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Letter from MLK to Mr. Wiley Bell

Thursday, July 25, 1963

In this letter, Dr. King writes a thank you note to Mr. Bell for his support concerning "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

We are Still Walking

Saturday, December 1, 1956

Dr. King describes how African Americans reacted to the Klan's plan to intimidate them after the decision of the Supreme Court. Although deeply involved in the bus protest, Dr. King stated that there were other goals to achieve such as establishing a bank and credit union in Montgomery for African Americans.

Letter from MLK to Blaine Marrin

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Blaine Marrin and the local 157 UAW members for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He explains the current efforts of the organization and the relationship between the labor and civil rights movements. He also discusses the financial needs of the SCLC and the importance of contributions.

Letter from James McDaniel to MLK

Monday, October 31, 1966

This appreciation letter from James A McDaniel, thanks Dr. King for his willingness to serve as a member on the Executive Committee of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Letter from Robert Birley to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Robert Birley invites Dr. King to give an address at a program in London. Mr. Birley informs Dr. King of the four topics that will be discussed and requests that Dr. King address the topic of racial discrimination.

MLK's Speaking Itinerary

This list of speaking engagements documents Dr. King's busy schedule, in June 1965.

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Monday, August 20, 1962

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Letter to Mr. Wilkinson from Dr. Schrade

Monday, May 3, 1965

Dr. Schrade asks Mr. Wilkinson in the NAACP office in New York to pass on a request for Dr. King to write an article for his magazine. Previous Nobel Prize winners have submitted an autograph photo and a short biography to the magazine. In additional to the requested article, Dr. Schrade hopes Dr. King will do the same.

Esquire Magazine: The Red Chinese American Negro

This segment of Esquire Magazine features an article discussing the militant activities of Robert F. Williams. Williams had returned home from military service and headed the Monroe, North Carolina branch of the NAACP. Frustrated by the inactivity of local legislation to reform segregation and aggravated by Klu Klux Klan attacks, Williams adopted more violent methodologies. The article also emphasizes his association with Chinese leader Mao Tse-tung and discusses Tse-tung's solidarity with racial goodwill policies.

House Un-American Activities Committee

Friday, May 15, 1964

This article summarizes the consequences that derive from the House Un-American Activities Committee labeling Civil Rights leaders as communists.

Co-Op Movements for Black Economic Development

This memorandum sent to Dr. King by Professor St. Clair Drake, is a full proposal for the development/revival of the co-operative movements among negroes in large urban centers.

Spring Mobilization Committee Roundup of Nationwide Mobilization Activity

Monday, April 3, 1967

This document outlines activities around the country leading up to the April 15 Spring Mobilization Against the War in Vietnam rally in New York City.

Letter from Bronx High School Student Paul Kylar to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Paul Kylar, a student from the Bronx, writes Dr. King to convey support for his plea for peace. Kylar mentions that he attended a peace parade and how elated he is to know that Dr. King works for all people and not just Negroes.

Letter from MLK to Miss Joanne Adams

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to a letter from Joanne Adams, a teenager from Central High School, stating that letters like hers from young people around the country inspire him that youth are so conscious of the issues that affect our world.

Letter from the KKK Kids to MLK

An anonymous member of The K.K.K. Kids writes Dr. King expressing that he or she believes Dr. King to be "a very ignorant person."

Letter from MLK to Sara B. Jackson

Friday, April 13, 1956

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mrs. Jackson for her moral and financial support.

Invitation from C.W. De Kiewiet to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Cornell William De Kieweit invites Dr. King to speak as the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecturer at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Mr. De Kieweit explains the civil rights struggle in South Africa and explains that Dr. King's appearance would be of great help.

Is It Wrong to Segregate?

Sunday, June 5, 1960

This Sermon titled "Is It Wrong to Segregate?" was delivered by the Reverend A. L. Kendrick on June 5, 1960. He expounds on several topics including equal rights, communism and the political element of the government.

Telegram from Operation Breadbasket Leaders to Ivan Allen

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

This telegram originates from leaders of the Atlanta chapter of Operation Breadbasket and urges the Mayor to take action on employment opportunities for African-Americans.

We Shall Overcome Sketch

Charlie Cheese Carson's created this sketch which illustrates many notable civil rights leaders as chess pieces.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from Fred Lofton

Written on SCLC stationary, Fred Lofton addressed this letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy. On behalf of his church, First African Baptist Church, Mr. Lofton pledged to continue to extend support for the work of SCLC.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

Cass Canfield informs Dr. King that his company, Harper & Row Publishers Inc., won't publish Dr. Benjamin E Mays' book of memoirs.

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee on the issues of civil rights, segregation, and voters registration. He urges the party to join the crusade for social justice and equality for all.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Watkins

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Watkins regarding her son's current legal situation.

Myths and Facts About OEO

This document lists myths and facts regarding the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Letter from Geo. Roosevelt Yancey to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Rev. Yancey invites Dr. King to be the guest speaker at the Golden Anniversary of Gethsemane Baptist Church. Rev. Yancey expresses regret that Dr. King had been unable to accept a previous invitation because of the inauguration of President Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana.

Pride

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine and C. S. Lewis on pride.

Letter of Support to SCLC from SAVE

Friday, July 7, 1967

Gladys Weekes states that she and her fellow members of the Southern Assistant Volunteer Effort (SAVE) are happy to again support the SCLC.

Crisis In the Nation

Dr. King and Joseph E. Lowery inform an anonymous recipient of an urgent meeting of the SCLC Executive Board.

Letter from Adam Powell to MLK

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

In this letter, Mr. Powell informs Dr. King how important he is to society and that he is in full support of his work. He also wishes to invite Dr. King to the next session of Congress for advice and ideas.