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City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

Sunday, September 3, 1967

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

Letter from Mrs. A. P. Boynton to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Mrs. A.P, Boynton, chairman of the Dallas County Voters League, informs Dr. King of unjust treatment towards colored women employed at Dunn's Rest Home. Due to physical abuse from the rest home's owner Charles E. Dunn, many of the women left. The Dallas County Voters League also requests a sewing machine from Dr. King to assist the women with "gainful employment."

Letter from C.A. Echols to MLK

Thursday, July 1, 1965

C.A. Echols requests a copy of Dr. King's publication "The Time for Freedom Has Come" to be included in his upcoming thesis "Thoreau and Civil Disobedience."

Letter to Mr. Otwell from Dr. King Regarding the Request for an Article for the Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, March 30, 1964

Dr. King informs Mr. Otwell that, due to prior obligations, he will not be able to write the article for the Sunday edition as requested. However, he assures Mr. Otwell that he will look into the possibility of editing a section of "Why We Can't Wait" to be published instead.

Letter from Donald Prince to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Donald Prince wrote this letter the day after Dr. King's assassination and addressed it to Mrs. King.

Letter from George W. Jones to MLK

Friday, December 30, 1966

George W. Jones, of the National Education Association, invites Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at an event honoring Negro History Week in Washington, DC.

Letter from Maude to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958

Maude extends her wishes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King, following a stabbing in New York. She assures him that she is holding down the fort and provides him with a breakdown of correspondences that he has received.

Letter of Gratitude from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967

In this letter, Maurice A. Dawkings, the Assistant Director for Civil Rights, expresses gratitude for the work Dr. King does.

Deism

Dr. King defines "deism" as a concept developed by a group of English and French religious thinkers who "interpreted God purely in terms of natural order" during the 17th and 18th century.

Worship

Dr. King critiques the Protestant Church worship services.

Predestination

Dr. King defines predestination.

Letter from MLK to Douglas A.C. Davis

Friday, December 13, 1963

Dr. King informs Douglas A. C. Davis that due to his current commitments, he will be unable to accept Davis' invitation to speak at the University of Western Ontario during the current academic year.

Broadside Regarding Julia Brown's Speech on MLK's Communist Connections

This broadside advertises a speech to be given by former FBI agent Julia Brown. Brown was to speak on the alleged communist connections of Dr. King.

Letter from Harry Walker to Dora McDonald

Monday, September 25, 1967

Harry Walker writes Dora McDonald regarding contracts for Dr. King's future speaking engagements.

The Crisis in America's Cities

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Dr. King provides an analysis of "social disorder" and a plan of action against poverty, discrimination and racism in Urban America. Dr. King states that, "If the soul is left in darkness, sins will be committed."

Letter from Dora McDonald to J. Sackmann

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

Ms. McDonald invites Sackmann's students on behalf of Dr. King to visit his office and speak with his executives.

Letter of Support to SCLC from SAVE

Friday, July 7, 1967

Gladys Weekes states that she and her fellow members of the Southern Assistant Volunteer Effort (SAVE) are happy to again support the SCLC.

Letter from Alice Sargent to MLK

Wednesday, November 13, 1963

Alice Sargent, the Assistant Director of Student Activities at Temple University, inquires what role the students can play in the Civil Rights Movement and sends a sample of one of the students' editorials.

Letter from MLK to Gilbert J. Clark

Saturday, May 21, 1966

Dr. King informs Gilbert J. Clark, Chairman at the Law School Forum, that he is unable to speak in Edmonton under the auspices of the Alberta Law School Forum during his trip to Canada.

Letter from Polly M. Williams to Whom it May Concern

Sunday, January 29, 1967

Polly Williams, a former counselor of the Neighborhood Youth Corps, requests a full investigation of its director, Mr. Pace. Mrs. Williams requested a sick leave while undergoing surgery, yet later discovered that her request had counted as vacation time. She discusses numerous orders she received from Mr. Pace that negatively impacted her health and her recovery from surgery. She believes that she is a victim of racial discrimination in the workplace.

Cover of the Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter

Monday, March 1, 1965

The cover of Iowa's Catholic Interracial Council announces that Dr. King will be the recipient of the 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. The awards banquet is held in Davenport, Iowa.

"Where Do We Go From Here?" Asks Negro King

Thursday, February 1, 1968

In this article, Palmer Van Gundy reviews Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." He calls the book a must for all Americans, naming Dr. King not just the greatest civil rights leaders, but also a "leader for peace with freedom and justice."

War Paint Note Card

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on war paint. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, June 2, 1967

Ms. Badeker informs Dora McDonald that three copies of a contract with Econ Verlag are enclosed. She instructs that Dr. King is to sign and return the copies in order to further the German-language rights to "Where Do We Go from Here?"

Letter from Annie L. Cook to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Annie Cook asks Dr. King to make a speech at a program sponsored by the Greenbrier County branch of the NAACP. She predicts that the program will be informative and improve communication between Negros and whites.

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Martha Kennedy thanks Dr. King for sending her a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Kennedy feels that Dr. King's leadership is well emphasized in the context of the book. Particularly, she finds the chapter on Black Power to be "valuable." Mrs. Kennedy hopes for much success to Dr. King and his great work.

NAIRO Supports March for Freedom

The National Association of Intergroup Relations Officials declares their support of the March for Freedom in Washington, D.C. NAIRO urges its members to support the march for the integration of over "20,000,000 Americans of minority identity."

Letter from A High School Student

A white high school student writes Dr. King to encourage the continuation of demonstrations to free the Negro people.

Letter from MLK to Edwin and Louise Flowers

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

In this correspondence to Mr. Edwin C. and Mrs. Louise M. Flowers from Dr. King, he wanted to personally thanked Mr. Edwin and Mrs. Flowers for their generous contribution to SCLC and to express his appreciation and gratitude for their support toward the Civil Right Movement.

Statement by MLK in San Francisco

Tuesday, May 26, 1964

Dr. King gives an address in San Francisco regarding race relations, equality, and segregation. Dr. King charges people from all communities to unite so that hope can be created for others.