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Remember Who You Are!

Thursday, December 6, 1956

Dr. King addresses the student body and officials of Howard University with a poignant sermon entitled, "Remember Who You Are." The content of the sermon makes various references between Jesus, Shakespeare and Greek philosophers who sought to identify the mechanisms that made man important to society.

Letter from Ruth Wood to MLK

Ruth Wood of Virginia offers her gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. King for their efforts in search of a better society. Mrs. Wood also expresses her pleasure at attending Ebenezer Baptist Church and intends to attend the upcoming SCLC meeting.

Letter from Annie Mae Williams to MLK

Sunday, May 2, 1965

Annie Mae Williams and her family make a contribution of $25 to Dr. King.

American Nurses' Association Names Judges for Integration Award

Friday, September 1, 1967

The American Nurses' Association announces its panel of judges for the 1968 Mary Mahoney Award, which honors progress in integration and nursing.

SCLC Proposal for Recruiting "Grass Root" Delegates

Monday, June 12, 1967

This document contains a proposal for recruiting 1,745 "grass root" delegates to the SCLC's 1967 Annual Convention. Also included is a desired amount of delegates from southern states, a proposed list of meeting places, and a budget for recruiting the delegates.

MLK Request from Princeton Committee for Negotiation Now

Friday, November 10, 1967

Mary Temple of the Princeton Committee for Negotiation, invites Dr. King to make an appearance at a fundraising event.

Letter from Earl W. Hall to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

The National Observer publishes an article entitled "Prophet or Propagandist" to critique Dr. King's political stance on the Vietnam War. Earl Hall objects to these perceptions deliberated in this article and contacts the National Observer to express his concerns. To support his argument, Mr. Hall references biblical prophets from the Old Testament. Mr. Hall communicates this information with Dr. King and informs him of their correlating views on the Vietnam War.

Reader Strikes Parallel Between America, Nazis

This document contains two letters to the editor of an unknown newspaper. The first letter is written by Edwin Johnson. He criticizes the war in Vietnam, making comparisons between the Nazis and the American military. E.D., the author of the second letter, also criticizes the war, calling for an end to the violence in Vietnam.

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

Letter from Mrs. Ross D. Davis to MLK

Monday, February 14, 1966

Mrs. Davis invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker for the Women's National Democratic Club.

Letter from Fred Becker to MLK in Regard to Speaking Engagements

Monday, January 14, 1963

Mr. Fred C. Becker writes to Dr. King about his speaking engagement, lectures, and attendance at special meetings. He requested that Dr. King would send a list of speaking engagements in as advance as possible. The publishers wanted the opportunity to allow the public to be aware of his speaking schedule, so they may be able to purchase his books.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "The Bible"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Program - SCLC Presentation of Mahalia Jackson

Sunday, December 1, 1963

This SCLC program is for Miss Mahalia Jackson's concert benefitting the organization.

SCLC Confab Boasts Galaxy of Civil Rights Stars

The SCLC has chosen Birmingham, Alabama as the place for their Sixth Annual Convention. It includes the Annual Freedom Dinner, that will honor the top personalities identified with the Negro struggle. The convention also includes presentations from major authorities on nonviolence.

Letter from Milton S. Eisenhower to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966

This letter from former President Eisenhower's brother Milton, on behalf of Planned Parenthood World Population, requests that Dr. King serve the organization in order to "lend important moral support."

A Letter to Advisory Council Member from Robert L. Green

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

In this correspondence, Robert L. Green writes an Advisory Council member concerning the Chicago adult education project. Mr. Green notifies the member that due to a reduced monetary grant from the federal government, the program will officially close.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elisabeth Babcock

Tuesday, April 27, 1965

Dora McDonald responds to a request from Elisabeth Babcock regarding the possibility of Dr. King visiting her in New York. Unfortunately, the hectic schedule in Dr. King's travels will not allow him such an opportunity. She conveys their gratitude for the "moral and financial support" Babcock has made for the betterment of the movement.

Plowshare Pledge from Sargent Shriver

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This Plowshare Pledge, signed by Sargent Shriver, vows to use voting powers to have the savings of the military expenses invested in domestic human resources.

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Friday, May 28, 1965

Laurence Kirkpatrick writes Dr. King on behalf of the World Convention of Churches and Christ expressing their appreciation for Dr. King's acceptance of their invitation and discusses the travel logistics.

Letter from Leonard Newell to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968

Leonard A. Newell writes to Dr. King to ask for his opinion about the pursuit of a consumer strike to protest the War in Vietnam.

Letter from Andrew Young to James Bevel and Dave Delliger

Tuesday, March 14, 1967

Andrew Young writes Revered James Bevel and Mr. Dave Dellinger confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at a rally in New York, New York on April 15th. Young further addresses logistical issues that may arise in the execution of the event, as well as how to best increase participation.

Highlander Center Press Release

This press release details the Highlander Center, an adult education center for people who come to learn how to deal with problems affecting their lives and communities, which was under investigation. The investigation was being conducted to determine if the Highland Center was integrated as stated in its charter.

Letter from John Mannix to MLK

Thursday, July 11, 1963

John Mannix, Chairman of the Program Committee, invites Dr. King to speak for the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Regarding Quotes

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves asks Dora McDonald to show Dr. King quotes attached to the document. Joan Daves also asks that comments and reviews be passed to her respectively.

Letter from Thomas Baker to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Baker, a student in New York City, sends his condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from S.Leiss to MLK Regarding Dutch Publication Rights

Wednesday, September 1, 1965

S. Leiss sent Dr King this satement regarding a payment for the Dutch rights to "Why We Can't Wait".

Public Speaking Flyer for Alabama Meeting

This is a 1967 program inviting "any white man, woman and child who is concerned about the affairs of [the] country," to felllowship and listen to the selected speakers of the evening.

Draft of MLK's An Open Letter to Negro Youth

In an open letter to Negro Youths, Dr. King urges them to stay committed to the nonviolent principles of social change in their plight to gain broad access to education and employment.

Telegram to Dr. Benjamin Spock from MLK

Monday, May 29, 1967

In May 1967 Dr. King sends a telegram to Dr. Spock (an American pediatrician whose book Baby and Child Care, published in 1946, is one of the biggest best-sellers of all time) while he is in Geneva to praise him on taking a stance on controversial issues.

Centennial Edition of The Nation

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

James J. Storrow, Jr., Publisher of The Nation, invites Dr. King to advertise in its 100th anniversary edition. Storrow suggests that Dr. King could write an article on SCLC's achievements and services to the community within the advertisement.