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"San Francisco, CA"

Letter from George Overton to MLK

Wednesday, August 4, 1954
Connecticut (CT)

George Overton sends Dora McDonald a letter thanking her for the calendar of Dr. King's family. He also requests some photographs and expresses his support of Dr. King.

Letter from the Unitarian Church of Germantown to MLK

Friday, February 23, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Unitarian Church of Germantown requests Dr. King's presence during the Pulpit Schedule for 1962-1963. The organization is aware of Dr. King's endless schedule and provides him with a honorarium if he were to accept this invitation.

Letter from Mount Olivet Tabernacle Baptist Church to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

Pastor Marshall L. Shepard invites Dr. King to the Dedication Service for the Mount Olivet Village Corporation in Philadelphia.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967
New York (NY), INDIA, ITALY, UNITED KINGDOM

Rodney Clurman, of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, outlines Dr. King's itinerary for a global trip that includes meeting with officials from Scotland, the Pope in Rome, and travelling to New Delhi.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Louisiana (LA), Atlanta, GA

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King in response to a telegram sent by the Reverend protesting action be taken by the State of Louisiana against the Southern Conference Educational Fund.

Letter from Andrew Hobart to MLK

Tuesday, November 29, 1966
Minnesota (MN)

In this letter, dated 11/29/66, Mr. Andrew Hobart, President of Ministers Life and Casualty Union informs Dr. King that his application for reinstatement has been accepted, and cautions a lapsed contract may result in a loss or reduction of benefits.

Letter from Mrs. R. K. Matthews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter is from a middle class housewife who expressed her despair and frustration to Mrs. King in learning of Dr. King's assassination.

Civil Rights Symposium Program

Thursday, April 8, 1965
Cleveland, OH

This document is a program from a symposium workshop on national and local civil rights challenges.

Letter from MLK to Katharine Hightower

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this letter, Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at a community event hosted by the Saint James African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Letter from MLK to Vance Hartke Regarding Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Vance Hartke's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from T. Watson Street to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965
Tennessee (TN), BRAZIL

After being informed of Dr. King's visit to Brazil in the summer of 1965, T. Watson Street invites him to a meeting of Presbyterian churches sponsored by the Division of Overseas Ministries of the National Council of Churches of Christ in America or the Evangelical Federation of Brazil.

Letter from Charles E. Rogers to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Charles Rogers writes Dr. King expressing his grief because of King's recent "allegiance to the communist cause in Southeast Asia." Rogers states that because of Dr. King's speech, his fame will face a decline and people will ask, "who is Martin Luther King?"

Invitation from the Negro American Labor Council to MLK

Wednesday, December 8, 1965
Wisconsin (WI), Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

On behalf of the Negro American Labor Council, August Hill invites Dr. King to visit Racine, Wisconsin. He tells Dr. King that they are suffering from problems regarding employment in addition to all of the other inequalities. He also says that their community is not involved and that they need to be concerned about the issues in their society.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. William Lawson

Wednesday, May 6, 1964
Texas (TX)

Dora McDonald writes in response to a request from Reverend William Lawson of Texas Southern University. McDonald encloses a biographical sketch and photograph of Dr. King, then relays a message from the Reverend to exclude a reception for him on May 17.

People In Action: Literacy Bill Dies

Saturday, May 26, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King shares his disappointment with the Senate vote that stopped the 1962 Voting Rights Bill, then known as the Literacy Bill. The bill would have eliminated the literacy tests that Dr. King believed were used to keep African-Americans of all education levels from qualifying to vote.

Man the Sinner

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from Thomas H. Uzzell

Monday, July 16, 1962
Oklahoma (OK)

Thomas Uzzell asks Dr. King to read his book entitled, "The Twilight of Self-Government." Mr. Uzzell's book deals with the racial crisis in America and how it "can be solved in a democratic manner."

Homeric Problem

Dr. King briefly outlines the problem surrounding the work of the Greek poet Homer. The note card references the view of German scholar and critic Friedrich August Wolf and documents two primary theories regarding Homeric literature.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to Reverend Allen L. Johnson

Monday, April 12, 1965
Jackson, MS, Chicago, IL

Chauncey Eskridge informs Reverend Johnson that he has sought information from Jack H. Young and R. Jess Brown regarding the posting of bond money.

Letter from Samuel F. Daly to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967
Virginia (VA), Birmingham, AL

The author suggests Dr. King reclaim his leadership of the civil rights movement from Stokely Carmichael and Rap Brown.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

Saturday, May 6, 1967
VIETNAM, ISRAEL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., EGYPT, GERMANY, UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE, CUBA

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Letter from Louis Lurie to Dizzy Gllespie

Monday, October 14, 1963
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA

San Francisco philanthropist and real estate developer Louis Lurie forwards a donation for the SCLC to famous trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. Gillespie often performed at fundraising concerts for the SCLC.

Higher Education Opportunities for Southern Negroes

Sunday, January 1, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, Boston, MA, Virginia (VA), Texas (TX), Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN)

The Southern Education Foundation provides a detailed list of references concerning various opportunities, organizations and procedures related to higher education. This pamphlet was strategically designed to assist organizations and community leaders seeking to improve educational opportunities for students of color.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Charles Digioia

Monday, October 24, 1966
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King expresses his sincere gratitude for the sculpture of John Henry that was created and sent to him by Mr. & Mrs. Digioia. As intended by the artist, the art work embodies the magnificence of strength and courage held with in the oppressed. Honored to accept it, Dr. King sees John Henry as an inspirational symbol of will and spirit.

Letter from E. Z. Graves to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Florida (FL)

E. Z. Graves adversely compares Dr. King, Stokely Carmicheal and Adam Clayton Powell to manure. Mr. Graves attaches an article entitled, "King and Carmicheal Maps Strategy for Summer Attacks on Big Cities."

Telegram from Operation Breadbasket Leaders to Ivan Allen

Tuesday, November 14, 1967
Atlanta, GA

This telegram originates from leaders of the Atlanta chapter of Operation Breadbasket and urges the Mayor to take action on employment opportunities for African-Americans.

Letter from Miss Margaret Scattergood to MLK

Wednesday, January 8, 1964
DENMARK, NORWAY, SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA)

Ms. Scattergood writes to Dr. King on behalf of Dr. Peter Manniche concerning a proposition to visit Scandinavia and address citizens of Europe. Dr. Manniche asserts "For there is an important service to be done in Europe...and you could contribute so much".

Letter from MLK to Mimi A. Edwards

Tuesday, December 4, 1962
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King responds to the letter of Mimi Edwards, as student at Elizabeth City Teachers College in North Carolina. He stresses the impact that a nonviolent movement can have on the South, the nation, and the world. He also enclosed copies of two articles to assist Miss Edwards with a paper she is writing.

Reader Strikes Parallel Between America, Nazis

VIETNAM, Illinois (IL)

This document contains two letters to the editor of an unknown newspaper. The first letter is written by Edwin Johnson. He criticizes the war in Vietnam, making comparisons between the Nazis and the American military. E.D., the author of the second letter, also criticizes the war, calling for an end to the violence in Vietnam.

Letter from Sheldon L. Gutman to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
United Nations, Columbia Broadcasting System, inc., Southern Christian Leadership Conference, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Arizona (AZ), FRANCE, AUSTRALIA, CANADA, United Nations, Columbia Broadcasting System, inc., Southern Christian Leadership Conference, CHINA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CONGO / ZAIRE, Arizona (AZ), FRANCE, AUSTRALIA, CANADA, THAILAND, SOUTH KOREA, NORTH KOREA, JAPAN, GREECE, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C., CYPRUS

Sheldon L. Gutman writes Dr. King urging him to utilize his prominence by consistently speaking out about the issues of the world. Gutman also expresses concern regarding America's potential retaliation to China detonating a hydrogen bomb.