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"Selma, AL"

Telegram from Dr. Roland Smith to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Roland Smith congratulates Dr. King on being honored with a Doctor of Divinity Degree from Morehouse College.

Memorandum

Wednesday, September 7, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN), Little Rock, AR, Montgomery, AL, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New Orleans, LA, Texas (TX), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA)

This memorandum, sent to Dr. King, expresses the need for a convocation between Negro and white Southern leaders. Recent developments, such as peaceful integration of lunch counters and schools, show that whites are respecting equal rights of Negro citizens more.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

Nashville, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Telegram from MLK to Chauncey Eskridge

Saturday, May 12, 1962
Chicago, IL, New York, NY

Serving as the Honorary President, Dr. King invites Chauncey Eskridge to the Gandhi Society for Human Rights luncheon held in Washington, D.C., where he will be able to provide legal services to many southern Negroes in need.

Letter from George Graham to MLK

Thursday, September 1, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

Mr. Graham thanks Dr.King for replying to his letter, and expresses how much he enjoyed seeing him when he visited Raleigh.

Letter from C. B. Olmstead to MLK

Tuesday, July 13, 1965
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Olmstead writes that he is unable to reconcile Dr. King's support of civil disobedience with his plans for peaceful demonstrations. He contends the purpose of King's sustained agitation is to provoke violence. He feels the Civil Rights Act of 1964 should become the mechanism for opposing discrimination, not further boycotts and sit-ins.

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Sunday, September 18, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

Martin Luther King....At Communist Training School

Monday, June 17, 1963
Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Tennessee (TN)

This advertisement printed in the Augusta Courier accuses Dr. King and several constituents of communist involvement.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1959
Johannesburg, South Africa, South Africa, New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

Class Notes: Obadiah

Dr. King writes about the book of Obadiah and knowledge.

Letter from MLK to Reverend David A. Gibbons

Wednesday, June 19, 1963
Ohio (OH)

Dr. King writes this letter of appreciation to Reverend David A. Gibbons, Executive Secretary of the Denison Christian Association at Denison University. King is overjoyed to accept the $255 donation from several students and faculty members of the university. He explains the importance of the contribution and how it supports SCLC's voter registration work in Birmingham.

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Newsletter

Washington, D.C., California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Indiana (IN), Missouri (MO), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Minnesota (MN), Washington (WA), San Francisco, CA, VIETNAM, CUBA, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), Connecticut (CT), Massachusetts (MA), Ohio (OH), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This issue of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom newsletter, Four Lights, was sent to Coretta Scott King. It features an article about the current state of their demonstrations against Vietnam, including a quote by Dr. Benjamin Spock calling on President Johnson to end the attack on the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Frances H. Vicario

Monday, February 26, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mrs. Vicario and the Chemical Bank New York Trust Company for their generous contribution to the SCLC. He explains how the contribution will help in a time of need as the SCLC enters the critical phase of their ten-year ministry.

Letter from Edward F. Bell to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965
Detroit, MI, Montgomery, AL

Attorney Edward Bell offers his legal services to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the Civil Rights Movement.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Smith

Dr. King writes Mr. Smith thanking him for his contribution to the SCLC. He expresses that contributions help American Negroes to "continue in the struggle for freedom and equality."

Notes about Books

Dr. King opposes the existence of books that degrade the Negro image and falsely contribute to a "national brainwashing." He cites quotations from novelist John Steinbeck, which discourse on the "sacred" nature of a book.

Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 22, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, San Francisco, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

This letter informs fellow members of the Spring Mobilization to End the War in Vietnam of the successes of their organization and serves as a call to action on the upcoming steps.

A. N. Whitehead

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's view of the philosophy of science in The Concept of Nature.

International Issues: January 26, 1968

Friday, January 26, 1968
VIETNAM, Cleveland, OH, BELGIUM, New York, NY

This edition of the National Council of Churches "International Issues" features a report on the indictment of Dr. King's close associates and fellow peace activists Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr. and Dr. Benjamin Spock along with three other peace leaders. The indictment accuses the men of "conspiracy to counsel, aid and abet" draft evasion. The accused were charged on January 5, 1968, a few months after signing an open letter entitled "A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority," which was published in several newspapers.

Humanism

Dr. King discusses the weakness of "non theistic humanism."

Document Cover Page

Monday, January 15, 1968

This document, dated January 15, 1968, from Johnson Publishing Company is a cover page titled "For Dr. King."

Letter from MLK to Catriona Cole White

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Connecticut (CT)

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Catriona Cole White to thank her for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. He explains that their recent projects have included voter registration in the south.

SCLC Press Release About a Mississippi Political Rally

Thursday, February 8, 1962
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

This press release describes a political rally of Negro voters in Clarksdale, Mississippi at which Dr. King spoke. It declares the need for voter registration and the possibility for Mississippi to have as many as five African-American congressmen in Washington.

Open Letter from MLK to Negro Youth

Tuesday, September 6, 1966
Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL

In the wake of the urban uprisings of 1966, Dr. King writes an open letter to Negro youth empathizing with their desire to return to school and to find jobs. He mentions that he's written the President urging funding so all poor children can attend school and advocating implementation of a public works program to provide jobs for youth. He encourages young people to abstain from violence as ineffective in achieving their goals.

Letter from MLK to Richard C. Ernst

Wednesday, August 23, 1961
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, McComb, MS

Dr. King writes Richard Ernst and thanks him for his generous contribution which "has tangibly resolved a part of the difficulty we face in the legal defense of Rev. Abernathy." Dr. King highlights some the programs the SCLC has been able to implement due to contributions, such as the Citizenship School Training Center and voter registration drives.

Statement by MLK Regarding the Nobel Peace Prize

Wednesday, October 14, 1964
Atlanta, GA

After being notified of receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King released this statement to the public.He refers to the award not as an honor but as a "tribute to the discipline."

Letter from J. T. Brooks to Dr. and Mrs. MLK

Monday, November 16, 1953
Montgomery, AL, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL), Massachusetts (MA), North Carolina (NC)

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church representative J. T. Brooks conveys the church's interest in considering Dr. King for the pastorate.

Statement on Morality in Selma Crisis

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
Iowa (IA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, JAPAN

The undersigned individuals present at the Selma to Montgomery March write a statement regarding the conduct of participants. Accusations have been made stating marchers committed "acts of sexual immortality," which the undersigned aim to prove are absolutely untrue. Also included is a section on fiction and facts about the march, and a "Concluding Page Regarding Clergy for Alabama Truth."

Letter from Al Capp to MLK

Wednesday, May 27, 1964
New York (NY)

Al Capp refuses to donate to the SCLC because he feels that organizations like Dr. King's promote violence against White Americans.

Letter from Dorothy Height to Dr. and Mrs. King

Thursday, December 8, 1966
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Noted civil rights leader and women's activist Dorothy Height invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be special guests at the National Council of Negro Women's Life Membership Dinner. The event is also set to honor union leaders A. Philip Randolph, Walter Reuther and Mrs. Arthur Goldberg. Singer Lena Horne serves as a co-host to the dinner.