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Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Friday, July 17, 1964
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Senator Joseph S. Clark informs Dr. King of the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's support.

Letter from MLK to a Donor

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King expresses gratitude for a contribution received by The Montgomery Improvement Association.

Letter from Arthur L. Kinsolving to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Arthur Kingsolving sends his thanks to Dr. King for remembering him and sending a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Freedom

Dr. King quotes Tillich in sketching his views on man's freedom in relation to destiny.

Letter from Arnold S. Zander to MLK

Thursday, December 22, 1966
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Atlantic City, NJ

Mr. Zander, President of United World Federalists, invites Dr. King to serve on the organization's National Advisory Board.

Letter from Lawrence Friedman to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
California (CA)

The former president of the Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation, Lawrence J. Friedman, writes Dr. King to inform him of a letter concerning the Kennedy assassination, which was written on an unauthorized piece of stationery. The letter is dated January 29, 1968, but The Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation was dissovled under the laws of the State of California on May 16, 1966. The letter was signed by Donald Freed. Lawrence P. Friedman wishes to make it clear that he had no knowledge of the letter being sent.

103:15 General Correspondence 1967 (R)

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Reich suggests that Dr. King join the "other side" since he feels that the government is on the wrong side.

Why Negroes Are Still Angry

Friday, July 1, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI, Connecticut (CT), Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

American journalist Victor Bernstein details for Redbook why Negroes are still angry in the face of the apparent success of the Civil Rights Movement. He points out that the Movement has enabled many whites to see that integration and equal rights are right, but still knowingly choose to behave as if they are wrong.

Letter from Irving Davis to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA

Irvin Davis of Celebrities Art Exhibits invites Dr. King to tour with the organization depending on his artistic abilities.

Revolution in the Delta: Farm Hands Go on Strike

Mississippi (MS)

David R. Underhill discusses the strike of farm laborers in various Mississippi Delta cities. Underhill highlights strike procedures, methods, and locations.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. T. Kane

Monday, March 25, 1968
Delaware (DE)

In this letter, dated March 25, 1968, Dr. King expresses his gratitude for the Kane's generous contribution of one hundred dollars to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation.

Netherlands Request Autograph

Saturday, December 16, 1967
NETHERLANDS

Theo Roling, of The Netherlands, urges Dr. King to promote peace in the world. He requests Dr. King's signature for his Nobel Prize autograph collection.

Letter from John Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover thanks Dr. King for his telegram concerning FBI agents in Alabama.

Letter from Dean George W. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, October 19, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Virginia (VA)

George Jones writes Dr. King on behalf of his brother-in-law, Captain Yancey Martin, who is subject to a trial based on previous accusations. Jones hopes that Dr. King is able to utilize his role with the S.C.L.C. to assist Captain Martin.

Freedom

Dr. King writes on the topic of "freedom," according to Jeremiah 1:5.

Letter from Elaine Hinde to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH)

Elaine Hinde inquires about materials and information from Dr. King in regards to Choice '68.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Gwen B. Geiges about Moral Support

Maryland (MD), VIETNAM

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Mrs. Geiges to thank her for her letter expressing support of his work in the movement.

Telegram to MLK from Wolfgang Grimmig

Berlin, Germany

Dr. King gets invited to a lecture tour that will take place during the spring of 1966.

Oberlin College Commencement

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., PUERTO RICO, VIETNAM, INDIA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New Hampshire (NH)

This issue of the Oberlin Alumni Magazine features commencement articles and photos as well as Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution, Dr. King’s address to the graduating class.

Judgment

Dr. King cites the Old Testament Book of Isaiah regarding the subject judgment.

At Your Service!

Washington, D.C.

The Washington Office of the Council for Christian Social Action chronicles the events of the organization including various seminars and cooperation with other organizations.

Letter from Virginia M. Burke & Phyllis M. Banks to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963
Milwaukee, WI, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Virginia Burke and Phyllis Banks express their interest in distributing "The Negro Is Your Brother", better known as "Letter from Birmingham Jail", to Wisconsin leaders to inform them of the goals and aspirations of Dr. King and his following. Burke and Banks explain that while the document had appeared in multiple publications, they feel that it has yet to reach the wide audience it deserves. They ask Dr. King's permission to reprint and distribute the document if he holds the copyright.

"Life" by Eudora V. Savage

Pittsburgh, PA

In this poem, Ms. Savage expresses her views on "Life."

Treasury Spells Out Equal Employment Requirements for Banks

Friday, February 17, 1967
Washington, D.C.

This press release details the requirements for compliance with the Treasury Department's Equal Employment regulations.

The Eternality of God Verses The Temporality of Man

This document is an outline of the sermon titled "The Eternality of God Versus the Temporality of Man." In the first two sections, Dr. King contrasts the time-conditioned nature of man with God, who transcends time. The final portion highlights a significant fact that God is absolute and unchangeable.

Letter from Donald Godbey to MLK Regarding Cooperation

Thursday, June 15, 1967
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

In this letter, Donald Godbey offers Dr. King various suggestions on how men and women of all backgrounds can join together in unity.

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Regarding Wiley Branton

Thursday, April 29, 1965
Washington, D.C.

In this letter the office of the Vice President informs Dr. King of the new role of Wiley Branton to serve as Executive Secretary of the President's Council on Equal Opportunity.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA, THAILAND, CHINA, SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY), SOUTH KOREA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Tuesday, October 10, 1967
Albany, GA

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.