Themes

The Archive

Search results for:
"South Africa"

Letter from Leroy Johnson to MLK

State Senator Leroy R. Johnson forwards a Senate Pass to Dr. King, and informs him of an open invitation to visit the Senate at his leisure.

Revelation

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from Dr. King to Rev. & Mrs. Sargent

Monday, November 8, 1965

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. & Mrs. Sargent for their efforts in getting him to visit Paris and for their support of funding SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Joseph Lowery

Friday, November 11, 1966

Dr. King discloses possible discrepancies made by Hosea Williams. He further proposes individuals to investigate the allegations brought against Mr. Williams.

Letter from Esther Davey to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

Esther Davey writes Dr. King in support of his crusade. She expresses her dismay in some of Dr. King's speeches made after the march from Selma, Alabama and stresses the importance of Christianity in his crusade.

Letter from Corinne B. Hill and Harold Stassen to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 12, 1967

Harold Stassen correspond with Dora McDonald expressing gratitude for a letter sent a few days earlier. The letter involves a book to be written by Dr. King.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to the Women's Strike for Peace

Saturday, June 22, 1963

Mrs. King writes to the Women's Strike for Peace to extend her appreciation for their support in the area of civil rights.

Letter from Joyce Wilmoth to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

A student at Lesley College requests Dr. King's presence at their school debate in honor of their participation in Choice '68 sponsored by Time.

Letter from John Brooks to MLK

John Brooks affirms the importance of Dr. King's work and informs Dr. King of an enclosed contribution to the SCLC.

God (Definition)

Dr. King records ideas on Karl Marx's and John Dewey's definitions of God.

MLK Note

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

Letter from Benjamin Conklin to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Mr. Conklin writes this letter urging Rev. Abernathy to rethink the decision to proceed with the Peoples March on Washington. He is concerned that with the recent assassination of Dr. King this action will only alienate Congress and the American public. Hence the march could cause more bloodshed.

Letter from Samuel S. Backlar to MLK

Friday, October 3, 1958

Samuel S. Backlar, Chairman of the American Legion New York County Organization, writes Dr. King wishing him a "speedy recovery" and invites him to speak at Abraham Lincoln's 150th birthday celebration.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Letter from Aggrey Oji to Theodore Brown

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

Mr. Oji writes Mr. Brown thanking him for a previous correspondence of support regarding various issues in Nigeria. Mr. Oji also offers to meet with Mr. Brown and other members of the American Negro Leadership Conference to discuss further issues.

MLK Speaks on Church Bombing in Birmingham, AL

Monday, September 16, 1963

Dr. King speaks on the bombing at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church that killed four girls in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from MLK to Maurine B. Neuberger

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Oregon Senator Maurine B. Neuberger to express gratitude for her support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Pastor William A. Lawson to MLK

Sunday, September 25, 1966

Pastor Bill Lawson writes Dr. King seeking his help with spreading the Civil Rights Movement in Houston. He asks King to establish a permanent SCLC office in Houston and engage in nonviolent demonstrations.

Progressive National Baptist Convention Sixth Annual Session

Monday, July 31, 1967

This news release outlines the events and participants for the Sixth Annual Session of the Progressive National Baptist Convention to be held in Cincinnati, Ohio. The theme of the conference is Spiritual Renewal in a Decaying Society.

Moral Progress

Dr. King describes moral progress as endless struggle toward "an infinite goal," which will lead to "happiness."

MLK's notecard regarding social gospel

Dr. King outlines his views on social gospel.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy and MLK to Howard W. Creecy

Monday, June 19, 1967

Dr. King and Ralph Abernathy inform Reverend Creecy they will be serving a five day jail sentence for breaking an injunction against demonstrating in Birmingham, Alabama. It is for this reason that the Clergymen's Conference will have to be moved to a later date.

Royalty Statement for Japanese Edition of Stride Toward Freedom

Friday, May 19, 1967

Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the Japanese edition of Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," including the number of copies sold in 1966.

Letter from Apuyva J. Mehta to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

Written on the day of Mahatma Gandhi's birthday, Mehta requests Dr. King's autograph.

Letter from Ellen Tamaki to MLK

Friday, November 24, 1967

Ellen M. Tamaki, from Berkeley, California, has a list of questions for Dr. King that center on accusations of "merg[ing] the peace movement with the civil rights struggle." The writer references Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War and asks about the motivation for his opinions.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Harry Belafonte expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. King for appearing with him on the "Tonight Show." Harry Belafonte concludes by thanking Dr. King for his friendship and for giving his time so generously.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nagle

Dr. King comments on a Supreme Court ruling that outlaws prayer and Bible reading in public schools. He asserts that the decision is consistant with the Constitution and is meant to keep any single religion from dominating the government.

Letter from Al Capp to MLK

Wednesday, May 27, 1964

Al Capp refuses to donate to the SCLC because he feels that organizations like Dr. King's promote violence against White Americans.

Mind

Dr. King writes on Herbert Spencer's interpretation of the mind.