Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Selma, AL"

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles H. Smith

Tuesday, January 30, 1962

Dr. King regrettably informs Rev. Charles Smith that he will not be unable to make an appearance at the First Baptist Church in West Virginia. Due to Dr. King's schedule and commitments to his home church, he finds it difficult to accept any invitations for the next several months.

Letter from Everett C. McKeage to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Mr. McKeage writes to Dr. King expressing his satisfaction and appreciation for his position on Vietnam relations. He encloses a monetary donation to assist Dr. King's work.

Letter from Grenville Clark to Dr. King Regarding the N.A.A.C.P Legal Defense Fund

Thursday, July 28, 1966

In this letter, Grenville Clark provides details about his involvement with the N.A.A.C.P Legal Defense Fund, which he believes the kind of work it is doing must be constantly supplemented by the mass non-violence direct action.

King's Way Hurts Rights Movement

Mr. White, author of this article, argues that the political fallout from Dr. King's stance on America's involvement in Vietnam hinders the goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Images from a Shot Sheet by Victor Summa

This piece vividly describes a poet's conception of an urban "Negro" scene. The poetic imagery paints a picture of a dilapidated neighborhood occupied by impoverished, helpless neighbors and drunkards who undergo tremendous emotional struggle. Dr. King's handwriting at the top of the poem indicates that he wanted this document filed.

Letter from Carol Thomas to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Carol Thomas writes Dr. King to inform him that she is making a donation to help with the war on poverty. Enclosed with the letter is a $125.00 check. She also explains that she received one of King's books in the mail. Ms. Thomas further inquires of the purchasing and mailing information of books made to the public.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King writes about Bernard of Clairvaux and his idea of the character of the ideal Christian.

Letter from James Godfrey to MLK

Monday, July 29, 1963

Mr. Godfrey invites Dr. King to speak at the Radio Music Hall in Washington D.C. for a fundraising event on behalf of the NAACP.

Letter from John Conyers to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964

John Conyers, Congressman-Elect for the first district of Michigan, writes Dr. King seeking advice and endorsement for his campaign.

Letter from Dave G. Pettigrew to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Dave Pettigrew, the Campus Coordinator for Choice '68 at the University of South Florida, invites Dr. King or "any of his representatives" to speak to the University. If someone is able to attend, Pettigrew requests information on their candidate and their potential responses to the three referendum questions listed.

Letter of Response from Clarence B. Jones to J. Saba Alexander

Wednesday, April 17, 1968

Clarence Jones responds to Alexander's letter requesting action steps to create an interfaith chapel and memorial library in honor of Dr. King. Jones agrees with the great loss and likewise pledges to continue the work.

Letter from Mrs. Charles Wilkinson to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Fund Committee of Aurora, Illinois sends $1,020 to help provide food, clothing and medicine for needy citizens in Selma, Alabama.

Letter from Leonard Dorsey to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Leonard Dorsey requests Dr. King begin teaching the subject of Divine Retribution.

Statement by MLK Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

After being notified of receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King released this statement to the public.He refers to the award not as an honor but as a "tribute to the discipline."

Letter from MLK to Katherine Gunning

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Katharine Gunning for sending him a copy of the letter she sent to President Johnson. He urges that "those of us who seek peaece through non-violence make our consciences and numbers known to the men who run our government."

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Letter from Dr. King to the Media Seeking Support for Negroes Living in Chicago

support from white media outlets to help fight for freedom of the average black citizen in chicago
ernie banks, billy williams, don bufords and floyd robinson

Telegram from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Dr. King offers words of encouragement to Adam Clayton Powell during the loss of his seat and chairmanship in Congress.

Messianic Age

Dr. King reviews a bible verse that discusses the rule of the Messiah.

Letter from Harry Daniels to MLK

Saturday, March 29, 1969

Harry Daniels stresses the urgency of an American withdrawal from Asia and proposes appointing Dr. King as special ambassador to North Vietnam.

Letter from Eugene Wolfe to MLK

Eugene Wolfe, Executive Director of the Council for Civic Unity, forwards Dr. King a check for SCLC from various religious and civic organizations in San Francisco.

Letter from Ernst Ketel to MLK

Ernst Ketel writes Dr. King expressing disgust with current political parties and ideals. He requests that Dr. King consider running for political office, preferably president.

Holiday Card from the King Family

This is a holiday card from the King Family.

Letter From Joseph Livingston to MLK Regarding Receipt of Letter

Saturday, December 2, 1967

Here Joseph Livingston beckons Dr. King to confirm receipt of a letter sent in reference to what he describes as "a matter of Life and Death".

Letter from Ms. Dorothy Clark to Rev. Abernathy

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this letter accompanying a contribution, Ms. Clark expresses her condolences after Dr. King's assassination and pledges her personal support in continuing his mission.

Descartes

Dr. King references a theological concept by the French philosopher Rene Descartes.

Letter from Nathan Green to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Here, Nathan Green requests to meet with Rev. Abernathy to discuss a plan that Green believes will be of "tremendous value" to their cause.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."

Letter from MLK to Claes Collenberg

Monday, April 25, 1966

Dr. King expresses his sincere appreciation to Claes Collenberg of Sweden for his help in raising money to assist with the civil rights movement in America. He conveys to Mr. Collenberg that he will be notified of updates involving the Chicago Campaign on housing.

MLK Announces End of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Thursday, December 20, 1956

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, issued this statement following the US Supreme Court’s decision declaring laws requiring segregation on busses unconstitutional. He announces that the year-long bus boycott is officially over and urges Negroes to return to the buses the next morning on a non-segregated basis. Negroes need to adopt a spirit of understanding toward their white brothers, he says. It is time to move from protest to reconciliation.