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"SYRIA"

Who Are We?

Saturday, February 5, 1966

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

Bloody Sunday

Dr. King recollects events that occurred on "Bloody Sunday" in Selma, Alabama as 525 blacks marching were tear-gassed, clubbed, and beaten by police officers and discusses how television helped the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts that the television helps us all be participants in vital matters and it adds trust and validity to the movement.

Which Way for the Negro Now?

Monday, May 15, 1967

In his thirteenth civil rights cover story, Newsweek General Editor Peter Goldman reports on a movement in crisis, with fragmented leadership, impatient black followers, and increasingly alienated white supporters. Goldman and reporters interviewed top leadership ranging from the Urban League’s Whitney Young to black power advocate Stokely Carmichael. This article asks what will become of the Negro Revolution.

Invitation Program to the 1966 Upper Room Citation

The following document is an invitation program from the Rev. Dr. Manning and the Upper Room inviting guests to attend the 1966 Upper Room Citation at the Grand Ballroom, London Hilton Hotel in London, England.

Letter from Nels F. S. Ferre to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Dr. Ferre commends Dr. King on writing "Where Do We Go From Here?" He also expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his position of leadership and for including him in the author's list.

Invitation to Harry Belafonte Concert

Friday, May 25, 1962

Dr. King invites friends to a Harry Belafonte concert, which is a benefit performance for the SCLC.

Letter from Dieter Pichowski to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Mr. Pichowski, from East Germany, is in request of Dr. King's handwriting.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967

Co-Chairman Julian Bond welcomes Dr. King and other members of the SCLC to the National Conference for New Politics. Bond also comments on past civil rights victories, and he mentions future organizational directions.

Ethics

Dr. King writes on the topic "ethics," according to Proverbs 6: 17-19.

Revelation Baptist Church Program for "A Knock at Midnight"

Sunday, September 27, 1964

This program outlines the Revelation Baptist Church Sunday Worship Service on September 27, 1964. The booklet lists Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth, co-founder of the SCLC, as the church's presiding minister. On this occasion, Dr. King addressed the congregation from the pulpit with the sermon "A Knock at Midnight," which had been published the year before. Dr. King's handwritten notes seem to outline another talk on the back cover.

Western Union Telegram from Albert Shanker to MLK

Mr. Shanker, President United Federation of Teachers AFL-CIO, thanks Dr. King for his support during a teachers' strike.

Letter from MLK to Nathaniel Barber

Friday, July 23, 1965

Dr. King thanks Nathaniel Barber for his contribution to the SCLC and gives a brief overview of the work done by the organization.

Letter from Mildred Maroney to MLK about a Donation

Thursday, May 11, 1967

In this letter Mildred Maroney of the Brookings Institute forwards a donation which was an honorarium due to Mr. Robinson Hollister. This was done because Mr. Hollister requested that the honorarium be donated to the SCLC on his behalf.

Letter from Ronald H. Lind to MLK

Thursday, March 9, 1967

Reverend Ronald Lind writes to Dr. King, urging him to take a positive stand on the integrity of Representative Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter Regarding MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

This letter from Dad to Frank and Mark commends Dr. Kings use of the 'march' as means to secure a better life for the Negro. The author goes on to say the integration benefits both the Negro and whites in the supply and demand of labor.

People in Action: A Look To 1964

Saturday, January 4, 1964

Dr. King writes this article looking forward to the new year of 1964. He notes that all the activity and accomplishments in 1963 set the tone for what is to come in the following year. Though "the Negro as a community has increased his skills tremendously in quantity and quality," there is still much work to be done. King references the civil rights legislation that currently stands before Congress. Among other topics, he also states that there are efforts to broaden the power of the Negro consumer market.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to John H. Bustamente

Thursday, December 28, 1967

Chauncey Eskridge elaborates on the financial details associated with the Belafonte Benefit Concerts. He also requests some help in overcoming the deficit created by the concert.

Letter from Eugene Wolfe to MLK

Eugene Wolfe, Executive Director of the Council for Civic Unity, forwards Dr. King a check for SCLC from various religious and civic organizations in San Francisco.

Letter from Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti to MLK

Friday, June 25, 1965

The Indian organization, Sarvajanik Kalyan Samiti, expresses admiration of Dr. King's heroic struggle for civil rights in the US, along with his application of Mahatma Gandhi's methods. A bronze bust of Gandhi is offered as a gift of appreciation and a request made for placement of the statue in a children's park.

Letter from Cryssana Jenkins Bogner to MLK

Monday, June 19, 1967

Mrs. Cryssana Jenkins Bogner writes Dr. King with to both support his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, and to share her discontent with Executive Director of the NAACP Roy Wilkin's stance on the Vietnam War.

Vietnam and Beyond

This program for the Ecumenical and Community Conference held at the Thornfield Conference Center in Cazenovia, New York, highlights leaders from across the globe invited to attend the conference. These leaders were invited to support the efforts in Vietnam and assess policies regarding the country.

Letter from Eleanor S. Greve to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Eleanor Greve writes Dr. King to express the encouragement and inspiration she and her husband felt while reading a portion of Dr. King's speech in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The speech was given before the Chicago Area Committee for a Sane Nuclear policy.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

Telegram from N. K. Steele to MLK

N. K. Steele, on behalf of Bethel Baptist Church, offers prayers to Dr. King during his stay in the Care County Jail in Americus, Georgia.

Letter from Harriet Meyers to Benjamin Nelson

Thursday, December 15, 1966

Ms. Meyers writes to Judge Nelson dissatisfied with the way he conducts trials, especially in her situation of a malpractice suit. She requests plastic surgery to correct the erroneous surgery.

Letter from Adlai E. Stevenson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

US Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai Stevenson, informs Dr. King that they will have to postpone their meeting due to a U.N. Security Council meeting that Mr. Stevenson has to preside over.

Letter from the Mississippi Club to MLK

Monday, January 14, 1963

Officials of the Mississippi Club make a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and offer a prayer for Dr. King.

Letter from Samuel McKinney to MLK

Monday, June 20, 1966

Reverend McKinney, of the Mt. Zion Baptist Church, informs Dr. King he is unable to participate in the Mississippi Freedom March. A check from the Mt. Zion congregation is enclosed to assist with registering voters.

Invitation from Harry Wachtel to the Members of the Research Committee

Monday, February 26, 1968

Harry Watchel writes to the members of the research community to inivite theim to participate in a meeting called by Dr. King.

Letter from Berry Gordy to Reverend Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, July 18, 1963

Mr. Gordy writes to Mr. Walker to negotiate album production and royalty rates for Dr. King's speeches.