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Letter from Al Hearin to MLK about Public Appearance

Monday, October 30, 1967

In this letter Al Hearin expresses his admiration for Dr. King and his character, but also expresses his concerns that he, Dr. King, is possibly being used by communist elements in society. Hearin also requests that Dr. King write him a handwritten letter about a life changing experience. Furthermore, Hearin requests an autographed picture.

Letter from Marshall C. Dendy to the SCLC

Monday, October 23, 1967

In this document dated 10/23/1967, Marshall C. Dandy writes to Dr. King and the rest of the SCLC, enclosed is a check from "A Fellowship of Concern".

List of Messages to MLK

A list of messages including names, dates, and organizations intended for Dr. King, soliciting his response.

Great Neck Declaration of Rededication

The citizens of Great Neck, New York rededicate themselves to the "struggle for equality and justice."

William E. Channing

Dr. King references theologian William E. Channing regarding his views on "Unitarian Christianity."

Telegram to MLK from John Jacobs

John Jacobs accuses Dr. King of being associated with Communists. He proclaims that Negroes learned raping, robbing and relief with Dr. King's training.

George A. Chauncey request to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

George A. Chauncey writes Dr. King to request copies of the "Annual Report of the President," a speech that was delivered at the 1967 meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Telegram Text from MLK to USAG Robert Kennedy

Sunday, October 6, 1963

Dr. King requests that Attorney General Robert Kennedy intervene in New Orleans to prevent further intimidation of civil rights supporters by police.

Letter from Jack Stern to Romanelli Studios

Monday, May 17, 1965

Jack Stern discusses the details with Romanelli Studios regarding the portrait plaque of Dr. King.

Letter from Rose Auguste to MLK

Rose Auguste asks Dr. King for a list of publishers that are open to Negro work. She is looking for a publisher for her manuscript, which has a "spiritual and supernatural theme."

Letter from Bruce Macdonald to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

Brice Macdonald, a writer for Canada's national newspaper "The Globe and Mail," informs Dr. King that he will be travelling to the South to see how it is developing. Macdonald inquires if he can converse with Dr. King or any of his employees who are well informed on the situation in Southern regions.

Telegram from Uppsala Student to MLK

Monday, November 9, 1964

Student organizations in Sweden invite Dr. King to Uppsala during his visit to Scandinavia.

The Dexter Echo: Not Guilty!

Wednesday, June 8, 1960

This article states that Dr. King was found not guilty for tax evasion charges. The state's tax agent refused to lie under oath or allow prejudice to sway the facts.

Letter from Roslyn Wilkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Roslyn Wilkins of California asks Dr. King for his opinion on interracial marriage. Wilkins asserts that her mother would rather her marry a Japanese man because, as Wilkins is white, they are closer in color.

Letter from John Lewis to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

John Lewis thanks the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Board of Directors for their five thousand dollar contribution to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

March on Washington

Sunday, April 28, 1963

In this news release, Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, addresses Congress to voice the people's concern in their quest for freedom, jobs and equal rights. He commends Republicans and Democrats in support of legislation to end discrimination.

Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change

The conference on "Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change" at Howard University contains various speakers deriving from various academic disciplines. Dr. King participated in the lecture and discussed how nonviolent methods impacted individuals, especially the youth.

Telegram from Prentiss Childs to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Prentiss Childs, producer of the CBS news program "Face the Nation," invites Rev. Abernathy to speak on the conflict in Vietnam.

A Promising Day for the City of Selma

In this handwritten public statement, the author addresses the Negro citizens of Selma, Alabama by commending their efforts of non-violence during a one-thousand person demonstration for equal voting rights.

King Made Tactical Error In Choosing Slums as Issue

Thursday, March 3, 1966

This article addresses Mr. Jay McMullen's issue with Dr. King's "trusteeship" or "personal war" with Chicago slums serving as the focal point of his Chicago crusade. According to Mr. McMullen this approach showed not only the lack of diplomacy by Dr. King and his staff, but also proved that in fact their approach may be ten years too late.

Letter from Stewart Udall to MLK

Secretary Udall grants permission to the SCLC to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation at the Lincoln Memorial.

Telegram from Mrs. King on Meaning of Christmas

Thursday, December 19, 1968

Mrs. King expresses sadness that the United States is launching a new dimension in its space program, but spends so little on eliminating poverty, hunger, disease, war and racism.

New York Welfare Organizers to Join Poor People's Campaign

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Susan Oreskes, a welfare organizer in New York City, informs Dr. King that 2000 people demonstrated as part of Dr. Spock’s peace campaign. She and Beulah Sanders, Citywide Coordinator of Welfare Groups, took 4 busses from the Upper West Side to George Wiley’s Poverty Rights Convention in Washington in August where they met with Senator Jacob Javits about a guaranteed minimum income. Mrs. Oreskes also states she wants to work with Dr. King and includes addresses for Beulah Sanders and Arnaldo Barrow of the Puerto Rican Community Project.

SCLC Newsletter, July-August 1964

Wednesday, July 15, 1964

This 1964 SCLC newsletter addresses nearly all if not all topics related to the Civil Rights Movement of the era.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King references theological literature regarding the development of Christianity.

Request from Wm. James Stuart to MLK

Monday, June 14, 1965

Wm. James Stuart, a student, seeks the recommendation of books that helped Dr. King develop his own way of preaching.

Statement Issued from Harlem Hospital by MLK

Tuesday, September 30, 1958

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the staff at Harlem Hospital and those who supported him during his stay at this location. He asserts that the telegrams, letters, calls and other means of contact have been accepted as a token of respect.

The State of SANE

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

H. Stuart Hughes, Chairman of the National Committee for a SANE Nuclear Policy, writes this report to the board, sponsors and chapters of the organization. Hughes notifies his readers that SANE's policy making body is being renewed due to newly elected regional and national members. Also, the Board adopted a detailed statement of a strategy, which places top priority on promoting an alternative to President Johnson and his Vietnam War policy. Other events include the update of a successful Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace and guest speaker Norman Thomas.

Letter from Victoria Bellard to MLK

Sunday, May 6, 1962

Bellard invites Dr. King to speak on behalf of voting rights and awareness. The event will host members of The Cordelia Green Johnson Beauty Forum. This displays the level of concern at the grassroots.