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Letter from Jose Luis Villar Palasi to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
Madrid, Spain

Jose Luis Villar Palasi informs Dr. King tha that the Chair for Cultural Sociology has invited him to present at the Universidad of Madrid.

Interruptions: Man from Porlock

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Dr. King delivered this sermon, "Interruptions," on January 21, 1968 at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He describes how no one lives a life free of interruptions, and that the major problem of life is learning how to handle them.

Bread at Midnight

Tuesday, December 13, 1966
Georgia (GA), SOUTH AFRICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Letter from Weston C. Pullen to MLK

Tuesday, July 2, 1963
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Weston C. Pullen, Vice President for Broadcasting at Time Incorporated, thanks Dr. King for his expedited response and cooperation "in filming a message on civil rights."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eliot Stadler

Monday, June 22, 1964
St. Augustine, FL, Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN)

Dora McDonald communicates the traveling details to Eliot Stadler regarding his temporary staff placement in the SCLC.

Letter to Robert F. Kennedy from Dora McDonald

Thursday, May 4, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald writes Senator Kennedy to inform him that his recent letter to Dr. King came in his absence. She states that the letter will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return to the Atlanta office.

Letter from MLK to R. P. Bass, Jr.

Thursday, June 16, 1966
New Hampshire (NH)

Dr. King thanks Mr. Bass for his contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the progress of Negros in the South and explains the importance of supporters.

Letter from Leonard Chadwick to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Berkeley, CA

Chadwick, a student at Lincoln school of Berkeley, California, offers encouragement to Dr. King and his continuous efforts for social good.

God: Judeo-Christian View vs. Greek View

Dr. King cites a passage from the Old Testament book of Psalms to compare and contrast the Jewish and Greek view of God.

Cause, Error and Law

Dr. King quotes from Alfred North Whitehead's The Concept of Nature.

God (His Existence)

Dr. King quotes Alfred, Lord Tennyson's "The Ancient Sage" after posing the question, "Can we prove God's existence?"

Letter from Nancy Parr to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1968
San Francisco, CA

In this letter, Nancy Parr offers help to Dr. King in trying to "avert riots in 1968" to prevent the "right-wing" from taking over the nation.

1922 Work

Dr. King identifies different philosophical points of Alfred North Whitehead's 1922 publication, titled "The Principle of Relativity with Applications to Physical Science."

God (His Existence)

Change title to conform to Dr. King’s filing system.

Letter from MLK to Earl Hall

Friday, July 14, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mr. Earl Hall, who sent a letter to the "National Observer" in defense of Dr. King.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

Negro's Defense Against Acts of Violence

Dr. King describes nonviolent direct action and its effects against oppressors of the movement. He speaks about the undaunted fight and relentlessness even in the face of brutality.

Invitation from Israeli Ambassador to MLK

Tuesday, March 30, 1965
ISRAEL, Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Avraham Harman invites Dr. King to Israel on behalf of the Embassy of Israel.

MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

New York, NY, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), California (CA), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE, CHINA, JAPAN, MEXICO, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Georgia (GA), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), GUATEMALA, COLOMBIA, PERU, THAILAND, CAMBODIA, MOZAMBIQUE, GERMANY, PHILIPPINES, UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, HAITI, NICARAGUA, South Africa

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

On December 11, 1964, Dr. King delivered his Nobel lecture at the University of Oslo. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition for the nonviolent struggle to eradicate racial injustice in the U.S., King worked nearly a month on this address. He went far beyond his dream for America and articulated his vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers and sisters or perish together as fools. For citations, go to Dr. King's lecture at nobleprize.org.

Letter from Robert Hatch to Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 25, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Robert Hatch, a staff associate with the National Education Association, asks Miss McDonald to inform Dr. King of an invitation to speak at the organization's banquet in New York City. Hatch mentions that he is not only a former Morehouse classmate of Dr. King's, but also lived in Montgomery, Alabama at the same time as Dr. King and Ralph Abernathy.

Proclaim Liberty...

Atlanta, GA

Carl T. Rowan, one of the most prominent black journalists of the 20th century, is honored at the Progressive Club in Atlanta, GA. This reservation form was sent out to invited guests of the celebration.

Moral Progress

Dr. King describes moral progress as endless struggle toward "an infinite goal," which will lead to "happiness."

MLK at a Communist Training School

Tennessee (TN), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

This document depicts prominent civil rights and political leaders allegedly at a communist training school. This anti-King document asks the question, "what kind of American are you?"

Letter from MLK to Linda Cann

Tuesday, November 30, 1965
CANADA

Dr. King writes Linda Cann, a member of the Canadian Women's Press Club in Halifax, Nova Scotia. He informs Mrs. Cann that he cannot accept her invitation to speak in Nova Scotia because he is trying to "grapple with the problems of discrimination that Negroes still face."

Letter from Donald Prince to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Donald Prince wrote this letter the day after Dr. King's assassination and addressed it to Mrs. King.

Letter from Andre Katz to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968
GHANA, Chicago, IL

Andrea Katz, editor of Quadrangle Books, informs Dr. King about a book titled, "Where to, Black Man?" It is a diary of an African American man, Ed Smith, who traveled to Africa to reaffirm his American identity.

Freedom

Dr. King quotes from Hegel's "The Philosophy of History."

Letter from Charles Sherrod to Friends of SNCC

Saturday, July 22, 1961
Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

Field Secretary Charles Sherrod invites friends of the SNCC to an emergency meeting to outline the direction of the student and Civil Rights Movement. The meeting is to be held at the Highlander Folk School in Tennessee which serves as a training ground for nonviolence and civil rights activities.

Telegram to MLK from the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Club

Wednesday, September 24, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

The New York Chapter of the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Club wishes a speedy recovery to Dr. King while he is hospitalized in Harlem Hospital.