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Letter from Rev. Hedley W. Plunkett to MLK

Friday, March 3, 1967

Reverend Hedley W. Plunkett of Belfast, Northern Ireland, invites Dr. King to include the city on his schedule the next time he comes to Europe. Plunkett describes his interest in King's work and Ireland's own "Color Bar."

Letter from Stephen Goodyear to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

Stephen Goodyear expresses appreciation for an inscribed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?", as well as his enthusiasm regarding Dr. King's attendance at the National Conference for New Politics.

Letter from Marguerite B. Pilling to Dr. Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

Marguerite B. Pilling writes Dr. Abernathy to show her support of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes the Negro could actually bring the United States back to a time of decency by bringing back prayer in public schools and removing violence from TV.

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

Miss McDonald writes Dr. King regarding his recent mail and messages. Included are numerous invitations and missed telephone calls.

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1967

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

Style

Dr. King references Voltaire and his views regarding the impact of the style in which one chooses to express himself.

Letter from William Woodall to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Mr. Woodall relays instructions from God concerning Dr. King's next march.

Letter from the Assistant Secretary of State to Fay Ramsey Regarding Vietnam

Thursday, August 17, 1967

In this letter from Dixon Donnelley (the Assistant Secretary of State), Fay Ramsey receives thanks for a letter she sent President Johnson and an explaination of the state's logic regarding the Vietnam situation.

The Southern Patriot: Today's Hero The Negro Child

This column highlights the brave children who endured the hardships of hostile mobs as they blazed the trail for school integration.

News Release from SCLC about MLK's telegram concerning Violations of the Fair Labor Standards Acts

Thursday, March 15, 1962

This SCLC press release highlights Dr. King's request for the U.S. Department of Labor to investigate labor violations and discrimination at shrimp factories in Georgia. Dr.King asserts that African-American workers have been harrassed and underpaid.

MSGR. Victor G. Moser's Statements Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Monday, April 26, 1965

Victor G. Moser recounts the activities that took place during the march on Montgomery ,which was one of a serious, dedicated, even religious commitment to a project which would really bring out the serious injustice being perpetrated upon a persecuted and disadvantaged people.

Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

Tuesday, December 1, 1959

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

Letter to MLK Requesting Information to Rebut Allegations of Communist Affiliation

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

Ernest O. Norquist, Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the Illinois Synod of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., commends Dr. King for his recent speech at Illinois Wesleyan University. He alerts Dr. King of the Birch Society’s attempts to spread allegations of his communist’s affiliations, and recommends a booklet refuting the charges and offers to help prepare and print it. Norquist requests a meeting with Dr. King in Chicago for himself, and other executive members of the Illinois Council of Churches to discuss how they can support Dr. King’s work.

Letter from MLK to Earl Hall

Friday, July 14, 1967

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mr. Earl Hall, who sent a letter to the "National Observer" in defense of Dr. King.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

This draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech lends recognition to the nonviolent practices of those engaged in the fight for equality and civil rights.

Letter from C.G. Gomillion to Dr. Randolph Blackwell

Wednesday, August 18, 1965

C.G. Gomillion writes Dr. Randolph Blackwell requesting reimbursement for paying the bail to release SCLC driver Walter Franklin. Franklin was arrested and released in Tuskegee, but was arrested again in Selma because the SCLC failed to pay his fine.

Letter from David Cole Gordon to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

David Cole Gordon, Consulting Editor for American Humanist Association, requests that Dr. King provide an essay for their upcoming feature, "This is How I Live."

Civil Rights Drive by SCLC and Other Groups Wins Open Housing Victory in Louisville

Saturday, December 30, 1967

This 1967 SCLC news release details the passage of a law forbidding racial discrimination in housing in Louisville, Kentucky. It also details the role that SCLC and its sister organizations had in bring about this legislation.

Telegram from MLK and Coretta King to the McCall Family

In this telegram, Mr. and Mrs. King give their condolences to the McCall family as a result of the death of Walter McCall.

Letter from John and Eva Fillion to MLK about Moral Support

Thursday, March 14, 1968

This letter dated March 14, 1968 was written to Dr. King from John and Eva Fillion. In this letter they thank Dr. King for promoting the cause of freedom and tell him how grateful they are for all of his work in the fight for justice.

MLK Manuscript: Why We Can't Wait

This document reflects one page of the original manuscript of "Why We Can't Wait." "Why We Can't Wait" is a book by Martin Luther King, Jr. about the civil rights struggle against racial segregation in the United States, and specifically in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter to MLK from Violet Calvert

Thursday, July 1, 1965

Violet Calvert expresses to Dr. King that she has little money but she uses letters to fight for equality. She shows Dr. King a copy of one of her published letters.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Lucks Regarding Assistant Pastor

In this letter, Dr. King advises Rev. Lucks on choosing an assistant pastor.

Totalitarianism

Dr. King quotes a modern historian on their ideas of totalitarianism.

Postcard Addressed to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Wednesday, April 24, 1968

Father Martin Genghty of New York issued this postcard to Rev. Ralph Abernathy following Dr. King's assassination. The holy leader referred to Rev. Abernathy as "the Good Shepherd for his flock."

Permission Form from Friendship House to MLK for Signature

Sunday, December 11, 1966

This document, from James G. Duignan of Friendship House, is sent to Dr. King for his signature, granting permission to reproduce, distribute and or sell recorded copies of two speeches.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, August 16, 1962

Cass Canfield, of Harper and Row, requests for Dr. King to give commentary on Louis Lomax's book "The Negro Revolt."

Letter from Warren R. Austin to MLK

Wednesday, September 17, 1958

In this letter, Mr. Austin, Honorary Chairman of The Committee of One Million, writes to Dr. King and encloses an advanced review copy of the "Black Book on Red China." The book is scheduled to be published soon and was commissioned by the Committee of One Million as an "international public service."

Letter from Indian Agency to Harper & Row

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this letter, the writer requests permission to translate Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" into Marahati, one of the regional languages in India. The author mentions that some of the social problems in India are similar problems "the Negro" faced in the United States.