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Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

Saturday, August 1, 1964

In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Statement by MLK

Dr. King discusses the backlash received during the protests and demonstrations for civil rights. He asserts that nonviolence is the most successful weapon, and that in order to participate the individual must be bold, brave, and disciplined.

Greek Philosophy Subject Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King points to the aim of Greek Philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Letter from Pat Carter to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Dr. King receives a letter from Miss Pat Carter, the public relations director at Katz Radio, thanking him for his address regarding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Faith"

In this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "Faith," Dr. King writes out some thoughts on the subject.

Letter from Thomas K. Gilhool to MLK

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

The Fellowship House in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania invites Dr. King to be a speaker at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney for her 35 years of service as Director.

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, March 4, 1968

This is the SCLC financial report for the week of March 4 through March 8, 1968. Income, disbursements, and bank balances from several banks are included in this document. Expenses from organizational projects, such as Voter Registration, the Washington Project and Operation Breadbasket, are also documented. A list of priorities and outstanding debts conclude the report.

Copyright Agreement for MLK’s Nobel Lecture

This is the Copyright Assignment Agreement established between Dr. King and the Nobel Foundation.

Letter from Bible Student to MLK

The bible student who wrote this letter used biblical references to justify segregation and to persuade Dr. King to cease civil rights demonstrations.

Letter from Roger Threats to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Roger Threats, a student from New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King death. In the letter, Threats describes his own dream, which is an end to fighting.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson writes Dr. King to inform him of the upcoming "Negro Spiritual Singing Convention" in Greenville, South Carolina. Mr. Culbertson explains that the previous occasion was so successful that he has decided to sponsor a similar event with the aspiration that it will be bigger than the last. He requests Dr. King's help in advertising for the Convention and indicates in postscript that he would appreciate it if Dr. King could send a representative as he did before.

Stride Towards Freedom Royalties

Sunday, July 25, 1965

This document serves as a financial receipt from Laurence Pollinger Ltd. Royalties for Dr. King's book Stride Towards Freedom are included in the statement.

To Earn a Living: The Right of Every American

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Frederick B. Abramson, the assistant to Clifford Alexander, Jr. sends this copy of President Johnson's "To Earn a Living: the Right of Every American." Alexander, the chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, in cooperation with the White House, had this message circulated to the Congress of the United States. President Johnson's message urges Congress to assist with creating jobs and providing access to job training to all Americans regardless of race or socioeconomic status.

Letter from Carey B. Preston to MLK

Friday, August 28, 1964

Carey Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, thanks Dr. King for being the public meeting speaker at their convention.

Letter from Edmond G. Jeffries to MLK

Sunday, January 27, 1963

Edmond G. Jeffries writes Dr. King after hearing him speak at the Chicago Sunday Evening Club. Jeffries states, "The injustices that the white man has visited on the colored man for hundreds of years burns my soul." Jeffries expresses that he only wants to be a Christian.

James H. Halsey Writes MLK About Alumni Solicitation

Friday, March 15, 1963

James H. Halsey writes Dr. King about financial support for the University of Bridgeport and its program.

Letter from Ethel T. Elsea to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

Ethel Elsea, Assistant Editor at the Fleming H. Revell Company, requests Dr. King's permission to use a quotation for a book by Frank S. Mead.

MLK Statement on Voter Registration

Dr. King urges the African American community to register and vote. He outlines the importance of voting by making historcial references relevant to the community.

Letter from Mrs. Ray Mitchell to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963

Mrs. Ray Mitchell constructs this thoughtful letter to Dr. King thanking him not only for sending her a copy of his book, "Strength to Love," but also for his diligence as a clergyman.

Letter from James R. Cary to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964

A representative from the Southwest Wisconsin Education Association invites Dr. King to serve as the keynote speaker at the organization's annual convention. The executive secretary tells Dr. King that they are interested in his "experience with education in the south and the entire United States," and feel that he would greatly enhance the convention by delivering the keynote speech. The sender also congratulates Dr. King on his recent "Man of the Year" honor by Time Magazine.

SCLC Pamphlet of Articles in Rebuttal of MLK's Critics

Andrew Young, the National Executive Director of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, issued this pamphlet entitled "Does Martin Luther King, Jr. Have the Right? The Qualifications? The Duty? To Speak Out on Peace?" The pamphlet features several editorials written in defense of Dr. King that were published in the New York Times, Detroit Free Press, New York Post, and the Nation in April 1967. The pamphlet includes a statement saying the SCLC's primary focus is civil rights but they support Dr. King's right to speak his opinion regarding the Vietnam War.

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

Letter from Fran to Dr. & Mrs. King

Fran writes Dr. and Mrs. King to thank them for their hospitality during her stay at their home.

Letter from A3C Johnson to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965

Mr. Johnson writes to Dr. King requesting a recommendation letter for reclassification. Johnson explains that he is highly affiliated and a notable person must write his recommendation.

Telegram from Chaim Potok to Andrew J. Young

Tuesday, May 11, 1965

Reverend Andrew J. Young informs Rabbi Chaim Potok that his heavy involvement in the South will not permit him to engage in any writing.

A Statement to the South and the Nation

The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement to the nation regarding the unresolved problems of civil rights. The leaders asked for all Negroes, particularly those in the South, to assert their human dignity and to seek justice by rejecting all injustices.

Letter from Charles Henry to Ralph David Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Mr. Henry chastises Rev. Abernathy for an adverse comment he made towards White people. As a negro, he urges that the only way to get White people to stop name calling names is for Negroes to do the same.

DeWolf, Harold

Dr. King references Harold DeWolf's book, "A Theology of the Living Church."

The Dexter Echo: Not Guilty!

Wednesday, June 8, 1960

This article states that Dr. King was found not guilty for tax evasion charges. The state's tax agent refused to lie under oath or allow prejudice to sway the facts.

Dr. King Announces Appointment of Director of New SCLC Project to Train Urban Negro Leaders

Wednesday, January 10, 1968

In a press release, Dr. King announces Rev. T.Y. Rogers as the Director of the Negro ministerial training, a project created by the SCLC. The purpose of this program is to provide training seminars for ministers, which will ultimately assist congregational members with employment, economic development, voter registration, and education.