The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"South Carolina (SC)"

Letter from Eric McRae to MLK

Sunday, March 11, 1962
California (CA), Selma, AL

Eric McRae, a fourth grade student from Lincoln School, writes to Dr. King for his efforts to promote voter registration with the Freedom Marches in Selma, Alabama.

What is Man?

Sunday, January 12, 1958
Montgomery, AL

Citing views from historical and contemporary figures, Dr. King asserts that the definition of "man" lies somewhere between God and an animal. Dr. King contends that, although man is limited by time and space, humans are not animals, because they have the capacity for rational thought. However, the central theme that Dr. King argues is that humanity is inherently evil and must constantly strive for high moral standards.

Letter from A3C Johnson to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965
California (CA), Montgomery, AL

Mr. Johnson writes to Dr. King requesting a recommendation letter for reclassification. Johnson explains that he is highly affiliated and a notable person must write his recommendation.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart


Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize


As Dr. King reflects on his acceptance of the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, he draws a parallel to the American Negroes' nonviolent approach to civil rights and the people of India, Africa, and elsewhere throughout the world. King argues that "humanity's desperate need for peace and progress to move into the truly civilized world of the future" will ultimately derive from adherence to non-violence.

Telegram from Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons to MLK

Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons conveys his support to Dr. King for a statewide Mississippi boycott. Gibbons congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Notes Regarding Civil Rights Act of 1965

This handwritten note describes the positive effects of the Civil Rights Act for Negroes. According to the notes, "What we have won in blood, toil and sacrifice we will not squander in apathetic complacency."

The Nation: Fumbling on the New Frontier by MLK

Saturday, March 3, 1962
Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), INDIA, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Dr. King elaborates on a report regarding civil rights and the collective efforts with the Kennedy Administration to eradicate racial discrimination. The Executive Orders from President Kennedy are unprecedented as he is attempting to eliminate employment discrimination and has appointed Negroes to key government positions. In an effort not to move "too fast," the President's legislative programs have now commenced a pace that is parallel with the consensus. Dr.

Letter from High School Student Jeanne Adams to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963
Detroit, MI, Birmingham, AL

Joanne Adams, a student from Central High School, writes Dr. King to voice her support for what he is doing for negro citizens in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from A. Susi to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967
New York, NY

The Local 89 Chefs, Cooks, Pastry Cooks and Assistants Union of New York provided Dr. King with $100 to aid in his work for equality.

Letter from FLING Unifie to MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

Mauricio Gregorio Okatha describes to Dr. King the harsh conditions and struggles of the people in Portuguese, Guinea in their fight for freedom. Mr. Okatha requests the SCLC’s assistance in sending medication and clothing for their soldiers, who are wounded and fighting in rags.


Dr. King quotes theologian Reinhold Niebuhr on his perception of sin. Niebuhr discusses the creativity and uniqueness of man with his relation to God.

Dr. King Sermon Rough Draft - "Man Incurably Religious"

The document, shown here, is a rough draft of sermon notes, prepared by Dr. King, under the title "Man Incurably Religious." The exact timeframe, of this sermon draft, is unknown. Dr. King, in this draft, puts the spotlight on examples such as a baby's attachment to a mother, a flower's direction toward the sun and the flight pattern of a pigeon. He used a quotation of St. Augustine that said, "We come forth from God and we shall be homesick until we return to him."

Unwise and Untimely?

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, New Orleans, LA, New York (NY), Texas (TX), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

Letter from Reverend Robert Jacoby to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963
New Jersey (NJ)

Reverend Robert Jacoby informs Dr. King that his Letter From Birmingham Jail was used in the Sunday worship service sermon.

Letter from MLK to Carmen Baptista


Dr. King writes Carmen Baptista expressing deep appreciation for his letter of encouragement and for sending a recording of his song, "Coming Down the Road."

People In Action: A Profound Moral..Continued

Saturday, August 3, 1963

Dr. King challenges the Negro church and its leadership to uphold the morals of the community. He insists that clergymen must speak out guardedly to obtain support.

Tillich's Method

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “The Protestant Era.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Letter from Paul R. Davis to MLK

Friday, June 23, 1967
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Paul R. Davis, Minister at First Congregational Church of Webster Groves, writes Dr. King regarding an interview between Dr. King and Father Daniel Lyons, S. J. about the connection between Vietnam and the need for US federal poverty program funding. Davis requests any material to "clarify critical interpretations" that may have been perceived by the interview.

Letter from Robert L. Martin to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964
Texas (TX), Dallas, TX, Atlanta, GA

Dr. Robert L. Martin, Associate Professor of History at Texas Christian University, invites Dr. King to come speak to the university.

Telegram from the Faculty of Howard University School of Law to MLK

Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

The faculty of Howard University's Law School offers to assist Dr. King in the fight against social injustice in Alabama.

Letter from Saifuddin Ahmed to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1966

Saifuddin Ahmed writes on behalf of the East Pakistan Student Union inviting Dr. King to speak at their 10th Provincial Conference. The students also express their admiration for Dr. King's dedication and leadership to human rights worldwide.

Wieman's Empirician

Dr. King records a quote from religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman's book, "The Source of Human Good" on the impossibility of knowing final outcomes.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Reverend Terrell

Friday, May 5, 1967
New York, NY

Dr.King expresses his deep appreciation to Union Baptist Church for their generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Andrew Hobart to MLK

Tuesday, November 29, 1966
Minnesota (MN)

In this letter, dated 11/29/66, Mr. Andrew Hobart, President of Ministers Life and Casualty Union informs Dr. King that his application for reinstatement has been accepted, and cautions a lapsed contract may result in a loss or reduction of benefits.

Appreciation Letter to MLK

Wednesday, August 21, 1963
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

President John F. Kennedy writes Dr. King expressing appreciation for his support during this difficult time. President Kennedy is referring to the death of his second son, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, who died two days after his birth August 7, 1963.

Letter from Edward Enyedy to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Enyedy writes to Dr. King to inform him of a mock Presidential convention sponsored by TIME Magazine and asks Dr. King for any campaign material he can provide.

Telegram from Harold Stassen to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Harold Stassen, President of the American Baptist Convention and former Minnesota Governor, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He states that Dr. King is the most deserving because he tackles the race crisis through non-violent means.

The Emergency Civil Liberties Committee Defends the Constitutional Rights

Friday, February 16, 1968
VIETNAM, New York (NY), New York, NY

ECLC writes to ask for assistance with their efforts to criminalize governmental draft tactics. As staunch supporters of the Bill of Rights and the Constitution, ECLC argues that the Draft is a violation of citizen's constitutional rights. Furthermore, they have dedicated their services to protecting the rights of youth, arguing that the draft is economically discriminatory in "student deferments". The organization challenges other civil liberties organizations to join them in this fight.

Letter from James C. Gray, M.D. to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. James Gray of Washington, D.C. encloses three checks to Dr. King for the SCLC on behalf of his reading club. He encourages Dr. King to continue in his "great works."