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Letter from Terrie to MLK

Saturday, March 2, 1968
Atlanta, GA

The author informs Dr. King of her
inability to continue working for the SCLC due to conflicting personal issues and emotional instability. She asserts that the work of the SCLC is too important for her to remain "jumping around in the organization." She also informs Dr. King that the SCLC is family and that she is only leaving for personal reasons. Lastly, she requests that other primary members of the organization are informed of this departure.

Walter Reuther Remarks at the March on Washington

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Walter P. Reuther, President of the International Union, UAW, expounds upon the cause of freedom and democracy in America from the perception of the external world. Reuther highlights the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and how they have been denied to African Americas living as "second-class" citizens. He further discusses the necessary duties of the United States Congress to recognize and initiate civil rights programs.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 4, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Ms. Daves informs Dr. King of Harper and Row's efforts on behalf of "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." She includes sales figures and discusses the "variance[s]" for the total number of copies.

Emotionalism in Religion

Dr. King records a quote from a book entitled "The Gift of Tongues, A Study in the Pathological Aspects of Christianity".

I've Been to the Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
Memphis, TN, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King gave this address at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee the night before he was assassinated. He called for nonviolent protest and a boycott of Memphis area businesses in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers strike. Conveying a sense of foreboding, he not only recounted a near-death experience when he was stabbed near the heart, but also spoke of the possibility of his own demise at the hands of those who opposed him.


Dr. King records a quote on mystery from Robert Flint's "The Philosophy of History."

Letter from MLK to Helen Anderson

Friday, February 9, 1968
California (CA)

This letter is in acknowledgement and appreciation of contributions to the SCLC from Mrs. Helen Anderson to Dr. King which was overlooked in the mail.

Letter from Richard Nixon to MLK

Thursday, June 18, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C.

Vice President Richard M. Nixon expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's participation at the recent Religious Leaders Conference on Equal Job Opportunity. Nixon emphasizes the need for ongoing collaboration between local and national leaders to advance critical policy initiatives.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
New York, NY

This royalty statement reflects the amount earned for the Japanese edition of "Stride Toward Freedom".

Letter from Sue M. Stiles to MLK

Sunday, May 24, 1964

Sue Stiles writes Dr. King to assert her viewpoints and beliefs according to her childhood and upbringing. In expressing these truths, Stiles affirms her support in Dr. King's practices in human rights and encloses a financial contribution.

Letter from Norman R. Snook to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Mr. Norman Snook of the United Christian Center invites Dr. King to come preach at the Ohio State University United Chapel.

Letter From Jimmy Williams to MLK

Sunday, February 25, 1968
Arkansas (AR), South Africa, PHILIPPINES

Jimmy Williams, a U.S. Air Force officer, writes Dr. King requesting assistance in protesting his unjust termination from Officers Training School.

Letter from Dr. King to W. Daniels

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. responds to W. Daniels letter regarding a speaking invitation, March 12, 1968. Dr. King regrettably informs him that his intensive schedule restricts his ability to accept speaking engagements, for the next eight or nine months.

For Healing of The Nations

Sunday, February 14, 1954

The National Council of Churches of Christ in the USA publishes this brochure on peace and race relations, calling Christians into action with the responsibility of making brotherhood a reality. Guidelines are presented for individual Christians and Churches to follow in order to create a world full of love and free of racial turmoil.

Dr. King Announces Appointment of Director of New SCLC Project to Train Urban Negro Leaders

Wednesday, January 10, 1968
GEORGIA, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Missouri (MO), New Jersey (NJ), Birmingham, AL, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

In a press release, Dr. King announces Rev. T.Y. Rogers as the Director of the Negro ministerial training, a project created by the SCLC. The purpose of this program is to provide training seminars for ministers, which will ultimately assist congregational members with employment, economic development, voter registration, and education.

Letter from MLK to Artist Committee for SCLC

Friday, May 5, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

This letter expresses Dr. King's regards and deep appreciation to the Artist Committee for their generous contribution. He communicates gratitude on behalf of so many who benefit from the work made possible from their support. Additionally, Dr. King communicates the continued strength and effectiveness of the SCLC in promoting negro-white unity, non-violence, justice and equality.

Letter from Levi Eshkol to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967

Levi Eshkol, the Prime Minster of Jerusalem, welcomes Dr. King to lead a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Letter from MLK to Third Grader Debbie Bass

Thursday, June 3, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Debbie Bass of New York for her thoughtful letter. Debbie Bass is a third grade student from the Birch Lane School of Massapequa Park. Dr. King expresses that her letter encourages everyone to hasten their efforts in the fight for freedom.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rennie Kiah

Friday, July 29, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

Dr. King and Dora McDonald express their gratitude for Mr. Rennie L. Kiah's suggestions. Mr. Kiah brings awareness to Dr. King about the "unkempt" property owned by the City of Atlanta. Dr. King attempts to contact the City Manager to clean up the property that is next to Ebenezer Church.

Mass Mailing from the Model Inner city Community Organization

Thursday, February 23, 1967
Washington, D.C.

This is a form letter from the Reverend Walter E. Fauntroy informing the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. about Dr. King's visit to help revitalize the area.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report

Wednesday, August 24, 1966
Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Ohio (OH), Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

This document contains the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report. Randolph T. Blackwell, former program director of the SCLC is now director of the Southern Rural Action Project.

WBTV Editorial: "King's Bedfellows"

Monday, February 19, 1968
North Carolina (NC), PUERTO RICO, Cambridge, MA, Washington, D.C.

The content of this document suggested that Dr. King break ties with leaders Stokley Carmichael and H. Rap Brown, due to their stance on violence as a weapon. At the bottom of this document, is an invitation for Dr. King, H. Rap Brown and Stokley Carmichael to respond.

Order of Commitment

Wednesday, October 18, 1967
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

An Order of Commitment was issued for Dr. King on October 18, 1967 following a conviction for contempt of Court. The charge stemmed from a matter dating back to the 1963 Birmingham campaign. He was sentenced to five consecutive days in Jefferson County Jail, the famed location where "Letter from Birmingham Jail" was conceived.

Letter from MLK to Ann Patricia Herring

Wednesday, September 18, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King congratulates Ann Herring on her new marriage and apologizes for misfiling her earlier letters asking him to perform her marriage ceremony. He assures her that if he had seen her letters, he would have made his best attempt to perform the ceremony.

Statement to the Press by MLK

Friday, January 22, 1965
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL

This document is Dr. King's statement to the press as a result of a Teachers March for voting rights, in Selma, Alabama.

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

Philadelphia, PA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN), New York, NY

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, August 15, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Eugene Cook, Attorney General of Georgia, writes to Mr. Walker regarding Dr. King's refusal to reveal the name of the persons recommending and interviewing Jack O'Dell.

Proposal for Black Independence

Al Shabazz writes up a program for Black independence. The proposal suggests two program options for leaders to choose from. Once the program has been decided the leader would go out and gather the opinion of the masses. Next, the program would implement unconventional education along with employment and survival skills. The program also promotes an independent nation with alliances from those of all races. The program promotes black revolution and the demise of the elite White Supremacist.


Dr. King defines annihilationism as a belief regarding the death of the wicked.

Robert Greene's Resolutions

Thursday, February 1, 1968

Robert Greene, of Puerto Rican and African American ancestry, resolves to censure the State of New York. He lists a plethora of racist activities and "Orwellian deceptions" as causes.