King's speech made at Riverside Church.

The Drum Major Instinct Sermon Outline

Monday, February 5, 1968

Dr. King outlines on scraps of paper his great sermon based on Mark 10:37. Everyone wants to be first, to get attention, he says, starting with our first cry as a baby. Adults want to do good and be praised. If the drum major instinct is not harnessed, the personality is distorted and we become boastful, gossip, put others down. On a societal level, this leads to exclusive social groups, racial prejudice and war. King states that Jesus’ answer is to dedicate this great force to worthy ends – goodness, moral excellence, generosity, kindness and service. .

Institute for Human Relations LBJ Leaflet

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Letter from Edward P. Gottlieb to Editor, New York Times

Thursday, November 23, 1967

Edward P. Gottlieb writes to the Editor of the New York Times expressing his concern on racial pride. He begins by stating that racial pride is to be deplored and discouraged. Gettlieb concludes with the notion that an African American will feel free only after he is able to explore his own history and culture so he may take from it what he wants for his personal enhancement.

Jesus

Dr. King makes reference to Jesus' recognition among those not of the Christian faith.

The Trinity

Dr. King analyzes Peter Abelard's argument on the interpretation of the Trinity as three attributes of one substance.

Seating List for Pacem In Terris II

This document is an alphabetical seating list of participants for the Pacem In Terris II (Peace on Earth) Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland.

MLK Flyer: "Integrated Bus Suggestions"

Wednesday, December 19, 1956

In this document, Dr. King and the Reverend W.J. Powell list under "The Montgomery Improvement Association" guidelines to mitigate potential conflicts in the transition to integrated buses. The principle of nonviolence is present throughout the document.

Materialism

Dr. King documents a quote by Robert Flint, a Scottish theologian and philosopher in reference to "materialism" from the "Baird Lectures."

Letter from A.J. Hoffman to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

In this letter, A.J. Hoffman offers a few words of admiration to Dr. King for his work for the "brotherhood of man."

Letter from Phillip L. Girard to MLK

Wednesday, February 15, 1967

In this letter, Phillip L. Girard informs Dr. King of his intent to donate Girard College to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, in the event of the Girard will being violated.

Letter from Solomon and Dorothy Zeltzer to Dr. and Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

The Zeltzer family send warm regards and support to the King family.

Letter from Glenn Greenwood to MLK

Tuesday, August 20, 1963

Glenn Greenwood informs Dr. King of a directive the United States Army issued that forbids all US Army personnel from participating in civil rights demonstrations. Greenwood expresses that this is a huge "infringement on freedom of assembly" and should be brought to the public's attention immediately.

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.

Science (Definition)

Dr. King records a definition of science.

Telegram from The Mathis Family to MLK

Monday, April 15, 1963

The Mathis family sends their support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham City Jail.

Letter from Richard Beal to MLK

Saturday, January 21, 1967

Mr. Beal informs Dr. King that he believes the best way for African Americans to gain the support of Caucasian Americans is for them to earn their respect.

SCLC Flyer: Going Out of Business

The Fort Worth chapter of the SCLC issued this flyer advising its fellow Negro residents to boycott Bill Sodd's Meat Store because of discrimination.

More and Faster

Sunday, January 5, 1964

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.

Statement from Walter E. Fauntroy Regarding the Progress of Urban Renewal and Redevelopment

Walter E. Fauntroy, chairman of the Housing and Urban Renewal Committee of the Interdenominational Ministers' Alliance, makes a statement regarding the progress of urban renewal and redevelopment in Washington, D.C. He discusses five steps for a unified approach to meeting the communities housing problems. Two notable steps include full and effective citizen's participation in all community plans, and adequate and humane solutions in rehousing all families.

Schedule for Oslo Visit

This document outlines Dr. King's twelve-day travel schedule to Oslo, Norway to receive the Nobel Peace Award. The itinerary includes various banquets, speaking engagements and meetings with individuals including the leaders of the British Council of Churches and the mayor of Oslo.

Third Level (Cont.)

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Thank You Note to Martin Luther King Jr. from Mt. Olive Baptist Church

Sunday, July 30, 1967

This letter was written to Dr.King from the Mt.Olive Baptist Church. They were sending a donation to the SCLC and thanking them for rebuilding their church that had been burned.

Letter from MLK to Society of Brothers

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Dr. King thanks the Society of Brothers for its recent donation to the SCLC and explains why the donation is important to the work and needs of the SCLC.