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Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Negro Population

This document compares the number of Negro registered voters and the potential number of registered Negro voters to the Negro population in the Southern United States.

SCLC Staff Assignments

This document contains a list of specific assignments for the individuals of the SCLC staff.

A. Philip Randolph Institute Orientation Agenda

This document outlines the schedule of events during the A. Philip Randolph Institute orientation, an organization focused on racial equality and economic justice.

Telegram Request to MLK on the Kennedy Assassination

Thursday, December 5, 1963

This Western Union Telegram was sent to Dr. King from Tokyo, requesting commentary concerning John F. Kennedy's assassination for the magazine Midorikawa.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dora McDonald regarding copies of books that she requested Dr. King to autograph for the libraries of Mr. Enoch and Mr. Weybright. She asks Dora about their whereabouts and adds a request for Dr. King to autograph a copy for herself.

The Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Storthing

Thursday, January 30, 1964

The members of the Swedish Parliament honors Dr. King for the Nobel Peace Prize Award. The Parliament expounds on the prosperous and revolutionary efforts of Dr. King and encourages him to continue the methodology of nonviolence introduced by Mahatma Gandhi. Dr. King is further highlighted for his works in the United States and his contributions to eradicate racial discrimination.

Letter from MLK to Fellowship Baptist Church

Friday, May 5, 1967

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude for the contribution made by the Fellowship Baptist Church in Chicago, Illinois to the SCLC while explaining what the contribution is envisioned to accomplish and what the SCLC has already accomplished.

TV Guide Requests Article on TV's Contributions to Civil Rights

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

TV Guide, in a letter signed by editor Merrill Panitt dated April 11, 1967, invites Dr. King to write an article of 1500 to 2000 words on the positive role television has played in fostering better relations between the races. The previous year, the magazine published a series on television?s impact on society that was largely negative. A proposed series for the 1967-1968 television season would recognize some of the good things television has accomplished. Dr. King is offered $1000 for the article.

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

Letter of Support from James Duren to MLK

Thursday, July 21, 1966

James Duren informs Dr. King that he was impressed by his speech at the Chicago Rally and requests a copy. He closes the letter with an inquiry about SCLC activity in Milwaukee.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

MLK Statement in Support of Labor Union

Thursday, June 11, 1959

This 1959 statement on behalf of the United Packing House Workers Union is one of many Dr. King wrote supporting unions and the Labor Movement.

Letter from T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Friday, January 20, 1967

T. K. Mahadevan, of the Gandhi Peace Foundation in New Delhi, India, refers to potential meetings with Dr. King and his colleagues.

Support Correspondence from Harold Ford to MLK

Sunday, September 3, 1967

In this letter, Harold Ford stresses the importance of the movement and the need for more privileged whites to lend a helping hand. He states that everyone has a moral responsibility to ensure the welfare of man kind and no one should haphazardly turn a blind to the issues of race and economics.

Letter from MLK to Ellis Pinkston

Friday, January 19, 1968

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Mrs. Ellis Pinkston for her support. He also extends gratitude on behalf of Mrs. King.

Letter from Glenn T. Izutsu to MLK

Friday, November 6, 1964

Mr. Izutsu, President of the Associated Students of the University of Hawaii, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize and recalls a visit by Dr. King earlier in the year.

Letter from William Eerdmans, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, June 15, 1963

William. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company requests to reprint Dr. King's "Letter From Birmingham Jail" in a small booklet for wider circulation. Eerdmans, Jr. writes, "your words...are those of a Christian martyr and saint."

Letter from Harris Wofford to MLK and Ralph Abernathy

Saturday, November 30, 1957

Harris Wofford, civil rights supporter and friend of Dr. King, proposes "the right next step" for King and the Montgomery Improvement Association. He suggests round-table conferences composed of white and Negro ministers, an idea inspired by the efforts of Gandhi.

Letter from C. L. Evans to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967

C. L. Evans is giving a $100 contribution on behalf of the Baptist Allied Headquarters, to Dr. King for his work and organization.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Dora McDonald updates Dr. King regarding the numerous letters, invitations, phone calls and other pending business matters while he has been away from the office. During this period of absence, Dr. King had been imprisoned and was now recovering at home.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa writes an uplifting message to General Yakubu Gowon of Lagos, Nigeria. They extend a "hand in friendship" to bring the war in Nigeria to an end.

SCLC's Eighth Annual Convention Resolution

Friday, October 2, 1964

This SCLC Resolution for the 8th Annual Convention, outlines the plan to encourage churchmen across the country to vote in the light of religious faith and conviction.

Letter from William Ferguson to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963

William Ferguson of Prairie View, Texas extends an invitation for Dr. King to address the community. The community of Prairie View is engaged in a multiracial boycott with the aid of many white ministers. They seek Dr. King's appearance to give vitality to their movement.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to commend him for his courage and work in directing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through Congress.

MLK Press Conference and Speech Notes

Dr. King stresses that his appearance to Cleveland is not in the interest of the candidates but to urge the people to exercise their political and moral responsibility.

Letter from Pastor R. L. Crady to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965

Pastor Crady expresses concern to Dr. King that the civil rights movement mayl be in vain, because segregationist organizations can use the umbrella of religious protection, along with taxpayer funds, to back up their convictions.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding German Re-Publicaition

Monday, May 11, 1964

In this letter Daves informs Dr. King of what Mr. Von Wehrenalp, Dr. King's German publisher, might have had in mind for Dr. King's special introduction for the German edition. Ms. Daves further discusses other possible uses for such a piece.

The Voter Registration Project of Winston-Salem Presents MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

This program details the schedule and many sponsors of a Voter Registration Project event in North Carolina, in which Dr. King was the keynote speaker.

Letter from Miss Susan Frehse to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1960

Miss Frehse expresses her feelings about Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom,"and how it was hard to convince her classmates of the degree to which the white people in Alabama went to rob Negroes of their rights. She also asks Dr. King to send any available information that will help her classmates understand the reality of racism in the South.