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Letter from MLK to Mr. C.G. Christian

Wednesday, August 22, 1962
Birmingham, AL

Dr. King sends this letter of recommendation, on behalf of Reverend John Thomas Porter, to the Pulpit Committee of Sixth Avenue Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Following the death of Dr. Goodgame, Dr. King nominates without reservation, Reverend Porter who he calls, "one of the finest men on the ministerial horizon."

Supralapsarianism

Dr. King provides a definition of the term supralapsarianism.

Letter from Bertha Baker to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Pennsylvania (PA)

Bertha Baker requests Dr. King's assistance regarding discrimination issues involving employment, private industry, housing and education. Mrs. Baker details inequalities in numerical form and concludes with a request to join Dr. King's organization.

Letter from SCLC to Lizzie Williams

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
Selma, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

A representative of the Citizenship Education Program, an initiative of the SCLC, informs Mrs. Willis of recent travel plans to Dorchester, GA. Dorchester academy played a vital role in the struggle for voting and civil rights.

The Evening Star: The Perversion of a Cause

Monday, March 13, 1967
New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

This article describes the effect of James Meredith's withdrawal from the race for Adam Powell's congressional seat. Civil Rights activists such as Dr. King, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. McKissick offer their opinions on how the race was handled.

Anonymous Letter to Ralph Abernathy

Reverend Ralph Abernathy received this brief correspondence from an individual asking about a King James Bible. The note advises Reverend Abernathy to read Matthew 26:11.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Eugene Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addresses multiple issues that were misunderstood. He then encourages Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions and informs him that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. James Bevel

Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Washington (WA)

Dr. King informs Rev. Bevel of an urgent meeting with the Action Committee for Washington Mobilization at Paschal's Motel.

Letter from Cryssana Jenkins Bogner to MLK

Monday, June 19, 1967
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. Cryssana Jenkins Bogner writes Dr. King with to both support his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, and to share her discontent with Executive Director of the NAACP Roy Wilkin's stance on the Vietnam War.

Freedom and Destiny

Dr. King discusses the topics of freedom and destiny as it relates to man.

Newspaper Article about Refresher Training and Employment for Teachers Displaced by Integration

Washington, D.C.

This newspaper article frames the dilemma of teachers displaced by integration. Secretary of Labor W. Willard Wirtz urged state employment agencies to make a maximum effort to provide employment assistance and refresher training opportunities for these teachers.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968
Atlanta, GA

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter from William Woodall to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Mr. Woodall relays instructions from God concerning Dr. King's next march.

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965
New York, NY

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Telegram from Richard C. Gilman to Dora McDonald

Saturday, November 12, 1966
Los Angeles, CA

Richard C. Gilman sends this telegram to Dora McDonald confirming Dr. King's speaking engagement at Occidental College.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion."

Postcard from Westmont College Library to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967
California (CA)

The library at Westmont College thanks Dr. King for sending pamphlets and other literature about the SCLC.

An Order For the Baptism of Adults

Dr. King outlines the order of the baptism service, including specific phrases for the minister to use.

Letter from MLK to Henry Luce of Time Magazine

Thursday, January 16, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Henry Luce of Time magazine for naming him "Man of the Year." However, Dr. King believes that this honor is shared among the millions of individuals who committed themselves to the struggle for civil rights. Dr. King also acknowledges Luce for publishing the accomplishments of Negro professionals.

Note from Will Dale to MLK

MEXICO, KENYA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Will Dale writes Dr. King commending him for encouraging Black athletes to boycott the Olympic games.

Telegram from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, September 13, 1967
Atlanta, GA, UNITED KINGDOM

The registrar at Newcastle University thanks Dora McDonald for communicating Dr. King's additional engagement commitments to help in their planning.

The American Dream Outline

Philadelphia, PA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King outlines his "American Dream" speech on the back of letterhead from the Bellevue Stafford hotel. Dr. King writes about a "massive action program" to address injustice in America.

Letter from Abby Seldes to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C.

Young Abby Seldes writes Dr. King to inform him of how inspirational his words are. Seldes mentions that she is a 12-years-old from Pennsylvania and an avid supporter of Dr. King's leadership. She also discusses her parents' participation in the March on Washington.

Go to Black Africa

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

An unknown author writes to Dr. King advising that he return to Africa if he is unhappy with his plight in America.

Paul Tillich

Dr. King references the theologian, Paul Tillich, by asserting, "If philosophy of religion does not consider the revelation claim of religion, it misses its object and doesn't deal with real religion."

Western Union Telegram from Barrington Dunbar to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY)

In this telegram, Barrington Dunbar of the peace and social committee from New York, informs Dr. King of the support from his religious society.

Minutes for the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

The minutes for this meeting include the Civil Rights act of 1967, the "Freedom Budget," and discrimination in military off-post housing.

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

Tuesday, September 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.

Carlisle's Variety Shop Souvenir Booklet

Birmingham, AL

Carlisle Variety Shop produced this souvenir booklet advertising Negro businesses but also honoring Dr. King and other SCLC officials involved in the 1963 Birmingham campaign.

The Modern Negro Activist

Montgomery, AL, GHANA, NIGERIA, KENYA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Alabama (AL), California (CA), Cambridge, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.