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Letter from J. L. Richard to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Reverend J. L. Richard, from Evergreen Baptist Church, sends prayers for Dr. King and the Negro race. Richard also sends a monetary contribution to the SCLC.

Class Notes: Obadiah

Dr. King writes about the book of Obadiah and knowledge.

David T. Doherty Letter of Request to Dr. King

Friday, February 10, 1967

Mr. Deherty, a PH.D candidate at Stanford University, asks Dr. King if he will answer a few questions regarding the influence of Henry David Thoreau on his philosophy of non-violence.

Letter from Marcel Bernfeld to MLK

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

Mr. Bernfeld writes Dr. King, letting him know that he published some of his work. He also asks Dr. King's permission to publish the "Letter from Birmingham Jail," in its entirety, with an introduction and notes. He encloses copies of his own speech for Dr. King's reading pleasure and expresses his well-wishes in closing.

Handwritten notecard regarding Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Bob Abel to MLK

In this letter Bob Abel encloses a contribution from a friend in England to Dr. King while also commenting on Vietnam and the link to Civil Rights.

Letter From Elizabeth Green to MLK

Monday, October 28, 1963

Elizabeth Green informs Dr. King of the news stories covering his appearance at Mount Holyoke College and encloses copies of the stories.

Some Information About Black Africa Culture

This document discusses various discoveries that have been made about African civilizations and their cultures.

Letter from Lottie Thomas to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Lottie Thomas, a Negro businesswoman from Alaska, requests Dr. King's help with her business. Mrs. Thomas informs Dr. King of the unjust treatment she has endured in Alaska and of her current financial tribulations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to A. Dale Fiers

Monday, October 17, 1966

Miss McDonald sends Dr. Fiers an expense statement for Dr. King's appearance in Dallas, Texas for the International Convention.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Frank Kuhlman about Support

In this letter Dr. King expresses his belated gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kuhlman for their letter of support. Dr. King also comments on nonviolence and the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson writes to express his regrets that Dr. King could not attend the White House's Community Leaders Conference. Johnson continues that he and the Equal Employment Opportunity Committee were thrilled with the support Dr. King provided to the conference despite his absence.

Letter from MLK to Frank B. Lowell

Monday, October 14, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Frank Lowell's letter regarding the SCLC's current mission. Dr. King briefly explains the nonviolent philosophy, the beliefs of the SCLC, and race relations in America.

Letter From Joan Daves to Clarence B. Jones

Monday, May 18, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Clarence B. Jones about the carbon of the letter sent to Dr. King regarding an excerpt from "Why We Can't Wait."

History

Dr. King references a quote from St. Paul regarding a theological perspective of history.

MLK Statement Regarding an Attack on the First Amendment

Monday, October 30, 1967

Dr. King addresses violations of First Amendment Rights in this statement regarding the events at Birmingham, Alabama in 1963.

Plea for the Poor to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Signing as "A Poor Person," this author urges Dr. King to remember that poverty transcends race. The author requests that Dr. King help the poor of all races, with an emphasis on promoting voter registration for all poor people.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to President Lyndon Johnson

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

A. Philip Randolph, the President of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters (an AFL-CIO affiliate), writes to President Johnson to urge him to convene a small group of national civil rights leaders to advise local leaders and businessmen on how to deal with the escalation of riots occurring all over the country.

Letter from John Roney to Dr. King

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Mr. Roney explains to Dr. King that the government will create oppressed social hierarchy within society. As a result, he requests that Dr. King responds to his plea or he will be believe that the rumors of government oppression are true.

Adverse Message from Dr. Douglas of Sarasota, FL

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

This message from Dr. Douglas was given over the telephone #525-1717 in Springfield, Illinois. Douglas discusses his beliefs on racism and communism in regards to Dr. King. He discusses how communist are the followers of Dr. King, and also how the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to King in order to cause a "communist world revolution." Bayard Rustin is described by Douglas as a "pervert, jail bird" close associate of Dr. King.

Man (Sin)

Dr. King writes about Jeremiah's loss of confidence in man, reflecting on the biblical passage Jeremiah 9: 4-6.

Letter from Emma Kramer to MLK

Wednesday, July 22, 1964

The secretary of the Speakers Bureau at The Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago contacts Dr. King regarding a number of new and pending speaking engagements. The two new speaking engagement requests are from Augustana College and Barat College. The list of pending engagements includes Villanova University, Duchess Community College, Barat College and the University of California, Riverside.

MLK Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines a definition of "Nature". This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Frances H. Vicario

Monday, February 26, 1968

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mrs. Vicario and the Chemical Bank New York Trust Company for their generous contribution to the SCLC. He explains how the contribution will help in a time of need as the SCLC enters the critical phase of their ten-year ministry.

Letter from MLK to Katherine Gunning

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Katharine Gunning for sending him a copy of the letter she sent to President Johnson. He urges that "those of us who seek peaece through non-violence make our consciences and numbers known to the men who run our government."

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to Dr. King regarding the 1968 election. He argues against Dr. King's picks for the best potential Republican and Democrat presidential candidates, saying that Vice President Humphrey would have a good chance at the White House if he were to publicly break with President Johnson over the Vietnam War.

Letter to Representatives of Harper & Row and N.A.L from Joan Daves Regarding "Why We Cant Wait"

Tuesday, April 14, 1964

This memo serves to inform all parties involved with the publishing of "Why We Can't Wait" of the arranged prepublication agreements made by Mrs. Joan Daves.

Moral Progress

Dr. King describes moral progress as endless struggle toward "an infinite goal," which will lead to "happiness."

Letter from Mary Ann Quilter to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Ms. Quilter informs Dr. King of a political event taking place on campus and asks him for any campaign literature he can provide and a picture of himself.

Letter from MLK to Otis Warren

Thursday, July 22, 1965

Dr. King acknowledges the contribution made by Otis Warren of Baltimore, Maryland to the SCLC. He highlights new initiatives that the SCLC will undertake to boost Negro political participation in Southern states and a project to tackle the ghettos of Northern cities. Dr. King humbly notes that these projects could not move forward without the generosity of individuals like Warren.