Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"South Africa"

Letter from High School Student to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Sheila Gavin is a high school student writing to Dr. King to inquire about his choice to be a part of the civil rights movement.

Telegram from Congressman Don Edwards to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

California Democratic Congressman Don Edwards congratulates Dr. King on his April 4th, 1967 speech "Beyond Vietnam," and commends his courage in speaking "so clearly on this vital question."

Letter from David M. Wallace to Dora McDonald

Monday, February 6, 1967

David Wallace writes Dora McDonald and attaches contributions from Negro businessmen involved with Chicago's Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Reverend Aaron T. Hoggard to MLK

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Reverend Aaron T. Hoggard, Minister of the Washington Street A. M. E. Zion Church, encloses a contribution to assist with Dr. King's efforts to help blacks achieve liberty.

"Dr. King Denounces Write-In Plot"

Monday, November 2, 1964

Contrary to what radio announcements and newspapers advertise, Dr. King urges Negro voters to vote for a presidential candidate that is already on the ballot. He expresses that he is not a candidate and does not want voters to write his name on the ballot.

Letter from Mrs. R.B. Hassell to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Writing from Memphis, Tennessee, Mrs. Hassell expresses her love for America and her concern regarding the cruel treatment many have experienced throughout the world. She offers encouragement to Dr. King and other preachers who are advocates for peace.

Test of Address by Vice President Richard M. Nixon

Friday, October 19, 1956

Vice President Nixon discusses the legacy of Alfred E. Smith and how it correlates with the American dream.

Letter from Bent Ostergaard to MLK

Tuesday, April 20, 1965

Bent Ostergaard, a member of Amnesty International, informs Dr. King that his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize served as a great pleasure for the Danish people. The Danish section of Amnesty International requests Dr. King's appearance during his travel to Europe. Mr. Ostergaard notifies Dr. King that his expenses will be covered and they would like to give him a tour of the public institutions in Denmark.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Edward A. Jones

Tuesday, April 9, 1963

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Edward Jones of Morehouse College, asking him to translate the enclosed letter for Dr. King.

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK about a Contribution

Thursday, March 9, 1967

In this letter A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King for contributions needed to carry out the work of the National Advisory Committee On Farm Labor (NACFL). Randolph states, "NACFL stretches its limited funds far, but now at this critical point we must ask for your support".

Man

Dr. King wrote these notes on Man from Psalms 89:48. He describes that while the Bible describes man as mortal, here appears the direct affirmation that every man shall die.

Letter from Arthur LeSueur to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967

Arthur LeSueur, a War World II veteran, expresses his support of Dr. King's endeavors to gain equality in America. He hopes that Dr. King will not be discouraged by the great injustices he has faced and will continue to hold strong to his position.

Telegram from LD Reddick to MLK

Saturday, October 22, 1960

In this letter, LD Reddick tells Dr. King that he is a magnificent example to other leaders. Reddick then tells Dr. King to ask the presidential candidates to state their views more specifically.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Program

Sunday, September 6, 1959

This program of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church's morning worship features Dr. King as the speaker for the service. The program further announces that Dr. King has donated one hundred dollars to the Scholarship for African students.

May 17 -- 11 Years Later

Saturday, May 22, 1965

Dr. King discusses the eleven years since the Supreme Court ruled that segregated schools were not constitutional in Brown v. Board of Education. He explains that it was not until the Civil Rights Act of 1964 that people began to understand the harms of segregation.

Letter from MLK to Carl Heassler

In this letter, Dr. King offers words of gratitude to Mr. Heassler for his letter of support. He goes on to critique the War in Vietnam with a nonviolent philosophy.

Thank you Letter from MLK

Friday, January 26, 1968

Thank you Letter from MLK to Dr. Jones at Morehouse College for an autographed copy of "A Candle In The Dark"

Invitation from President Kennedy to MLK

The President of the United States invites Dr. King to attend a luncheon at the White House.

Letter from John A. Clark to MLK Regarding Scriptures, Spiritual Advice and Prayer

Friday, June 9, 1967

In this letter, Reverend John A. Clark provides spiritual advice, scripture and prayer for Dr. King during hard times as well as for preparation of the future. Reverend John A. Clark also mentions starting a revival and revisiting Washington to D.C. to preach for a cause.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.

Let My People Vote

In this statement for the Amsterdam News, Dr. King assures that a victory is in the midst regarding the Senate's recent passage of the voting bill. He elaborates on the objectives of SCOPE, as there is much to accomplish. He ends the statement with the battle cry, "Let My People Vote."

Letter from Albert Turner to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

Albert Turner requests financial assistance from Dr. King to aid with the voting campaign against Governor Wallace.

Letter from Ivor Liss to MLK

Monday, April 15, 1963

Ivor M. Liss writes Dr. King and explains his support for the movement that Dr. King is leading. He talks about how being silent would actually hurt Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement. Liss explains that as a Jew he understands the fight for equality as it is something that Jewish people are still fighting for. He encloses a check for $100.00.

Letter from M. Rogers to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

M. Rogers objects to Dr. King's teachings and infers he should study the New Testament of the Bible. Mr. Rogers perceives that what Dr. King preaches causes "more resentment between the different races." He further elaborates on how he envisions the affects of "non-violence" and "civil disobedience."

Letter from Townsend Scudder to MLK

Thursday, April 2, 1964

Townsend Scudder, of the Friends Service Committee, contacts Dr. King to request the use and reproduction of the Birmingham Letter to appear in their pamphlet.

Letter from Thomas Richardson to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Richardson, a New York City student, offers his sympathy the day after Dr. King's assassination. He explains that he recently lost his father, so he understands the sadness Mrs. King feels.

Criticism of MLK's Methods

Thursday, August 24, 1967

The Author of this letter is very critical of Dr. King and accuses him of hating the white race and requests he return the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Mr. P. H. Waldraff

Dr. King shares his views of the American military presence in Vietnam and America's moral obligation to social justice.

Invitation to MLK from Randolph Carter

Wednesday, February 3, 1064

Randolph Carter invites Dr. King to be the featured leader in a Conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Letter from Edward O'Brien to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964

Edward O'Brien writes Dr. King inquiring about the release of his new book, as he is unable to find it in bookstores.