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Telegram from Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons to MLK

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons conveys his support to Dr. King for a statewide Mississippi boycott. Gibbons congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Cass Canfield to Joan Daves

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Cass Canfield from Harper & Row, Publishers thanks Joan Daves for sending the outline of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here." Cass suggests that in the book Dr. King "should stress that the Negro problem is part of the poverty problem."

The Man Who Was a Fool

The sermon "The Man Who Was a Fool," was published in the June 1961 issue of the journal The Pulpit. Dr. King delivered the sermon in both Chicago and Detroit in early 1961.

An Open Letter to Congress from John H. Murphy III

Thursday, November 9, 1967

John H. Murphy III, president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, urges Congress to pass the Anti-poverty Bill, because voting down the bill would be "cruel and inhumane."

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Friday, December 3, 1965

Vice President Humphrey thanks Dr. King for participating in a recent White House Conference, "To Fulfill These Rights," which focused on jobs, jobs training and economic security.

Telegram from Irving Block to MLK

Sunday, January 28, 1968

Rabbi Irving J. Block of the Brotherhood Synagogue in New York requests to meet with Dr. King regarding the Negro Jewish community.

Awake America

A poem by Jerry Peace calls for Americans to wake up and address current world issues.

Letter from Lillian Mirvus to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

Lillian Mirvis writes to Dr. King regarding his invitation to Walter P. Reuther to speak at the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter From Dora McDonald to Rev. Albert F. Campbell

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Secretary McDonald writes Rev. Campbell on Dr. King's behalf, informing him of that Dr. King will consider his invitation to the next Men's and Women's Day celebration.

1963 World Day of Prayer

Friday, March 5, 1965

This brochure from the United Church Women of Atlanta, sent to Ms. Coretta Scott King, outlines the agenda for 1965 World Day of Prayer. The brochure allso included is a schedule of the organization's calendar of events.

Moral and Religious Imperatives for Brotherhood

Saturday, February 9, 1963

Dr. King shares how important it is for America to obtain racial integration.

Letter from John Maguire to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Mr. Maguire writes Ms. McDonald requesting a full text copy of Dr. King's speech on "Viet Nam" in New York.

The Dan Smoot Report: Communism in the Civil Rights Movement

Monday, June 1, 1964

This issue of the Dan Smoot Report explores communism in the Civil Rights Movement. He shows how Dr. King and his secretary, Bayard Rustin, are Communist personalities involved in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Joan Daves to Ms. Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 16, 1964

Joan Daves tells Dora McDonald that she had tentatively spoken to Dr. King about accepting the invitation to speak at The University Settlement award ceremony. She asks Ms. McDonald if she would keep the date for the engagement should he be able to attend. Daves also requests a copy of Dr. King's itinerary.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Philip Hiat

Friday, February 8, 1963

Dr. King responds to Rabbi Hiat's suggestion to provide an "opportunity for dialogue between Jewish and Negro religious leadership." In addition to confirming his participation in the dialogue, Dr. King commits to sending an additional letter with the names of "men who have much to contribute" along with some potential subject headings for the agenda.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding British Edition of Book

Thursday, May 11, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves relays details regarding the British edition of "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?" to Dr. King.

Letter from Aguedo Mojica Marrero to MLK

Friday, March 10, 1967

Tthe Vice President of the Puerto Rican House of Representatives requests copies of the speech given by Dr. King to the Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam.

We are Still Walking

Saturday, December 1, 1956

Dr. King describes how African Americans reacted to the Klan's plan to intimidate them after the decision of the Supreme Court. Although deeply involved in the bus protest, Dr. King stated that there were other goals to achieve such as establishing a bank and credit union in Montgomery for African Americans.

Trent, Canons and Decrees of the Council of

Dr. King records some thoughts on the Decrees of the Council of Trent regarding the Catholic Church's response to the Protestant Reformation.

Letter from Congressman James Roosevelt to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Representative James Roosevelt thanks Dr. King for his words regarding Roosevelt's contribution to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Dick Thorp

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Dick Thorp, the Choice '68 coordinator for Andrews University, writes seeking a political platform and general campaign material to aid the student association in preparation for the Choice '68 primary sponsored by Time magazine.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

Letter from Juanita Epps to MLK

Tuesday, March 23, 1965

Juanita Epps sends Dr. King a check on behalf of the People's Community Church of Queens, New York. Epps acknowledges that their church doesn't have a huge congregation but they wanted to make their contribution towards justice and equality.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

SCLC Duties

This document outlines general responsibilities and specific duties of SCLC officers. Top level members listed include Dr. King, President, Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to President, Andrew Young, Program Director, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, Office Manager and Educational Consultant, and Ralph Abernathy, Financial Secretary-Treasurer. The document states that Dr. King's general responsibility as President is to "coordinate and interpret the total program of SCLC."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris write Dr. King expressing their appreciation for his role as a Civil Rights leader. They were moved to write to him after hearing him speak at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee and request to meet with him the next time he visits.

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

Tuesday, December 17, 1963

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

Anonymous Letter to President Johnson

The anonymous sender of this letter urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to take action to fund programs in order to get people in school or at work in order to quell rising tensions in cities filled with people dissatisfied with their social and economic positions.

Letter from Paul Yelter to MLK

Monday, December 11, 1967

Signed by twenty-one supporters, this letter requests that Dr. King make a public statement about his disapproval of the 1968 Olympic Boycott by American Negro athletes. The authors argue that the boycott will ruin a chance for Negro athletes to prove their equality to white athletes.

Mail and Messages Note to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

This is a list of mail and messages for Dr. King dated 12/12/67. It includes a letter from his literary agent Joan Daves about a speech to be given at the University of Kansas, a publication from the Southern Regional Council, and phone calls about speaking engagements and media inquiries.