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Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Babcock for her substantial contribution and lets her know that her continued generosity and abiding faith in the cause have served to sustain and renew the strength of the SCLC.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, May 28, 1964
New York, NY

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King, along with others, that the Detroit News will run installments for "Why We Cant Wait." They are also told that the copyright will be in Dr. King's name and that credit will be given to Harper and NAL.

Information on the National Welfare Rights Organization

Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Columbus, OH, Chicago, IL, Pittsburgh, PA

The National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO) is a nationwide membership organization of welfare recipients. The goals of the NWRO are to develop a system that guarantees adequate income, dignity, justice and democracy.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Grayson

Thursday, February 15, 1962
West Virginia (WV), PUERTO RICO, Mississippi (MS)

Dora McDonald informs William Grayson that Dr. King's schedule does not permit him to make any more appearances in the year of 1962. Miss McDonald expresses her deep apologies for Dr. King's inabilities to attend.

Letter from SCLC to Lizzie Williams

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
Selma, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

A representative of the Citizenship Education Program, an initiative of the SCLC, informs Mrs. Willis of recent travel plans to Dorchester, GA. Dorchester academy played a vital role in the struggle for voting and civil rights.

Letter from O. L. Sherrill to Ralph David Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

The Executive Secretary of the General Baptist State Convention of North Carolina requests multiple copies of the program from Dr. King's funeral service.

Letter from Hosea Williams to MLK

Wednesday, December 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Hosea Williams submits his resignation as a staff member of the SCLC. He also requests a meeting with the Steering Committee and Dr. King to discuss unfinished items related to the SCLC.

"Meaning of Georgia Elections"

Saturday, July 3, 1965
Georgia (GA), Michigan (MI), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King speaks about the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE). He also talks about the political advancements that were made in the south.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, THAILAND, CHINA, SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY), SOUTH KOREA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

SCLC Newsletter: March 1963

Friday, March 1, 1963
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), New York (NY), Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, Atlanta, GA

SCLC highlights its affiliate activities, fundraisers and efforts to rebuild burned churches in this newsletter from March of 1963. One of the cover stories focuses on the repeal of segregation laws in Albany, Georgia. The "Profile of the Month" article features Milton A. Reid and discusses his contributions to the Civil Rights Movement.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa: Advance Registration

Monday, January 9, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, California (CA)

Theodore E. Brown, the Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, sends a letter with attached registration forms for the Third Biennial National Conference.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

These sermon notes outline the inevitable fall of evil. Dr. King uses the work of influential American historian, Charles A. Beard to prove this claim. "A graphic example of this truth" is found in ancient proverbs that Dr. King aims to examine in detail.

Hegel's Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on Hegel's social ethics. He quotes, "The principle triad here consist of law in the sense of abstract right, morality, and social ethics." According to Hegel, abstract right may be defined as being a person and respecting other people, while morality refers to one's conscience and social ethics regards another triad, being family, civil society, and the state.

Letter from MLK to Art Simmons

Tuesday, April 5, 1966
FRANCE

Dr. King extends his gratitude to Mr. Simmons for the evening at the Palais des Sports.

Correspondence: Letter to Dr.King from Miss Marelda G. Fontenot (Jan. 8, 1965)

Thursday, January 7, 1965
Louisiana (LA)

In this letter Marelda Fontenot encloses a copy of the school paper, "The Paraclete." The paper features an article about Dr. King receiving the Nobel Peace Price. She offers her sincere gratitude and admiration for Dr. King and his accomplishments.

Critique of the Social Gospel

Dr. King used this outline while studying at Crozer Theological Seminary. The topics listed include: Social Contribution to Christianity, Contribution to Christian Social Philosophy, and the Sore Points of the Social Gospel.

Note from Harry Belafonte to MLK

New York, NY

Harry and Julie Belafonte congratulate Dr. King on receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Harry Belafonte is an American entertainer and social activist.

Telegram from Mrs. Frances Lucas to C. T. Vivian and Alvin Pitcher

Thursday, January 9, 1969
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Lucas informs Mr. Vivian and Mr. Pitcher of Mrs. King's unavailability to speak at the YMCA in Chicago. A memorial service in honor of Dr. King is scheduled on the same date in Atlanta.

Letter from John Olson to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Oklahoma (OK), Los Angeles, CA

John F. Olson, a fellow graduate of Boston University School of Theology, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak at Oklahoma City University.

Letter from Walter E. Fauntroy Regarding Dollars for Freedom Committee

Monday, March 26, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Fauntroy informs readers of an upcoming fundraising rally entitled "Dollars for Freedom." Mr. Fauntroy serves as Chairman for the SCLC's Dollars for Freedom Committee.

Letter from Shirley Leonard to MLK

Sunday, December 31, 1961
New York, NY

Shirley Leonard encloses a check for ten dollars to help Dr. King further integration.

Letter from Audrey Mingo to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967
ISRAEL, New Jersey (NJ)

Mrs. Mingo asks for detailed information regarding Dr. King's trips to the Holy Land and Africa.

103:15 General Correspondence 1967 (R)

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Reich suggests that Dr. King join the "other side" since he feels that the government is on the wrong side.

Autograph Request

Friday, August 19, 1966
Pittsburgh, PA, Montgomery, AL

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

VIETNAM, Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Letter from the United Church of Canada to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
CANADA

The United Church of Canada expresses appreciation in honor of Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. In addition, the author asks Dr. King to inaugurate a new series of lectureships to students for the Craddock Memorial Lectures.

Letter from Josephine Davis to Dr. King

Friday, June 24, 1966
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Josephine Davis tells Dr. King that they enjoyed the evening he spent with them. She then informs him that their prayers are with him and that he can look forward to financial help from "THOSE".

Letter from Ben J. Mack to Reverend Andrew Young

South Carolina (SC)

Ben Mack forwards to Reverend Young an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the annual banquet of the South Carolina Congress of Parents and Teachers.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The sender of this letter lists six main goals that should be accomplished in 1968. The sender pleads for Dr. King to take leadership in accomplishing these goals.

Letter from the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament to MLK

UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, Washington, D.C.

Canon L. John Collins, a founder of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, invites Dr. King to speak at a rally in Trafalgar Square in London, England. The proposed rally will be based on the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, and Collins would like to provide a direct link between the rally and the Washington March through the participation of both Bayard Rustin and Dr. King.