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Letter from Joan Daves to Andrew Young

Friday, April 21, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Daves focuses on Dr. King's speeches and discusses copyrighting issues.

Letter from Mildred Maroney to MLK about a Donation

Thursday, May 11, 1967

In this letter Mildred Maroney of the Brookings Institute forwards a donation which was an honorarium due to Mr. Robinson Hollister. This was done because Mr. Hollister requested that the honorarium be donated to the SCLC on his behalf.

Statement on the Indictment of MLK

Thursday, March 3, 1960

The "Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr." issued this statement, accusing the state of Alabama of falsely distorting Dr. King's 1958 income tax return in an attempt to indict him.

Letter from MLK to Society of Brothers

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Dr. King thanks the Society of Brothers for its recent donation to the SCLC and explains why the donation is important to the work and needs of the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Blicksilver

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

Dr. King thanks Blicksilver for his contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges the impact of such support in improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Winfred P. Buckwalter III to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Buckwater enclose a check for $500.00 that is intended to assist Dr. King in his efforts to stop the Vietnam conflict and help establish world peace.

Letter from Edna Patricia Mildred Smith to MLK

Edna Smith, a high school senior, expresses her admiration to Dr. King and his works. She informs of the low ranking she received at a speech contest and asks him to prepare a ten-minute speech for their state contest. She also seeks his advice regarding her academic plans after high school.

Letter from MLK Regarding SCLC

Friday, October 1, 1965

In this letter, King discusses the importance of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. SCLC will continue their major work in the South, but will also respond to the calls of the North. He goes on to state that financial and moral support is always appreciated, and by a small contribution one could be part of "America's most imperative moral and social mission."

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

In order to protect citizens involved in voter registration from attacks and harassment by police, Dr. King requests that President Kennedy intervene the situation in Greenwood, Mississippi.

Letter from John W. Vannorsdall to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

John W. Vannorsdall, Chaplain of Gettysburg College, invites Dr. King to come speak at the college located in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Letter from James Allen to MLK

Wednesday, April 6, 1966

James Allen expresses his opinion of the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Letter from Robert Harris to SCLC

Thursday, June 17, 1965

Mr. Harris offers the SCLC assistance from the Michigan Chapter of the Law Students Civil Rights Research Council to research civil rights problems.

Letter from LeRoy Collins of the U.S. Department of Commerce

The Director of Communtiy Relations Service for the U.S. Department of Commerce, LeRoy Collins, offers their partnership and support to the National Assembly on Progress in Eaquality of Opportunity in Housing and the National College Student Conference on Freedom of Residence. Each conference addresses the issue of discrimination; inequalitiesof residence and citizenship at the community level.

Letter from Corinne B. Hill and Harold Stassen to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 12, 1967

Harold Stassen correspond with Dora McDonald expressing gratitude for a letter sent a few days earlier. The letter involves a book to be written by Dr. King.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to the Harris Family

Dr. and Mrs. King send condolences to Katie Harris upon the passing of Alphonso. The Kings remembered Alphonso as "a great and dedicated worker in the struggle for freedom and human dignity."

Draft of Speech for SCLC in Nashville

Dr. King is outlining a speech he later presented to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Nashville.

Invitation from C.W. De Kiewiet to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Cornell William De Kieweit invites Dr. King to speak as the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecturer at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Mr. De Kieweit explains the civil rights struggle in South Africa and explains that Dr. King's appearance would be of great help.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Friday, April 28, 1967

Robert F. Kennedy writes to Dr. King regarding his recent trip to Mississippi. Kennedy tells of his engagement with the Department of Agriculture and the Subcommittee on Employment in efforts to help relieve the present hunger crisis. The focus is "to provide more and better food" to people with low income or no income at all. He also wants the committee and Congress to pay close attention to this subject and encourages an analysis of the food stamp system.

Letter from MLK to Chris Folker of Sweden

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Chris Folcker's support and hospitality during his trip to Sweden. He also shares his satisfaction with the unique reaction of Mr. Folcker's organization.

Letter from Berta Reller to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967

Berta Reller writes a letter to Dr. King regarding an article she has enclosed. The letter discusses recent riots and that extremists from the left and right wings are motivating them. Reller believes that there should be more focus on education.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Letter from Marion Hoyt to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1961

Marian Hoyt, manager of the Winsor School's Senior Play, writes Dr. King, providing him a donation on the behalf of the school in Boston. The writer cites specifically appreciation for Dr. King's "work in Montgomery."

Letter from House Speaker John W. McCormack to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967

Massachusetts Democratic Congressman and Speaker of the House John W. McCormack thanks Dr. King for a recent telegram and agrees with the views Dr. King expressed.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."

Invitation from Hermon Dilmore to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Representing the American Baptist Men, Director, Hermon C. Dilmore makes acquaintance with Dr. King via mutual friend, J.C. Herrin, Assistant General Secretary of the American Baptist Convention. Mr. Dilmore invites Dr. King to stop by the American Baptist Men's booth at the Convention in Pittsburgh. Furthermore, he invites attendance of at least one family from Dr. King's church to the 24th Annual National Conference at the American Baptist Assembly in Green Lake, Wisconsin.

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

Monday, May 24, 1965

Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.

Draft of MLK's An Open Letter to Negro Youth

In an open letter to Negro Youths, Dr. King urges them to stay committed to the nonviolent principles of social change in their plight to gain broad access to education and employment.

Letter from Autieve Smith of Revelation Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, August 25, 1964

Autieve Smith writes on behalf of Revelation Baptist Church to express their happiness in Dr. King's acceptance in being a part of their program with the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights Choir. Smith informs Dr. King of the time and place of his address and asks that he provide the committee with the needed information to plan his accommodations.

Spirit of Law[s]

Dr. King summarizes “The Spirit of the Laws,” written by Montesquieu, a political philosopher of the Enlightenment period.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Hassell

Dr. King addresses Mrs. Hassell's questions regarding Pope Paul's quest for peace.