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"Selma, AL"

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Irv Kupcinet encloses a clipping on the Soldier Field Rally for Dr. King. Kupcinet closes by requesting the Reverend's appearance on his television show.

Student Permanent Record of Judith Ann Jones

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

The student permanent record of Judith Ann Jones lists her academic progress while attending Chowchilla Union High School in Fresno, California in 1965.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963

Assisrtant US Attorney General Burk Marshall informs Dr. King that the allegations of police misconduct in Danville, Virginia are being investigated by the Department of Justice and assures him that the appropriate actions will take place "with respect to any violations of federal law."

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to MLK

Friday, September 21, 1962

Eleanor Roosevelt invites Dr. King to appear in the first installment of a series of televised discussions entitled "The American Experience."

True Democracy

Reverend O. J. P. Wetklo explains his ideas of true democracy, which he gives a Christian foundation and compares to the natural world. He calls true democracy "a perfect brotherhood of man," and he argues that each individual member of society must take responsibility for the whole.

Letter to MLK from Cydrisse Crafton

In this document, Mr. Crafton writes to Dr. King advising not to participate in another "March". He asserts that "Negro's" are marching because they desire to live in a white neighborhood.

Proposed Nobel Speech

This is a draft for an optional version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. He notes the importance of viewing the world as a family and with such perception, understands race issues as an international concern. King also speaks of Sir Alfred Bernhard Nobel, the originator of the Nobel Peace Prize. He accepts the award on behalf of those who came before him and those who continue to fight for freedom.

Letter from Edwin Tuller to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Edwin Tuller, General Secretary of the American Baptist Convention, discusses an invitation for Dr. King to speak for the Buffalo Baptist Association. He suggests that Dr. King consider accepting the invitation because the association has good attendance from both Negroes and whites.

Telegram from Reverend Fred L Shuttlesworth to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy assures Dr. King that the nation extends their congratulations and prayer for his success. Reverend Abernathy asserts that as soldiers of freedom, they must "win this battle" for their country and that there "can be no retreat" in the movement.

Letter from William Connor to MLK

Saturday, August 12, 1967

William Connor encourages Dr. King to continue his efforts to speak the truth and practice Christianity. He emphasizes that there is no need to ignore the important issues of our time. Connor states, "Now, we've either got to put up, or shut up-as the saying goes."

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

Thursday, April 13, 1967

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Letter from Pierre Servais to MLK and Joan Daves

Tuesday, November 10, 1964

Pierre Servais writes to Dr. King on behalf of the publishing company that will soon be translating "Strength To Love" in French. Servais would like to know, among other things, if Dr. King will be able to make a stop in Paris or Brussels while he is in Europe. Servais would like to hear from Dr. King as soon as possible concerning a meeting because he would like to launch the French version of "Strength To Love", while Dr. King is in Europe.

MLK Memorandum on SCLC Direct Action Plans

In this confidential memorandum, Dr. King outlines SCLC’s direct action program for Birmingham, Alabama and Danville, Virginia. For each community, he states the challenges, defines goals, and then provides detailed steps to be taken and also staff assignments. He promises to outline his plan for Montgomery, Alabama in a few days.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Cass Canfield informs Dr. King that his company, Harper & Row Publishers Inc., won't publish Dr. Benjamin E Mays' book of memoirs.

Letter from Edward P. Blair to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965

Mrs. Edward P. Blair, Executive Secretary for the Evanston Council of Churches, informs Dr. King that two enclosed checks totaling $298.78 is a contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Roselle Siegal to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Roselle Siegal extends her appreciation and moral support of Dr. King by means of this Western Union telegram.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Martin Fischer at the Theological Seminary of Berlin

Monday, September 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks Dr. Fischer and the faculty at the Theological Seminary of Berlin for awarding him with an honorary degree. He expresses that the honor gives him courage to strive on and wishes them multiple blessings from God.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rennie Kiah

Friday, July 29, 1966

Dr. King and Dora McDonald express their gratitude for Mr. Rennie L. Kiah's suggestions. Mr. Kiah brings awareness to Dr. King about the "unkempt" property owned by the City of Atlanta. Dr. King attempts to contact the City Manager to clean up the property that is next to Ebenezer Church.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

Nonviolence

Dr. King defines nonviolence as a "sword" that attacks hatred by striking at the conscience and morality of man.

Letter from Joan Daves to Hoki Ishihara

Monday, August 24, 1964

Joan Daves encloses a copy of a manuscript of the proposed speech to be given in Berlin by Dr. King. Daves also indicates the fifty-dollar fee for the one-time publication of Dr. King's comments about the late President Kennedy.

Royalty Statement for Strength To Love

This financial document from Joan Daves, an agent of Harper & Row in New York City, references an itemized Royalty statement for Dr. King's book, "Strength To Love."

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Wyatt Tee Walker

Friday, November 20, 1964

Dr. King's secretary sends Wyatt Tee Walker information regarding the upcoming trip to Oslo, Norway.

Revelation Baptist Church Program for "A Knock at Midnight"

Sunday, September 27, 1964

This program outlines the Revelation Baptist Church Sunday Worship Service on September 27, 1964. The booklet lists Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth, co-founder of the SCLC, as the church's presiding minister. On this occasion, Dr. King addressed the congregation from the pulpit with the sermon "A Knock at Midnight," which had been published the year before. Dr. King's handwritten notes seem to outline another talk on the back cover.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Owen Hungerford Regarding Finances

Monday, December 12, 1966

Harry Wachtel informs Owen Hungerford that Dr. King has approved the enclosed financial statement. Relative tax exemption material is also forwarded.

Letter from MLK to Birch Bayh

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Birch Bayh's support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In addition, Dr. King prays for Mr. Bayh's recovery from his recent accident.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Peggy Duff invites Dr. King to speak in Copenhagen on behalf of the Danish Peace Movement.

DeWolf, Harold

Dr. King references Harold DeWolf's book, "A Theology of the Living Church."

Time

Dr. King highlights a quote regarding time. [This quote is attributed to Henry Austin Dobson.]

Integrating Classes

Friday, August 12, 1966

This article discusses Harold Howe II's opinion regarding segregated schools and his work towards integration. Howe asserts that segregation is bad for anyone concerned, such as minorities, poor kids, whites, or blacks.