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Telegram from Philip A. Randolph to MLK

Monday, August 8, 1966
New York (NY)

Philip A. Randolph writes Dr. King concerning Negro leaders being invited to discuss problems of the movement on NBC television.

Letter from Mrs. R. E. Rufenacht to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968
Arizona (AZ)

Mrs. Rufenacht thanks Dr. King for his support of white workers who requested his help. She also encloses a contribution for the work of the SCLC.

Three Year Proposal for the Renewal of the Negro Church in America

Chicago, IL

In this three-year proposal for the renewal of the Negro Church, there are several line items and subfields describing various ways in which this goal may be accomplished.

Sacrifice

Dr. King interprets Proverbs 21:3 to mean that God wants righteousness and justice not burnt offerings.

Letter from Patricia Kleps to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
San Francisco, CA

Dr. King informs Mrs. Patricia Kleps that he will be unable to fulfill her request to speak at the First Unitarian Church in San Francisco. However, Dr. King pledges to contact her around January of 1968 to possibly schedule a date for him to address her congregation.

God

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth regarding the nature of God. In addition, Dr. King provides bibliographical information for the quote.

Invitation from Charles H. Day to MLK

Wednesday, December 8, 1965
Iowa (IA)

In this letter, Charles H. Day encloses a letter that invites Dr. King to Iowa on the behalf of Reverend Edwin T. Dahlberg.

Letter to MLK from C. Linski

Tuesday, February 15, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This letter from Mr. C. Linski, invites Dr. King to work on the project for a shopping mall in Calumet City IL. The goal would be for the shops to hire 50% Negroes through the "Operation Employment for Negroes".

Letter from Virginia M. Burke & Phyllis M. Banks to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963
Milwaukee, WI, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Virginia Burke and Phyllis Banks express their interest in distributing "The Negro Is Your Brother", better known as "Letter from Birmingham Jail", to Wisconsin leaders to inform them of the goals and aspirations of Dr. King and his following. Burke and Banks explain that while the document had appeared in multiple publications, they feel that it has yet to reach the wide audience it deserves. They ask Dr. King's permission to reprint and distribute the document if he holds the copyright.

Letter from Unitarian Universalist Association President Dana McLean Greeley to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965
Massachusetts (MA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Dana McLean Greeley asks for Dr. King's endorsement of a conference on religion and peace to be held in Washington, DC, and invites Dr. King to serve on the Executive Committee of the conference. Greeley also recounts his time spent in Selma and mentions that he will be in Montgomery soon.

Worship

Dr. King references William Ernest Hocking and James Bissett Pratt regarding religious worship.

Letter from MLK to Robert J. McCracken

Thursday, February 27, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King declines to preach twice on one Sunday at Riverside Church in New York City. Besides time constraints, he needs to conserve his strength as per his doctor's recommendation. Because the 1964 World's Fair will be in New York at that time, they expect big crowds, requiring two services.

Telegram from Mrs. King to Mr. & Mrs. Silverboard

Thursday, January 9, 1969
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King forwarded this telegram to the Silverboard family of Atlanta, Georgia, in 1969. She wanted to convey sympathy for the death of their father and hoped that the family would find comfort. The spiritual bond of love, according to Mrs. King, is a mechanism that unites families during times of sorrow.

Letter from Robert E. Harding, Thomas H. Weddington and Celestine B. Bailey to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967
New York, NY

Robert E. Harding Jr., Thomas H. Weddington, and Celestine B. Bailey detail the many allegations of racial discrimination involving employees from the National Labor Relations Board. These issues have conflicted with the Equal Employment Opportunity and the Civil Service Rules and Regulations. Harding, Weddington, and Bailey request Dr. King's assistance to correct this issue.

Anonymous Sender Criticizes MLK

Michigan (MI), VIETNAM

This anonymous writer challenges Dr. King with his complaints concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He argues that a Negro man should be held responsible for breaking the law and should expect rightful punishment.

Letter from Richard Actis-Grande to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Richard Actise-Grande notifies Dr. King of an enclosed advance copy of Look Magazine. Actise-Grande believes that articles by Eric Sevareid, a former CBS news reporter and war correspondent, and Senator Edward Brooke will be of special interest to Dr. King.

Telegram from Hosea Williams to President Johnson

Tuesday, August 3, 1965
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Hosea Williams writes to President Lyndon B. Johnson requesting an investigation of the Andy Whatley murder.

Letter from C.B. Atkins to MLK

Tuesday, June 12, 1962
New York, NY, Los Angeles, CA

In this document the writer thanks Dr. King for meeting with him concerning the proposed "Martin King album" and television series. The writer encloses a memorandum on consumer information and requests King's travel schedule.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Thursday, December 9, 1965
Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

After hearing Dr. King's speech at Billanova University, Mr. Brownlow requests that the Reverend speak at the Haverford School located in Pennsylvania. Secondarily, Brownlow requests that Dr. King send a few words of congratulations to a student attending the college.

Telegram from MLK to Chauncey Eskridge

Saturday, May 12, 1962
Chicago, IL, New York, NY

Serving as the Honorary President, Dr. King invites Chauncey Eskridge to the Gandhi Society for Human Rights luncheon held in Washington, D.C., where he will be able to provide legal services to many southern Negroes in need.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963
Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

Assisrtant US Attorney General Burk Marshall informs Dr. King that the allegations of police misconduct in Danville, Virginia are being investigated by the Department of Justice and assures him that the appropriate actions will take place "with respect to any violations of federal law."

Letter from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Monday, August 15, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, CANADA

An anonymous resident of Illinois informs Dr. King of their efforts to help co-workers understand the civil rights movement as a peaceful one. The writer offers encouragement to Dr. King and states hopefully in his/her lifetime equality for the Negro will be achieved.

Letter from Vilna Torres to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Vilna Torres writes a letter of condolence to Mrs. King after Dr. King's assassination.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Chilean Citizens

CHILE

Dr. King thanks Rodolfo Molina and Arturo Venegas for their contribution and support to the Civil Rights Movement.

Information about Poor People's Campaign

VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

The Poor Peoples Campaign asserts that it will demand decent jobs and income for poor Americans of all races and ethnicities. Furthermore the Campaign vows to address constitutional and moral rights, along with the rights of exploited immigrants.

Telegram from American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa to President Johnson

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, South Africa

Members of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa express their disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and ask for U.S. intervention.

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Monday, June 17, 1963

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Sargent Shriver discusses the success of the Upward Bound program at Morehouse College. Upward Bound is a program as part of the national war against poverty.

Letter to Baron Allard from Mrs. King

Thursday, June 15, 1967
BELGIUM, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King writes to Baron Allard to thank him for the time she spent in Belgium. She thanks him for the gifts he sent for her loved ones and extends an invitation to visit when he travels to Atlanta.

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to Randolph T. Blackwell

Friday, December 2, 1966
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Harry Wachtel informs Randolph Blackwell that he's including $4,500 for the Southern Rural Action Project. The purpose of the project is to reduce the amount of poverty known to be prevalent in the south.