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"Selma, AL"

Letter from Louise Andrews Sims to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Louise Andrews Sims asks Dr. King to consider providing assistance to the American Friend's Service Committee by setting aside one week for aspeaking engagement in October or November of 1963. Alternate dates could be in January through April of 1964.

Letter from James Hamilton and Frank Pohlhaus

Friday, March 31, 1967
Georgia (GA)

James Hamilton and Francis Pohlhaus offer the Leadership Conference Executive Committee a list of recommendations on school desegregation. They also provide information on reasons why goals toward equal education have not been progressing as needed.

War (Just War)

Dr. King cites Francisco Suarez's definition of a "just war" from his "Tractibus de. Legibus."

Lorene Doss Request for MLK Assistance with a Class Project

Monday, February 19, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Lorene Doss, a high school senior at Sadie V. Thompson, requests the assistance of Dr. King on a project for her government class. The topic of her project is "What are the Main Causes of Poverty".

Letter from Ronald F. Jockers and Ronald Schlossman to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Ronald Jockers and Ronald Schlossman write Dr. King inviting him to participate in the National Collegiate Presidential Primary Choice of 1968.

Telegram to W. L. James from Dr. and Ms. King

Monday, January 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King write Mrs. James expressing condolences following the death of her husband. Dr. James was a music educator at Spelman College and a 1923 graduate of Morehouse College . He served as Chairman of the Music Department at Spelman and Director of the Glee Club from 1933 to 1966. Dr. James died December 27, 1966.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

Tuesday, October 16, 1956
New York (NY)

In this early speech to a NY Universalists' convention, Dr. King lays out his nonviolence method, based on Gandhi's. He outlines five of the six principles he will use later. They are: active, courageous resistance; winning the moral conversion of the opponent, not defeating him; attacking the forces of evil, rather than the persons doing evil; using love to avoid "internal violence of the spirit"; and faith in the inclination of the universe towards justice.

"Harlem Wants To Know"

New York (NY)

In this document, residents of Harlem question the trial in the murder of Malcom X.

Note Card from H. Plant

H. Plant expresses his approval for the Civil Rights Movement, but also shares his frustration with the implication that all whites carry the blame for the current situation.

Telegram to Alan Reitman from MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King informs Alan Reitman of the American Civil Liberties Union that he will sign a statement opposing the House Un-American Activities Committee and the Senate Internal Securities Committee.

Congratulatory Letter from L.K. Jackson to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Indiana (IN)

In this letter, Dr. Johnson writes to Dr. King congratulating him on his tenth anniversary. Jackson states, "...you are the man of the Twentieth Century."

Letter from Minnie Summers Lindsey to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
California (CA), Birmingham, AL

Mrs. Lindsey asks Dr. King for a copy of a speech she recently heard on the radio and his "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from John H. Sengstacke to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1957
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Mr. Sengstacke informs Dr. King that he will be presented with the Certificate of Award in honor of his selection to the 1956 Chicago Defender Honor Roll.

Letter from Marian Hargrave to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Ms. Hargrave offers her support for Dr. King and his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. She also discusses the religious aspects of the struggle, which she feels give it a deeper meaning.

Press Release on Voter Registration

Monday, October 12, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

The purpose of this press release is to announce Dr. King's nationwide campaign to get individuals to vote in the 1964 presidential election. With sponsorship from the SCLC, Dr. King urges religious leaders to talk to their respective congregations to encourage voter registration. Rev. Walter Fauntroy, who pastored the New Bethel Baptist Church in Washington D.C., will lead the initiative.

Letter from MLK to Audrey Mizer

Friday, December 29, 1961
Ohio (OH), CHINA

Dr. King addresses Audrey Mizer's concerns regarding his position on "admitting Red China to the United Nations." He explains that he realizes the sensitivity of this topic but feels that the issue must be tackled in a realistic manner.

Letter from MLK to Robert Epstein

Thursday, November 15, 1962
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a letter from Robert Epstein regarding the objective of SCLC. King states, "No man can comment adequately on his own motives... I would hope agape is the driving force in our movement." Dr. King encloses a pamphlet entitled "This is SCLC."

The New York Times: Books of The Times Storm Warnings

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

Eliot Fremont-Smith examines Dr. King's stance on the term of Black Power, his views on political power for Negroes and his focus on nonviolence.

Letter from R. Abraham to MLK

Saturday, September 20, 1958
New York, NY

R. Abraham sends this get-well letter to Dr. King wishing a full recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital. Also enclosed is a gift in appreciation for Dr. King's work for humanity.

Letter from Howard Frazier to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Virginia (VA), VIETNAM

Mr. Frazier thanks Dr. King for his "courageous" stand on the Vietnam War. He is impressed by Dr. King's plan to organize thousands of volunteers to participate in the Peace Movement and makes a donation of $25.00 to the peace fund.

CORE List of Cities Where Lunch Counters Have Opened Since February 1st, 1960

Monday, February 20, 1961
Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Kentucky (KY), West Virginia (WV), Oklahoma (OK), North Carolina (NC), Missouri (MO), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), Texas (TX), Maryland (MD)

This document is a list of locations where lunch counter sit-ins have occurred, provided by the Congress of Racial Equality

SCLC Meeting Agenda

Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King notes agenda items to cover with the SCLC staff, including improving organization within the SCLC, finances and upcoming programs.

MLK Lauds Roy Wilkins for His Work with the NAACP

Wednesday, January 3, 1962
Atlanta, GA, GEORGIA

Dr. King honors Roy Wilkins for not only his efforts in the NAACP, but also his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Monday, December 30, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C.

The Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg invites Dr. King to speak at meeting that will be held at the Pennsylvania State Educational Building. Martin Morand, Vice-President of the Council, also includes information about the issues in Harrisburg's black community to show why Dr. King should accept the invitation.

Letter from Alex Miselson to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Alex Miselson suggests that Dr. King, the SCLC, and other leading civil rights group make the education of African American youth a priority.

Letter from Noel N. Marder to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Noel N. Marder, manager of the Negro Heritage Library, encloses a silver certificate from a coin shop to attempt to amuse Dr. King. Mr. Marder also hopes to connect with Dr. King to discuss his thoughts regarding the new plans that are in a stage of creation.

Letter from Sympathizer to MLK

Writing under a pseudonym, the author suggests that the world is separate because that is the way that God intended it to be. The author pulls text from the Bible to support this idea. The author believes that society was equal with the separation and there is no need for Dr. King to continue his fight.

Letter of Gratitude from MLK to Mrs. Erber

This letter of gratitude was written to Mrs. Erber from Dr. King. In this letter Dr. King thanks Mrs. Erber for forwarding the newspaper clippings about her daughter Elena. Little Elena is a supporter against the injustices of racism. Dr. King thanks her for raising such an admirable daughter.

Letter to MLK from Angry Citizen of Detroit

Friday, July 14, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

A bothered citizen of Detroit writes Dr. King, who is referred to as the "negro champion," to express personal views on the status of the Negroes in the city.

Letter from Shinichi Oshima to MLK

Tokyo, Japan, JAPAN

Fifteen year old Shinichi Oshima of Japan, writes Dr. King expressing his admiration and appreciation for the movement and the black man. He also discusses his religious views and his desire to help black men in Africa.