The Archive

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"Selma, AL"

Letter from Beryl Arensberg to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Beryl Arensberg writes Dr. King asking him to consider a strategy that emphasizes a collective mourning for all those impacted by the Vietnam War. He believes such a course of action will inspire direct impact in several admirable ways.


Dr. King defines latitudinarianism, a term "applied to a liberal opinion which allows the diversity of opinion."

Miss Mahalia Jackson in Concert

Sunday, December 1, 1963

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference presents Miss Mahalia Jackson in concert, marking "another milestone in her personal dedication to the drive for complete freedom for all humanity."

Letter from Katherine Kasper to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Katherine Kasper, a Chicago collegiate junior, requests the political opinions of Dr. King in anticipation of the 1968 Presidential Elections.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Mr. Exman writes to Dr. King to inform him that the Religious Book Club has chosen "Strength to Love" as a selection. Exman adds that 9,000 advance copies will be published despite concerns about the book's reception in the south.

Letter from MLK to Jacob Nolde

Dr. King discusses with Jacob Nolde the importance of nonviolent peace movements and the malady of the Vietnam War. He stresses that these nonviolent actions should be exercised internationally and America should cease its desire to maintain wide-spread military control.

Letter from Fred Roesti to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966

Fred Roesti writes Dr. King to arrange a meeting between him and five pre-theological students, to get his perspective on "the contemporary social situation and the 'relevance' of the church."

Letter from Time Magazine Publisher Bernhard Auer to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963

Bernhard Auer communicates his disappointment that Dr. King will be unavailable to attend the 40th Anniversary Dinner of Time Magazine.

Letter from Florence Read to MLK

Wednesday, May 5, 1965

Florence Read informs Dr. King that she received news of his Nobel Peace Prize while traveling in the Middle East. She encloses articles from The Jerusalem Times and The Daily Star of Beirut for Dr. King's records.

Elmer Evans Advocates for Black Power

Sunday, July 16, 1967

"A white caucasian" advocates for black power, claiming that it is synonymous with sovereign power. Responding to a televised discussion on the subject of black power, Elmer Evans aims to challenge what he felt was inaccurately presented on the show.

Letter from Macedonia Church to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968

Members of Macedonia Church seek advice and help from Dr. King in regards to continuing Sunday worship service.

Photograph of MLK

Guenther Jacobs from Germany sends Dr. King a photo for him to autograph.

Letter from MLK to Thomas J. Dodd

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Thomas J. Dodd's support in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Ben Baldwin to MLK about an Interview

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

In this letter Ben Baldwin of Ring Radio WRNG requests an interview with Dr. King to be part of an all talk radio show, which would open in Atlanta.

God is a Spirit

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "God Is A Spirit" and lists three different meanings for that assertion.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Stoug

Dr. King writes Mrs. Stoug thanking her for sending a copy of the play, "Listen America." He also offers advice on how to market her play and expresses his appreciation for her support for the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Norman Baugher, Galen Ogden and W. Harold Row to MLK

Monday, July 29, 1963

Prominent officials from the Church of the Brethren's Committee on Race Relations writes Dr. King informing him of the power of television in promoting nonviolence. Since many individuals around the nation are unfamiliar with the practices of nonviolence, Norman Baugher, Galen Oden and W. Harold Row recommend that Dr. King call upon various associates to appear on television and educate the public on the nonviolent philosophy.

Four Top Rights Leaders Considering Africa Trip

Monday, December 18, 1967

Roy Wilkins, Dr. King, Whitney Young, and A. Philip Randolph, four of America's top civil rights leaders, are considering making a trip to Africa to stop the war in Nigeria. These leaders also serve as members on the call committee of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964

Senator Brewster thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and encloses a copy of the speech he delivered on the Senate floor before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed.

Man (His Split Personality)

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Saturday, July 10, 1965

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. D. Bollinger

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Miss McDonald sends Dr. Bollinger an expense statement for Dr. King's appearance in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Mars Lecture Series

Tuesday, April 15, 1958

This 1958 program features Dr. King as guest lecturer for the Mars Lectures at Northwestern University.

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Letter from Claudia Grams to MLK

Friday, November 15, 1963

Claudia Grams, a junior at Central High School in La Crosse, Wisconsin, has chosen Dr. King for her junior exposition project and writes him requesting information on his earlier life. She expresses how Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom," has inspired her and she inquires about how her organization can support his movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Kates

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Ralph Kates on behalf of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit St. Joseph College.

Relation Between Eternal Objects and Actual Occasions

Philosophically rooted, the set of notes on this series of cards explores metaphysical claims for the understanding that each "eternal object" is necessarily connected to an "actual occasion." Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World" and speaks to the actualization of an event as result of possibilities.

Letter from Duane Brown to MLK

Duane Brown requests an autograph of Dr. King because of his appearance on the cover of Newsweek Magazine.

Ritschl, Albrecht

Dr. King provides a biographical sketch of German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

As Dr. King reflects on his acceptance of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, he draws a parallel to the American Negroes' nonviolent approach to civil rights and the people of India, Africa, and elsewhere throughout the world. King argues that "humanity's desperate need for peace and progress to move into the truly civilized world of the future" will ultimately derive from adherence to non-violence.