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Outline of Our God is Able

Dr. King outlines his sermon, "Our God is Able." He plans to explain the good and evil in humanity and ensures his audience that through all, "Our God is Able."

Letter from David Kairys to MLK and SCLC

Saturday, June 17, 1967

Mr. Kairys writes Dr. King to express his support of Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam War as well as Dr. King's approach to civil rights issues.

Letter from UN Ambassador Adlai Stevenson to MLK

Monday, January 18, 1965

Adlai Stevenson, US Ambassador to the United Nations, thanks Dr. King for a previous letter and for Dr. King's attendance at a reception at the United States Mission. Stevenson also congratulates Dr. King on his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

Telegram from MLK to the Honorable Carl Sanders

Dr. King invites the Honorable Carl Sanders to share the pulpit with himself and Mayor Ivan Allen at the Annual Layman's Day celebration at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He also invites him to a dinner to honor Governor Nelson Rockefeller at the home of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Letter from Ms. Dorothy Clark to Rev. Abernathy

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this letter accompanying a contribution, Ms. Clark expresses her condolences after Dr. King's assassination and pledges her personal support in continuing his mission.

Materialism

Dr. King documents a quote by Robert Flint, a Scottish theologian and philosopher in reference to "materialism" from the "Baird Lectures."

Letter from MLK to Louis Pollak

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Dr. King writes a recommendation letter for Alan B. Watchel to Dean Louis Pollak of Yale Law School. Dr. King highlights the contributions that Mr. Watchel has made to support the struggle for human dignity and equality.

Edwin B. Allaire's Letter to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Mr. Allaire informs Dr. King that there are many individuals who would vigorously support him in becoming a presidential candidate.

Letter from Adlai E. Stevenson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

US Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai Stevenson, informs Dr. King that they will have to postpone their meeting due to a U.N. Security Council meeting that Mr. Stevenson has to preside over.

Why We Can't Wait Title

This document is a portion of a newspaper that contains the title "Why We Cant Wait" by Martin Luther King Jr.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1967

In this document, Dr. King receives a royalty check from J. Campe for the use of A Stone of Hope in a work entitled "This Nation." The amount of the check is 13.50.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to MLK

Monday, November 22, 1965

Carey McWilliams, Editor of "The Nation," reminds Dr. King that it is nearly time to publish his annual article. McWilliams also requests that the timing of the article correspond with the beginning of the new session of Congress.

Letter From Dora McDonald to Rev. Albert F. Campbell

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Secretary McDonald writes Rev. Campbell on Dr. King's behalf, informing him of that Dr. King will consider his invitation to the next Men's and Women's Day celebration.

Letter from S. W. Molodtsov to MLK

Thursday, January 19, 1967

The International Institute for Peace sends this letter to Dr. King on behalf of the World Council of Peace. A recent meeting undertook "a major step towards the international coordination of activities to end the war in Vietnam," and the meeting resulted the decision to host an international peace conference. Dr. King is invited to participate in the conference. The Council expresses that his presence and contribution would greatly enhance the conference's impact on anti-Vietnam efforts.

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding a Japanese Edition

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, requests permission from Dr. King to proceed with the Japanese edition of his book "Strength to Love" per the terms outlined in her letter of April 13.

Rules of Procedure

Tuesday, April 19, 1955

The National Council of the Churches of Christ is a unified body of Christian faith groups. Presented here is an organized contract outlining the official rules of procedure for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes from D. Miall Edwards’ “The Philosophy of Religion.” Miall is misspelled on the note card.

Letter from Eugene G. Huston to Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Mr. Huston writes to request that the photos of Mrs. King and her daughter which appear on the cover of Life Magazine, April 1968 be widely distributed. Huston believes that if this is done the larger public will be just as moved as he was and further serve to promote the memory of Dr. King.

President Kennedy's Record

Friday, February 9, 1962

In this February 1962 column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King acknowledges President Kennedy's appointment of Negroes and executive order ending employment discrimination. But he calls the President “cautious and defensive” in providing strong leadership in civil rights and criticizes him for not ordering an end to discrimination in federally-assisted housing.

Letter from George W. Baker to MLK

George W. Baker encloses a check in support of Dr. King and his ongoing work towards peace in Vietnam.

Letter from June Alder to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966

Mrs. Alder expresses her support and concern regarding integrated housing.

Metaphysic[s]

Dr. King quotes William James’ “The Sentiment of Rationality” on Arthur Schopenhauer’s view of metaphysics.

Telegram from Mrs. King on Meaning of Christmas

Thursday, December 19, 1968

Mrs. King expresses sadness that the United States is launching a new dimension in its space program, but spends so little on eliminating poverty, hunger, disease, war and racism.

MLK Announcement of Rally to be held in San Francisco

Dr. King announces the details for a rally in San Francisco, California to garner support for the pending Civil Rights Bill in Congress. He makes a call to action for various diverse groups to join in this initiative.

Letter from Arthur James to MLK

Arthur James, a member of the Movement for the Advancement of Black Brotherhood and Culture, invites Dr. King to speak at Lincoln University.

Telegram from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

The registrar at Newcastle University thanks Dora McDonald for communicating Dr. King's additional engagement commitments to help in their planning.

Addition to "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence"

This augmentation was intended to be included in Dr. King's "Pilgrimage to Nonviolence" essay published in the Christian Century on April 13, 1960. In the appendage, Dr. King discusses the personal afflictions he has endured as a result of his civil rights work including death threats, bombings of his home, and a near fatal stabbing. He states that suffering has a "redemptive quality" and discusses how he transformed his personal suffering into a "creative force" instead of reacting with bitterness.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Leon R. Martin

Monday, August 12, 1963

SCLC Director of Research and Information Harry Boyte communicates with Leon Martin to thank him for the thoughtful words made in response to Dr. King's article in "The New Leader." Boyte tells Martin that Negroes in America are at a place where they will no longer be forced to wait for equality. Boyte asserts that only the complete participation of Negroes in every part of life in America will "suffice at this juncture in history."

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

Tidewater Youth Association Invites MLK to Speak

Saturday, March 30, 1963

Edwin Crocker, president of the Tidewater Youth Association, Inc. in Portsmouth, Virginia informs Dr. King of an interest to present him as their forum speaker. A student initiative, the organization strives to improve social, economic, and spiritual conditions of the Negro. The group hopes Dr. King will consider helping the youth fight for racial justice and equality.