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Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Program

This document details an amended budget for the SCLC's Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee.

SCLC Annual Report by MLK, 1965

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

Dr King delivered this report at the SCLC's ninth annual national convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Serving essentially as a State of the Union address for the SCLC, the report touches on the major topics of the Civil Rights Movement and the recent achievements and goals of the SCLC.

Atlanta SCLC Prexy Jailed in Albany

During a prayer pilgrimage in Albany, Georgia Rev. John A. Middleton, Pastor of Atlanta's Allen Temple A. M. E. Church, and 75 other religious leaders were jailed.

Letter from Charlie Cheese Carsons to Rev. Andrew Young

Friday, July 22, 1966

Charlie Cheese Carsons addresses Rev. Andrew Young to provide him with a painting that expresses the Civil Rights Movement and the fight for human dignity. Mr. Carsons is aware that Dr. King's attention has more important concerns which explains his reasoning for contacting Rev. Young. In addition to the painting, Mr. Carsons attaches his perceptions of prominent African Americans who served as his inspiration.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968

An anonymous supporter sends an encouraging letter to Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Rev. A. D. Evans

Tuesday, July 20, 1965

Dr. King writes Rev. A. D. Evans and friends of St. Paul A.M.E. Church to thank them for their financial contribution of $500 to the SCLC. He discusses the current efforts of the organization such as Operation Breadbasket and the citizenship schools. Dr. King explains their monthly budget and the importance of supporters.

Letter from Nigerian Man to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

An affectionate admirer writes Dr. King to express his plans to take up studies in aeromechanics at a vocational school in the United States. The Nigerian native requests sponsorship from the Reverend and his organization to assist in this attempt.

A Letter Enclosing an Address by George B. Nesbitt

Thursday, August 3, 1967

In an address at the CME Church Conference, George B. Nesbitt analyzes the role of the church during the Civil Rights Movement. During slavery, the church was a place of refuge and hope, but now individuals are beginning to lose their faith in the church.

Letter from Corinne B. Hill and Harold Stassen to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 12, 1967

Harold Stassen correspond with Dora McDonald expressing gratitude for a letter sent a few days earlier. The letter involves a book to be written by Dr. King.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Saturday, April 29, 1967

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Man: Origin, Limitations and Freedom

Dr. King quotes Bible passages that explore the value of man, the limitations of man, the relationship between soul and body, and the origin of man.

Letter from Dale Rickmon to Rev. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

This letter of condolence is addressed to the Reverend Abernathy as the succeeding head of the SCLC. It accompanies a memorial poem written in dedication to Dr. King.

Fifty-five Facts about Morehouse

This pamphlet discusses fifty-five important facts about Morehouse College and its distinguished alumni.

No, Mr. King: Your Ad in the Times is Not Clear!

This anonymous author writes Dr. King expressing dissent in his viewpoint on riots.

Autograph Request

Friday, August 19, 1966

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

Letter from US Soldiers Lester Hill, James Gardner and Homer Collier to MLK

Friday, October 15, 1965

Three Negro soldiers communicate with Dr. King regarding the racial practices of white GIs against fellow Negro GIs. The soldiers feel pressure to not only fight against the enemy but to watch over their shoulders to shield themselves from intimidation against the white GIs. Lester Hill writes on behalf of soldiers requesting Dr. King's help.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Frank Kuhlman about Support

In this letter Dr. King expresses his belated gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kuhlman for their letter of support. Dr. King also comments on nonviolence and the war in Vietnam.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Mr. Brookshire explains to Dr. King the application of the U.S. Constitution to underprivileged groups and urges him to avoid matters of war and peace.

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Pamphlet

This pamphlet promotes the historic March on Washington of August 28, 1963. The pamphlet calls upon Congress to pass civil rights legislation and end the "twin evils of discrimination and economic deprivation" that plague the nation.

Statement by MLK on Segregation

Thursday, July 11, 1963

In this statement from Dr. King on segregation, he argues that it is "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Letter from MLK to Jimmy Edward

Monday, September 14, 1964

Dr. King acknowledges receipt of Mr. Jimmy Edwards' letter with the kind words concerning his book, "Strength To Love."

Telegram from American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa to President Johnson

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Members of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa express their disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and ask for U.S. intervention.

Letter of Support from Mr. Watts to MLK

This letter from W. Douglass Watts, a student, extends his support and best wishes to Dr. King for his upcoming birthday.

Letter from Mrs. William P. Camp to MLK

Thursday, October 28, 1965

Mrs. Camp expresses her gratitude for Dr. King's participation in the Fiftieth Anniversary Celebration ceremonies for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. Mrs. Camp requests permission to reproduce excerpts from his speech for use in publication of the organization.


Dr. King discusses the relationship between God and humanist thinking.

Birmingham Desegregation Settlement Agreement

Friday, May 10, 1963

Dr. King reviews the settlement made between the City of Birmingham and civil rights protesters. This agreement includes the integration of lunch counters, sitting rooms, restrooms, and water fountains within ninety days.

Statement of Congressman Seymour Halpern in the House Debate on the Voting Rights Bill

Mr. Halpern addresses the Chairman of the House of Representatives in favor of passing the Voting Rights Bill. He wants to ensure that the bill is enacted in a way that will not allow it to be manipulated by individual states, causing further discrimination against African Americans and non-English speakers. Mr. Halpern goes on to explain other acts that must take place and suggests other tenants to be incorporated into the bill in order to make sure all Americans have equal rights under the law.

John of Damascus

This notecard contains historical information regarding John of Damascus and outlines some principles of his religious philosophy.

Letter from Gordon Allott to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Gordon Alliot, a member of the United States Senate, sends his appreciation to Dr. King for his endorsement for a position on the "historic civil rights bill."