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"South Carolina (SC)"

Letter Dated 11/14/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Wednesday, November 14, 1962
New York (NY)

Per Dr. King's request, Ms. Dora McDonald forwards the sermon "The Man Was A Fool," to Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishing. The sermon is to be included in a forthcoming book of Dr. King's sermons.

The Commercial Appeal: But No Services

Sunday, January 7, 1968
Memphis, TN, Virginia (VA)

This photo and accompanying caption relate the story of Dr. King and an associate clerical organization conducting a silent vigil at Arlington National Cemetery after being blocked judicially from holding a memorial service in that venue.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer blames Dr. King for riots and turmoil taking place in America.

Letter from Kate Krautheimer to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), New York, NY

Kate Krautheimer informs Dr. King of an invitation from the University of Pennsylvania requesting that he address the undergraduate student body.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 26, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Joan Daves asks Dora McDonald about obtaining a copy of the speech Dr. King made to the New York City Bar Association.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968
Memphis, TN

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris write Dr. King expressing their appreciation for his role as a Civil Rights leader. They were moved to write to him after hearing him speak at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee and request to meet with him the next time he visits.

Definition of Christianity

Dr. King records a definition of Christianity. He defines Christianity as the belief in the "potential good in human nature."

Love in Action

GREECE, ISRAEL

Dr. King expounds on the love of God by referencing a verse from the Bible in the Book of Luke. The verse states, "Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do." Dr. King notes the truth of this verse is also revealed in race relation of today.

Telegram from MLK to Amsterdam News

New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL

Dr. King delivers an informative telegram to James Hicks, editor of Amsterdam News, regarding the current SCLC initiative to launch a civil rights campaign in Chicago, Illinois. The movement will direct its efforts towards school integration and eradicating the social ills that plague the Northern ghettos. Dr. King asserts "if the problems of Chicago, the Nation's second largest city, can be solved, they can be solved everywhere."

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Boulware

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Mrs. Boulware of Newark, New Jersey expresses her sympathy for Mrs. Coretta Scott King after the death of Dr. King. Boulware mentions that she was one of Dr. King's supporters and was a participant in the March on Washington. She closes by stating that Dr. King "is not dead, he is only resting."

Reason

Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Bible regarding reason.

Letter from Harriet Meyers to Benjamin Nelson

Thursday, December 15, 1966
Chicago, IL, London, England, Illinois (IL)

Ms. Meyers writes to Judge Nelson dissatisfied with the way he conducts trials, especially in her situation of a malpractice suit. She requests plastic surgery to correct the erroneous surgery.

Letter from MLK to Mr. C.G. Christian

Wednesday, August 22, 1962
Birmingham, AL

Dr. King sends this letter of recommendation, on behalf of Reverend John Thomas Porter, to the Pulpit Committee of Sixth Avenue Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Following the death of Dr. Goodgame, Dr. King nominates without reservation, Reverend Porter who he calls, "one of the finest men on the ministerial horizon."

Northern District of Mississippi Court Order

Tuesday, November 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

District Court Judge Claude F. Clayton for Mississippi, issues an order sustaining part of the motion for supplemental relief on behalf of minor plaintiffs, Sharper T. Cunningham and Darlene Cunningham vs. Grenada Municipal Separate School District of Mississippi.

Man

Dr. King interprets Psalm 90, which he explains discusses the transience of man as compared to God.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Transition Period

Dr. King quotes an unknown source that links the transition period to Alfred North Whitehead’s rejection of his earlier view about science and philosophy.

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, August 15, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Georgia Attorney General Eugene Cook regrets that Dr. King has refused to reveal the names of individuals affiliated with Communist activities throughout the United States. Mr. Cook states that he will continue to investigate the file on his own accord.

Letter from Edna Hedrick to MLK

Sunday, November 8, 1964
Michigan (MI)

Edna Hedrick, writing on behalf of the Ypsilanti, MI, branch of the NAACP, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from Thich Nhat Hanh to MLK

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, Denver, CO, Colorado (CO)

Thich Nhat Hanh expresses his support for Dr. King and conveys his desire to meet with Dr. King during his upcoming visit to Atlanta.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Johann R. Goelz

Friday, August 16, 1963
Milwaukee, WI, Wisconsin (WI), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Johann Goelz expressing his appreciation for the kind remarks shared in a previous correspondence. King hopes that the current work in Birmingham will yield a success that sets the tone for better race relations in the South.

Letter from Clara Sturges Johnson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963
California (CA)

Ms. Johnson informs Dr. King of her efforts promoting the passing of the "Kennedy Civil Rights Memorial Act." The United States Congress would go on to pass this act in 1964.

SCLC Report: Operation Breadbasket

Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), Kentucky (KY), Virginia (VA), Louisiana (LA), Florida (FL), South Carolina (SC)

Rev. Fred C. Bennette, Jr. writes a report on Operation Breadbasket. Rev. Bennette "hopes to increase its activity in alleviating the economic plight of the Negro in America." At the culmination of the report, he lists the main cities where the project will be implemented.

Telegram from UFT President Albert Shanker to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Albert Shanker expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for his support throughout the tumultuous 1967 education crisis in New York City.

Bogalusa

Virginia (VA), Louisiana (LA)

Antoinette McNally retells the story of a Negro man who was brutally murdered for the alleged rape of a white woman. McNally shares that the story has been kept silenced for forty-six years.

Letter from Ronald Segal to MLK

Sunday, October 10, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), London, England, South Africa

Mr. Segal expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's willingness to sponsor the International Conference on South Africa. He also requests that Dr. King prepare a short paper to deliver at the Conference.

Letter from Edris Head to MLK about Mormans and the Presidential Election

Saturday, May 20, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, Mrs. Head conveys to Dr. King her opinion of potential presidential candidate George Romney while criticizing the Mormon clergy and their road to priesthood. Additionally, Mrs. Head compares Dr. King to Gandhi and Jesus.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
DENMARK, Stockholm, Sweden, VIETNAM

Peggy Duff invites Dr. King to speak in Copenhagen on behalf of the Danish Peace Movement.

Letter from Sampson Oliver to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Sampson Oliver writes Dr. King expressing his feelings concerning the immoral notion of Vietnam War.