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"South Africa"

Letter from Dottie Hughes to Dr. and Mrs. King

Tuesday, October 27, 1964
ZAMBIA

Mrs. Hughes, a resident of Zambia, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She informs Dr. and Mrs. King that their efforts are being recognized in Africa.

Telegram from MLK to L. Venchael Booth

Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King congratulates Dr. Booth on receiving the Doctor of Divinity degree from Morehouse College.

Letter from David E. McGuire to All Members of First Westminster Presbyterian Church

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
New York (NY)

The Session of the First Westminster Presbyterian Church, Yonkers, NY urges a "write-in" campaign to federal, state, or municipal legislators requesting action in the areas of open housing, equal employment opportunities and civil rights.

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty Project Summary

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty summarizes a nationwide project focused on eradicating poverty, providing funding for education, and creating more effective ways to utilize welfare spending.

Telegram from Senator Phil Hart to MLK

Friday, June 21, 1963
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI

Senator Phil Hart of Michigan sends this telegram to Dr. King expressing his optimism about the eradication of segregation in America.

Letter from Mr. Richard V. Healy to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA)

In this 1967 letter Richard Healy, a student at the Boston University of Law, asks Dr. King for an interview "to conduct research into criminal responsibility of a subculture--the urban Negro."

"King's New Book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 23, 1967
Missouri (MO)

This Argus newspaper clipping is a mini review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Proposal for Chicago Schools

Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Virginia (VA)

This agenda outlines a strategic boycott of Chicago schools. The information is separated by three individual phases.

Law Suit Against Wrens Nest

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
Georgia (GA)

This letter from Mrs. A. L. Wilkinson to a lawyer, is urging this person to help a man to win his case against tha Association responsible for keeping Negroes from entering the Wren's Nest in Atlanta.

Letter from MLK to E. Weidner

Monday, February 26, 1962
Ohio (OH), New York (NY), New York, NY, NETHERLANDS, BRAZIL, RUSSIAN FEDERATION

Dr. King informs Mrs. E. Weidner that Negroes have enjoyed positions of respect and prestige in non-Negro nations. He cites several examples in history to this statement.

Postcard from Frank J. Meinen to the SCLC

Sunday, April 8, 1962
Wisconsin (WI)

Upon recently hearing Dr. King speak, Frank J. Meinen writes the SCLC to ask how he can help.

Ritschl

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl on Christology regarding Jesus' relation to God.

Postcard from Dekker Family

NETHERLANDS

The Dekker family of Holland sends its support to Dr. King.

Draft of SCLC 1964 Annual Report

Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

This is a draft of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference 1964 Annual Report. The document outlines developments that occurred in pursuits such as voter registration and Operation Breadbasket. The piece concludes with commentary on the future of the organization, specifically "deeper involvement in political action."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Gwen B. Geiges about Moral Support

Maryland (MD), VIETNAM

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Mrs. Geiges to thank her for her letter expressing support of his work in the movement.

Letter from MLK to Robert H. Gates

Monday, November 25, 1963
Missouri (MO), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King thanks Robert Gates for his contribution to the SCLC. King encloses an official receipt and expresses that his contribution will assist in their work in Birmingham and throughout the South.

Letter from John Reevs Calloway III to the SCLC

Friday, April 5, 1968
GERMANY

Mr. Galloway sends his condolences to the SCLC for the untimely death of Dr. King.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, September 10, 1965
JAPAN

Joan Daves notifies Dora McDonald that she is sending "two Japanese language copies of two titles". The titles were originally addressed to Dr. King via Joan's office.

Letter from J. Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, sends his thanks for Dr. King's telegram concerning the recent work of FBI agents in Alabama.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Greenwood, MS, Memphis, TN, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), New Hampshire (NH), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ruby Hurley

Thursday, January 3, 1963
Georgia (GA)

At Dr. King's request, Ms. McDonald sends Ruby Hurley a check from Delores Robinson for a lifetime membership in the NAACP.

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Letter from MLK to Sarah Harvey

Tuesday, November 28, 1961
UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King thanks Miss Harvey of Oxford, England for her contribution to his cause. He suggests that she inquire about any regulations governing money coming from England to the US. He also expresses his hope to meet her in his travels.

Letter from Maria A. Mochulski to MLK

Pittsburgh, PA, Atlanta, GA

Duquesne University requests that Dr. King provide information for the candidate he is supporting for the presidential elections of 1968. The universities Choice '68 committee is interested in having Dr. King speak to the student body.

The Negro Heritage Library

New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Pennsylvania (PA), California (CA), BURUNDI, CAMEROON, CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC, CHAD, CONGO / ZAIRE, ETHIOPIA, GABON, GAMBIA, GHANA, GUINEA, Co'te D'IVOIRE / IVORY COAST, KENYA, LIBERIA, MALAWI, MALI, NIGER, NIGERIA, RWANDA, SENEGAL, SIERRA LEONE, TOGO, UGANDA, ZAMBIA

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.

Letter from Rabbi Joel S. Goor to MLK

Tuesday, July 28, 1964
California (CA), St. Augustine, FL

Rabbi Joel Goor extends his appreciation to Dr. King for being able to participate in SCLC's 1964 desegregation campaign in St. Augustine, Florida. He feels that his involvement in the civil rights movement spirtitually enhances his role as an active religious leader. Rabbi Goor encloses a donation to the SCLC for assisting with his bail while being jailed in St. Augustine and a copy of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King to autograph.

MLK Draft from Strength to Love: The Answer to a Perplexing Question

Here is a draft chapter from Dr. King's book "Strength to Love" in which Dr. King discusses that the casting out of evil in human lives requires "both man and God."

God (His Omnipotence)

Dr. King defines omnipotence as meaning that God has the power to carry out His will. He notes that God must hold characteristics of both good and evil and states that few philosophers have acknowledged God's omnipotence.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable E.L. Bartlett

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Alaskan Congressman Edward Lewis Bartlett to express appreciation for his vote in support of passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Injunction Requested by the City of Birmingham against Protests

Birmingham, AL

The City of Birmingham submitted this "bill of injunction" to the Circuit Court of Alabama to try to stop the sit ins, boycott pickets, and marches led by Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC, and others in April of 1963. After the injunction was granted and served April 10th, they continued their civil disobedience and many more were arrested. From solitary confinement, Dr. King then wrote "Letter from a Birmingham Jail."