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War- Treitschke

Dr. King quotes Heinrich von Treitschke’s “Politics.”

Black Power

This is a chapter sermon for Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here?" The civil rights leader traces the early development of Black Power and its eventual surge onto the national political scene. Though understood as a direct opposition to the nonviolent movement that organizations like SCLC, CORE, and SNCC originally supported, King describes Black Power as a "disappointment wrapped in despair."

Volunteers Serving Program

This report highlights the voluntary efforts of programs serving for social justice along with numerous SCLC contributions.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Sunday, August 6, 1967

William Kivi forwards Dr. King a copy of a postcard addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The correspondence alleges that the riots occuring in urban cities are a result of a economic stronghold to keep, in Kivi's view, "oppressing the oppressed." Kivi uses an example of California Governor Ronald Reagan's proposal to nix any federal program that supplements the War on Poverty.

Letter from MLK and Others to H. Brownell

Wednesday, January 11, 1956

Dr. King and other prominent clergymen "urgently request" a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss discrimination against bus passengers.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey Preston

Friday, June 12, 1964

Ms. McDonald informs Mrs. Preston that two of Dr. King's friends have encouraged him to reconsider accepting an invitation to speak at her sorority's convention. Hopefully, rearrangement of Dr. King's schedule will permit his acceptance.

Letter from Marshall Breland to MLK

Saturday, January 29, 1966

Marshall Breland, a student from P.S. 200, requests information from Dr. King for the purposes of a school related assignment. Breland deems Dr. King "The Non-Violent Crusader".

The Dexter Echo: February 20, 1957

Wednesday, February 20, 1957

The Dexter Echo is the official publication of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. The newsletter mentions Dr. King, who was minister of the church at the time, and Coretta Scott King in articles pertaining to their farewell party and Mrs. King receiving an award.

Symbolism and the Cross

Dr. King records notes on symbolism as the expression of spiritual truths.

Cover to Cover

Saturday, June 24, 1967

The Trentonian newspaper, under the subheading "Cover to Cover," published a brief review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community." This review examines Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" was Dr. King's first publication, since he received the Nobel Peace Prize. The book was published and released in 1967.

Letter from Joan Sinkler to MLK

Joan Sinkler writes Dr. King expressing that she is disappointed with him for not mentioning "the racist and colonialist character" of the Vietnam War. Sinkler asserts that the US did not go to war to protect Hungary, Cuba or Tibet.

Foreword to Neil Sullivan's Book by MLK

Dr. King submits a rough draft of his foreword for a text written by Berkeley County Public Schools Superintendent Neil Sullivan.

Dort, Canons of

Dr. King documents a brief history of the Arminian judicial decision, officially titled "The Decision of the Synod of Dort."

Letter from Alex Pascal to MLK

Mr. Pascal states that the American people are ignorant to the facts of Vietnam. He praises a recent speech by Dr. King on the subject, and he requests a copy of it.

Statement of Royalty Account

Tuesday, June 29, 1965

This financial statement reflects SCLC's affiliation with Motown Record Corporation.

Letter from Edward Boland to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Representative Edward P. Boland informs Dr. King of his signing of the Discharge Petition for Home Rule in the District of Columbia.

Letter from Gerhard Amendt to MLK

Gerhard Amendt of the West German Radio Corporation expresses his interest in having Dr. King give his opinion of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Morehouse College to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

The Morehouse Board of Trustees sends Dr. King a letter to accept the Committee's recommendation to elect Dr. Hugh Gloster as the next president of Morehouse College.

Letter from Daniel Glantz to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968

This letter is from Daniel Glantz of Sweden. Glantz wrote the letter because he was ordered to do so by beings from outer space. According to Glantz the space beings look like angels and the angels would like to meet with Dr. King, whose mission they morally support. Glantz ends his letter by asking Dr. King if he recognizes the cosmic symbol, which is in the upper left-hand corner of the document and appears as a red circle with a white cross topped by a green triangle or pyramid.

Letter From Lillian Gilhertsen to MLK

Wednesday, June 26, 1963

Lillian Gilbertson sends Dr. King some renewals after being prompted by Chauncey Eskridge. She also requests Dr. King's response to the issue.

Postage Stamp, April 4, 1968

This postage stamp to Washington D.C is dated April 4, 1968.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Maurice B. Fagan

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Dora McDonald confirms receipt of recent letter from Mr.Maurice Fagan. She conveys to Mr. Fagan of Dr. King's desire to nominate The Honorable Richard Hatcher Mayor of Gary, Indiana, for the 1967 National Fellowship Award.

Montesquieu

Dr. King references French social commentator Montesquieu regarding his ideas on history. King quotes, "He attempts to show how civilization has been modified by the action of the external world."

Thank You Letter from MLK to Reverend Terrell

Friday, May 5, 1967

Dr.King expresses his deep appreciation to Union Baptist Church for their generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Secrets of Married Happiness

Dr. King writes notes regarding the way to a successful marriage. King asserts that in order to have a happy marriage, husband and wife must communicate and get to know one another's similarities and differences. It is also important to engage in mutual compromise.

MLK Sermon: Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Dr. King gives a sermon on why he does not support the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Douglas B. Leeds to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Douglas Leeds, Campus Coordinator for Choice '68 at Babson Institute of Business Administration, writes Dr. King to request any information regarding his political views. He also invites Dr. King to speak at the Institute in the future.

Letter from Wilbur C. Davis to MLK

Tuesday, February 8, 1966

Wilbur C. Davis writes Dr. King seeking prayer for him and his family. Davis also includes a poem that he wrote regarding Dr. King's life and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

What Martin Luther King Really Has on His Mind

Sunday, July 9, 1967

The Detroit Free Press reviewed Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The review examines Dr. King's stance on the slogan "Black Power," his disappointment with moderation and his views against the Vietnam War. According to Dr. King, "The bombs in Vietnam explode at home; they destroy the hopes and possibilities for a decent America."

MLK's Statement on Birmingham Jails

Monday, May 6, 1963

During a broadcast, Dr. King states that the witness and determination of those incarcerated in Birmingham, will break down the barriers of segregation.