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Adverse Letter to MLK

The author of this letter negatively expresses his opinion for Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

Letter from MLK and Associates to Mr. Grover Hall

Friday, January 11, 1957
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King and associates write to Grover Hall, Editor of the Montgomery Advertiser, to express appreciation for an article the publication carried. The clergymen state that "law and order can be restored" if other periodicals throughout the South follow the newspaper's example.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC)

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Letter from T. Spurgeon Bell to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967
California (CA), Kentucky (KY)

T. Spurgeon Bell writes Dr. King to voice his concerns regarding the Civil rights movement. In his opinion the Civil Rights bill is not beneficial to the changes Dr. King seeks. He believes that such bills cannot change varying opinions on other races and asks Dr. King to alter his attempt at social change.

Revelation

Dr. King quotes Emil Brunner's "The Mediator."

Letter from C. Sumner Stone Jr. to Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, August 8, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

"Washington Afro-American" Editor Chuck Stone forwards Rev. Wyatt Walker the resumes of individuals that might be suitable to work as a public relations specialist for the SCLC. He urges that Walker and Dr. King carefully examine the resumes and respond to "the more outstanding candidates."

Letter from John L. Gregory to MLK

Tuesday, November 19, 1963
Vermont (VT), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

John L. Gregory informs Dr. King about the check dedicated to the SCLC. The Vermont Church Council is concerned with the Civil Rights Movement and contributes to Dr. King's organization to be an asset to the improvement of the American society.

Holiday Card from Julius and Gloria

This holiday card was sent in good wishes for the recipient from a Julius and Gloria.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer blames Dr. King for riots and turmoil taking place in America.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1963

Friday, March 1, 1963
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), New York (NY), Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, Atlanta, GA

SCLC highlights its affiliate activities, fundraisers and efforts to rebuild burned churches in this newsletter from March of 1963. One of the cover stories focuses on the repeal of segregation laws in Albany, Georgia. The "Profile of the Month" article features Milton A. Reid and discusses his contributions to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mildred R. Morris

Monday, August 19, 1963
Cincinnati, OH

Dora McDonald responds to Mildred R. Morris on behalf of Dr. King, who will take into consideration her offer after meeting with the Executive Staff of SCLC.

Vietnam and the Conscience of U.S.A.

Monday, May 1, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, Denver, CO, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

The author argues that the U.S. is fighting a false bogey of international communism in Vietnam at the expense of Great Society programs at home.

Letter from Joan Daves to Jose Moya about Spanish edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Friday, August 7, 1964
SPAIN, PORTUGAL

Here Joan Daves specifies the particulars of negotiations in advances and royalties on the sale of the Spanish edition of "Why We Can't Wait".

SCLC-CCCO Chicago Freedom Festival

Chicago, IL

The Chicago Freedom Festival was designed to raise funds to end slums and segregation in Chicago. The festival will feature an address by Dr. King and an all-star show.

Discrimination Is a World Wide Issue

INDIA, New York, NY

Dr. King delivers this address speaking to humanity's failure to offset discrimination. He believes the United States, with all its technological and democratic advances, could stand to learn from the social morality of India, which is considered a "less developed nation." Dr.

Letter from William Connor to MLK

Saturday, August 12, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

William Connor encourages Dr. King to continue his efforts to speak the truth and practice Christianity. He emphasizes that there is no need to ignore the important issues of our time. Connor states, "Now, we've either got to put up, or shut up-as the saying goes."

Stanford University Faculty and Staff Pledge of Civil Disobedience

Friday, May 26, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

The Faculty and Staff members of Stanford University make a pledge of civil disobedience to protest the Vietnam conflict. The individuals signing the pledge request members of the clergy and academic community with like sentiments to join them in this demonstration.

Letter from Lewis J. Stemn to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
Chicago, IL

Writing from Monrovia, Liberia, Lewis J. Stemn shares his belief that one should adapt the idea to "love thy neighbor as thyself" to all facets of life.

Letter from Joseph W. Williams to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Detroit, MI, South Africa

Joseph W. Williams congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Memorial Service Flyer - Robert F. Kennedy

Robert F. Kennedy, Attorney General of the United States offered extemporaneous remarks on the death of Dr. King. He wrote, "What we need in the United States...is love and wisdom and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice toward those who still suffer within our own country, whether they be white or they be black."

Letter from Ruth Frank Rosenwald to MLK

Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), GERMANY, VIETNAM

Ruth Frank Rosenwald writes urging Dr. King to commend Robert Kennedy for his advocacy of peaceful alternatives to war and to invite him to issue a joint call for a meeting of civil rights and peace leaders and President Johnson for dialogue on U.S policy in Vietnam, Santo Domingo and West Germany.

Angeology

Dr. King cites the reference in Isaiah 6:2 to a seraphim, likely "a winged human figure."

Enclosure to MLK - A Call for a National Fast by CALCAV

This is an enclosure that accompanied a letter dated March 22, 1968 from John C. Bennett to Dr. King. Dr. King spoke often of the need of fasting to repent for the sin of Vietnam, and was closely associated with the Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam (CALCAV). Between the writing of this letter and the event itself, Dr. King would be assassinated.

Letter from the National Committee To Combat Nazism to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Chicago, IL, Louisville, KY

Rabbi S. Burr Yampol, Chairman of the National Committee to Combat Nazism, sends Dr. King a resolution on civil rights that was passed at their fourth annual conference in Chicago. The resolution formally announces the organization's support of the Civil Rights Movement.

William E. Channing

Baltimore, MD

Dr. King references theologian William E. Channing regarding his views on "Unitarian Christianity."

Letter from MLK to Catriona Cole White

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Connecticut (CT)

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Catriona Cole White to thank her for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. He explains that their recent projects have included voter registration in the south.

Note Card from H. Plant

H. Plant expresses his approval for the Civil Rights Movement, but also shares his frustration with the implication that all whites carry the blame for the current situation.

Memo to SCLC Contributors

Louisville, KY, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), Indiana (IN)

This memo from the SCLC Staff highlights political activity taking place in Louisville, Kentucky, Blue Ridge, Georgia, and Cleveland, Ohio. The organization had used the energy from demonstrations to fuel voter registration campaigns. They share stories of collaborations and success that have resulted from their efforts.

Sabellianism

Dr. King defines "Sabellianism" as the concept of acknowledging God as one entity with three modes.