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Letter from James Hamilton and Frank Pohlhaus

Friday, March 31, 1967

James Hamilton and Francis Pohlhaus offer the Leadership Conference Executive Committee a list of recommendations on school desegregation. They also provide information on reasons why goals toward equal education have not been progressing as needed.

Letter from Henry L. Gerner to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Henry Gerner applauds Dr. King on his accomplishments and what he is doing for the Civil Rights Movement. He also invites Dr. King to speak at Bowling Green State University, a request that is echoed in a letter from Donald Stricker.

Request from Virgil Jones to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Virgil Jones requests photocopies of letters sent to him on Nov. 9, 1967, as well as some other materials.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding the "Times"

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, provided a detailed advertisement schedule for his latest book "Why We Can't Wait." Advertisements appeared in the Times, Harper, The Atlantic, Christian Herald and the Christian Century to name a few.

When Peace Becomes Obnoxious

This 1956 newspaper column is a re-print of a sermon delivered by Dr. King on segregation and events in Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Philip Lubliner

Wednesday, August 23, 1961

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Lubliner's support during the "freedom struggle in the South."

Letter from Clyde Rembert to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967

Clyde Rembert, a broadcaster from KRLD-Radio and KRLD-TV, writes Dr. King inviting him to the radio show. Rembert seeks a response from Dr. King regarding a derogatory statement made by Dr. Criswell concerning King's anti-Vietnam war stance.

Review on "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

The Virginia Kirkus Review wrote this descriptive review on Dr. King's final book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? The context of the review shows differences between the messages of Dr. King's earlier works and Where Do We Go From Here. Dr. King's earlier publications focused on the work of gaining decent treatment and basic civil rights for black Americans. However, this book heavily challenged the status quo in America.

Letter from Leroy Johnson to MLK

State Senator Leroy R. Johnson forwards a Senate Pass to Dr. King, and informs him of an open invitation to visit the Senate at his leisure.

Birthday Card from The Men's Usher Board to MLK

Friday, January 1, 1965

The Men's Usher Board of Ebenezer Baptist Church wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.

The Montgomery Bus Boycott Story

Monday, December 31, 1956

This dramatic story gives a riveting account of the Montgomery Bus Boycott movement and its aim to end segregation of the public transit in Montgomery, Alabama after the arrest of Rosa Parks. E.D. Nixon and other ministers illustrate the philosophy of nonviolent tactics employed by the Montgomery Improvement Association and their struggle for "cosmic companionship."

Dr. King Plans '67 Pilgrimage to Holy Land

This newspaper clipping outlines plans for Dr. King's Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK and Others

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Mr. Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other members of the ANLCA's call committee of vaccinations required when traveling internationally.

Review of "Why We Can't Wait"

A preview of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appearing in TIPS, highlights specific reasons why the American Negro is so unwilling to accept the system of gradualism as a way of obtaining his rights.

Van Til, Cornelius

Dr. King cites Cornelius Van Til's "The New Modernism."

Telegram from Ebenezer Baptist Church to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Ebenezer Baptist Church offers support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from Virginia M. Burke & Phyllis M. Banks to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963

Virginia Burke and Phyllis Banks express their interest in distributing "The Negro Is Your Brother", better known as "Letter from Birmingham Jail", to Wisconsin leaders to inform them of the goals and aspirations of Dr. King and his following. Burke and Banks explain that while the document had appeared in multiple publications, they feel that it has yet to reach the wide audience it deserves. They ask Dr. King's permission to reprint and distribute the document if he holds the copyright.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Rubio

In this letter, Dr. King attempts to guide Dr. Rubio to resources that will be helpful in his new endeavors.

The Advances of Operation Breadbasket

Monday, December 5, 1966

This document displays two articles that report on the progress made by "Operation Breadbasket" in Chicago. The first article discusses SCLC's negotiations with High-Low Foods, a Chicago chain that agreed to implement business practices that would serve "Negro-owned" businesses in the community and increase black employment in the company. The second article highlights similar negotiations carried out with National Tea Co., another Chicago based business. Civil Rights leaders Jesse Jackson and Rev.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Tuesday, January 1, 1974

This document is regarding the celebration of the Birthday Anniversary of the late Dr. King. The author states, "While the national holiday legislation is pending in Congress, masses of people everywhere already personally declare the date to be their own to honor one of history's greatest leaders."

Telegram from Thich Nhat Hanh to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Thich Nhat Hanh informs Dr. King that he will be in Atlanta from February 24th to February 29th.


Dr. King quotes from Browning's "A Death in the Desert."

The Sentinel: Sweetheart's Korner

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Hattie Bea Carney expresses her views and feelings on the moral trend of young people. Throughout the article, Ms. Carney offers alternative, as well as, parental advice for Christian parents.

Letter from T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Friday, January 20, 1967

T. K. Mahadevan, of the Gandhi Peace Foundation in New Delhi, India, refers to potential meetings with Dr. King and his colleagues.

Howard University Request of Dr. King

Saturday, March 11, 1967

Lewis Fenderson is extending the deadline for the essays requested of Dr. King. He makes the suggestion that if time is a factor, several excerpts from him would be more than welcomed.

Letter from MLK to Linda Houser

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King writes this letter to Linda Houser of Ursulin Academy regarding the studies that cultivated her involvement in the "struggle for social justice in America."

Telegram from R. T. Blackwell to MLK

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

R. T. Blackwell informs Dr. King that he will be unable to attend an upcoming board meeting due to issues with a farmers cooperative proposal and a funding crisis.

Sermon Outline Notes - MLK

This document is an outline handwritten by Dr. King, who frequently wrote such outlines as a precursor to a sermon. The topic centers on man's talent and his reasons for using--or more importantly, not using--that talent.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

The Casualties of The War In Vietnam

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Dr. King speaks on behalf of the United States presence in Vietnam at a symposium held in Los Angeles, California. He addresses the moral, social, and political causalities that arise as result of war. Moreover, he urges the powers that be to allocate resources for good and rather than evil.