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"Southern Christian Leadership Conference"

Condolence Letter to Coretta Scott King from Lyman G. Farrar

In this letter Mr. Farrar writes, "Dr. King symbolized for me the celebrant of the century in terms of newness of life in Jesus Christ." With a deep sense of gratitude he reveals the indelible affect Dr. King had on his life and his ministry, as a white middle class male.

Schleiermacher & Ritschl

Dr. King writes notes regarding the philosophies of German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl. King states there is a mixture of attraction and repulsion between the two, as Ritschl is repelled by Schleiermacher's mysticism and attracted to his views on Christianity.

Letter from the Dutch Vietnam Committee to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967

An unknown author writes Dr. King on behalf of the Dutch Vietnam Committee to seek assistance in stopping the bombing in Vietnam. The committee requests Dr. King record a few powerful remarks which will hopefully influence ending the war.

Letter from New York City Mayor to MLK

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

The Mayor of New York, John V. Lindsay, invites Dr. King to a conference entitled "Puerto Ricans Confront the Problems of the Complex Urban Society: A Design for Change." Panel meetings will expound on twelve subjects ranging from "Education" to the "Administration of Justice."

Notes about Books

Dr. King opposes the existence of books that degrade the Negro image and falsely contribute to a "national brainwashing." He cites quotations from novelist John Steinbeck, which discourse on the "sacred" nature of a book.

Telegram from Hosea Williams to President Johnson

Tuesday, August 3, 1965

Hosea Williams writes to President Lyndon B. Johnson requesting an investigation of the Andy Whatley murder.

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Statement by Albert A. Raby

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Albert A. Raby releases a statement denouncing the Illinois State Senate for rejecting an equal housing bill. Mr. Raby calls for a tent-in and rally at the construction site for the proposed Weston plant. Raby cites Illinois is in violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and that federal funding for the Weston Project be terminated.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles E. Boddie

Friday, February 17, 1961

Dora McDonald informs Charles Boddie that Dr. King cannot accept any speaking engagements for his desired date because he has previously committed to having lunch with some students and faculty.

Letter from William Perkins to MLK

This letter comes from a military inmate who makes claim to Dr. King of mistreatment and unjust imprisonment. Private William Perkins requests the assistance of Dr. King prior to writing to his congressman to complain of abuse and a lack of proper medical care.

International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace

Thursday, December 15, 1966

Kenneth Lee, President of the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace, asks Dr. King if he would consider becoming a sponsor for the organization.

Letter from MLK to AJ Muste

After considerable thought and prayer, Dr. King informs the recipients of this letter of his decision to travel to the Soviet Union under the sponsorship of the American Baptist Convention. He conveys his sense of duty as a Negro leader to speak to Baptists in Russia.

Letter from Mildred R. Morris to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, August 27, 1963

Mildred R. Morris acknowledges receipt of a letter from Dora McDonald. She expresses her excitement regarding the possibility of meeting and informs McDonald about her new rates as a Professional Placement Counselor.

Postcard from Jacksonville Beach

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This postcard to Dr. King requesting an autograph is one printed by the Jacksonville Beach, Florida Chamber of Commerce.

MLK Discusses Plans for the 1963 March on Washington

Wednesday, January 23, 1963

While in Detroit, Michigan, Dr. King discloses his intentions for the upcoming March on Washington.

Letter from James P. Dixon of Antioch College to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

James P. Dixon, President of Antioch College, thanks Dr. King for accepting an invitation to speak at the school's commencement ceremony.

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

Maynard Gertler, of Harvest House Limited Publishers, informs Dr. King that he was able to obtain a copy of one of his speeches and his correct mailing address.

Telegram from MLK to the Fairmont Hotel

Saturday, September 16, 1967

Dr. King writes to the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco California, requesting a reservation of two single rooms.

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr's views on God as outlined in "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Sunday, January 22, 1956

This is a church program for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in early 1956. As Pastor, Dr. King gave a sermon on "Redirecting Our Missionary Zeal."

Letter from Mose Pleasure, Jr. to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1968

Mr. Pleasure writes Dr. King to inform him of his decision not to accept employment with SCLC. He refers to an earlier visit with Dr. King and friends in Atlanta, and comments that the group's enthusiasm bodes well for the upcoming Poor People's March on Washington.

Letter from Rachelle Horowitz to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Administrative Secretary for the A. Phillip Randolph Institute, Rachelle Horowitz apologizes to Dora McDonald for an apparent misunderstanding regarding pamphlet pricing.

Letter from Karen Goldberg to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963

Karen Goldberg, a twelve-year-old in a religious school, requests some biographical information about Dr. King for a group project.

MLK Interview with Glenn E. Smiley

Thursday, March 1, 1956

This early (1956) interview with Dr. King has as its center the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in Dr. King's career and the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Charles Webber to MLK

Charles Webber, the AFL-CIO's representative for religious relations, sends this telegram of support to Dr. King during his incarceration.

Letter from Joseph A. Scahill to Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Following Dr. King's assassination, Minister Joseph Scahill sent this letter of sympathy to Mrs. King. Minister Scahill mentioned, briefly, his participation in the 1965 Selma campaign with Dr. King and vowed to continue such work.

God

Dr. King quotes Donald M. Baillie's "God Was in Christ."

Correspondence to Dr. King from Chuck Wallis, 11/15/1962

Thursday, November 15, 1962

Chuck Wallis, of Keuka College in New York, wrote to Dr. King at the request of Melvin Arnold an executive at Harper and Rowe Publishing Company. In the letter Wallis informs Dr. King of his editing responsibilities for a forthcoming book project highlighting Dr. King's sermons and requests a face to face meeting to discuss revisions.

The Philosophy of Life Undergirding Christianity and The Christian Ministry

In this essay fragment from his Crozer Seminary days, Dr. King writes that Christianity is a value philosophy whose values are embodied in the life of Christ. He begins to spell out what those values are. The first, King states, is the value of the world as something positive and life-affirming, in contrast to the negative view of the world of the ascetics and religions of India. The second value is that of persons, who have supreme worth. People must be used as ends, never as means to ends, although there have been periods in history where Christianity has fallen short.