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"South Africa"

Rabbi Heschel on the War on Vietnam

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rabbi Abraham Heschel, civil rights advocate and associate of Dr. King, writes on the ethical corruption created by the Vietnam War. Calling the war an example of "extreme absurdity" that has been "nurtured on stereotypes," Rabbi Heschel encourages American citizens to recognize the demoralization of the war and take action against it.

Letter from Irene Harper to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 22, 1963
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL)

Irene Harper inquires of Dr. King's secretary if it would be possible to meet with the King family.

A Statement to the South and Nation

Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), HUNGARY, South Africa

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

Job

Dr. King reflects on the purpose of suffering in the Book of Job and how Job deals with it.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Borden Parker Bowne. The first name Gordon on the note card is incorrect.

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy to show that anyone who gives to the poor will be blessed.

Executive "Action Team" of Dr. King's SCLC Leads Aggressive Programs for Human Rights

Monday, February 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

This news release discusses programs developed by the SCLC Executive Action Team to aggressively address the human rights struggles of the American Negro. Some of these programs include the Citizenship Education Program, Operation Breadbasket and the Urban Leadership Program.

Letter from Walter Martin to SCLC Officials

Tuesday, February 28, 1967
New York, NY, South Africa

Walter Martin of the American Friends Service Committee, writes to numerous SCLC officials concerning Quaker work in Southern Africa.

Aristotle's Answer to Parmenides

Dr. King outlines Aristotle's response to Parmenides regarding being and nothingness.

God (Definition)

Dr. King records ideas on Karl Marx's and John Dewey's definitions of God.

Letter from Omar Burleson to MLK

Tuesday, September 14, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

In response to a previous telegram, Omar Burleson, Chairman of the Eighty-Ninth Congress, writes Dr. King to assure him that proper consideration is being given in the Mississippi Congress Delegation.

Telegram from Sylvester Nichols to Mrs. King

Friday, May 3, 1968
Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. King received many telegrams, following the assassination of Dr. King. This telegram, in particular, came from Sylvester Nichols and the members of the Brooklyn branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The association wanted to extend sympathy to the King family and to inform Mrs. King that they would continue to live out Dr. King's principles.

Letter from M. Emelene Wishart to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

M. Emelene Wishart is concerned that Dr. King is weakening the fight for civil rights by campaigning to end the Vietnam War. Wishart asks Dr. King if he is attempting to "embarrass the US administration or beat Carmichael in the civil disobedience game."

Dignity Is the Best Way

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL

The Atlanta Constitution writes about Dr. King serving a five day sentence for contempt of court in Birmingham.

Jainism

Dr. King notes a quote regarding the philosophy of Jainism.

Negro Pioneers: Booker T. Washington

Virginia (VA), West Virginia (WV), Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Tuskegee, AL, Richmond, VA, Massachusetts (MA)

Lucille A. Chambers tells the story of Booker T. Washington's rise in society from his birth in Virginia to his founding of the Tuskegee Institute and the Negro Business League.

Letter from Students of Southern Africa to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA, New York (NY)

Students from South Africa write Dr. King to express their concerns regarding the United States' diplomatic relations with the Republic of South Africa.

Letter from Samuel Kirk to President Johnson

Friday, December 30, 1966
Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Mr. Kirk, Director of the Institute for Research on Exceptional Children, writes to President Johnson expressing his desire for peace in Vietnam. Kirk suggests that Johnson appoint a Peace Commission consisting of Dr. King and others to help create solutions for ending the war.

SNCC - SCLC Alabama Staff Meeting

Friday, January 28, 1966
Alabama (AL)

Randolph Blackwell updates Andrew Young of the recent SCLC and SNCC joint meeting intended to resolve any conflicts between the two organizations and their initiatives within the state of Alabama. The mounting tension between the two civil rights organizations is attributed to the rise of Black Panther Party chapters throughout the South, a phenomenon from which SCLC intends to distance itself.

Forgiveness

Dr. King provides several definitions of the word forgiveness according to several outside references.

Letter from Eric McRae to MLK

Sunday, March 11, 1962
California (CA), Selma, AL

Eric McRae, a fourth grade student from Lincoln School, writes to Dr. King for his efforts to promote voter registration with the Freedom Marches in Selma, Alabama.

Highlander Reports: Black Power in Mississipi

Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), Atlantic City, NJ, Michigan (MI), Kentucky (KY)

In this newsletter, the writers speak about various issues concerning African Americans and their discrimination in politics.

Letter from Mrs. Presley Layer to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968
Florida (FL)

As a member of the Urban League and other civic organizations, Mrs. Layer expresses her concerns about the conduct of marches verses a more militant tactic. Mrs. Layer asserts that we live in a violent nation and is concerned that violent pacifist will become uncontrollable. She concludes with informing Dr. King she is an admirer and long supporter of the SCLC.

Help For Nigeria

Saturday, March 25, 1967
New York (NY), NIGERIA

Nigeria requests help from Negro civil rights leaders such as Dr. King, Randolph, and Roy Wilkins. Nigerians feel that the hate between the government and its people will result in war.

Tonight Show Appearance Press Release

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
Washington, D.C.

The SCLC announces that Dr. King will appear on the Tonight Show with Harry Belafonte filling in for Johnny Carson as host. Comedian Nipsey Russell and actor Paul Newman, both active in the civil rights movement, will also be guests. Dr. King looks forward to this opportunity to speak about the upcoming Poor People?s Campaign.

Waste in Foreign Aid

Sunday, February 19, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), BRAZIL, Washington, D.C.

Irene M. Kashmer suggests Dr. King address the issue of wasted foreign aid in his march on Washington. She encloses a New York Times article from February 15, 1967 to emphasize her point.

World

Dr. King discusses Paul Tillich's definition of the world as a "unity of manifoldness" in "Systematic Theology."

Press Release from Edward Lamb

Friday, October 13, 1967
Ohio (OH), VIETNAM

This press release from Edward Lamb, an Ohio delegate to the 1964 Democratic National Convention, expresses his opposition to the Vietnam War and to President Lyndon Johnson, who had pledged as a candidate not to escalate the war.

Telegram from the James A. Bailey Family to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), New York (NY), New York, NY

The James A. Bailey family offers its prayers for Dr. King's recovery.