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Letter from Charles C. Diggs Jr. to the General Motors Corporation

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

In this letter, Congressman Charles Diggs of Michigan asks Mr. Louis Seaton of General Motors for his comments in regards to automobile dealerships. The Congressman then points out that General Motors is the only one of the "Big 3" automobile companies that has not taken initiative in having a Negro franchise holder.

Letter from Rev. C. J. Bell to Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

Rev. C. J. Bell, the Editor in Chief of the Alexandria News Leader and pastor of the Progressive Baptist Church, wrote this letter to Dr. Ralph David Abernathy expressing his support following Dr. King's assassination. Abernathy was named Dr. King's successor as president of the SCLC and Bell wishes to offer his help if he can be of service.

Invitation from Aubrey T. Edwards to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Aubrey T. Edward, President of the Oakville Branch for the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to make an address during the organizations designated Human Rights year.

Letter from G. Merrill Lenox to MLK

Friday, April 19, 1963

G. Merrill Lenox, Executive Director for the Metropolitan Detroit Council of Churches, informs Dr. King he is being remembered and in the daily prayers of thousands during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Advice for Living

Dr. King addresses questions in the "Advice for Living" column published in Ebony Magazine on February 12, 1958.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding the "Times"

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, provided a detailed advertisement schedule for his latest book "Why We Can't Wait." Advertisements appeared in the Times, Harper, The Atlantic, Christian Herald and the Christian Century to name a few.

Letter from Sevy Powell to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

evy Powell expresses her view that President Johnson has done more for Negroes than President Kennedy did and Robert Kennedy or Sen. Eugene McCarthy can do because of his ability to influence Congress.

Sacrifice

Dr. King explains that Isaiah 1:11 means God can’t be appeased by sacrifice but demands righteous living.

Getting Caught in the Negative

Dr. King references the Book of Acts regarding his sermon "Getting Caught in the Negative." King asserts, "Don't get bogged down in the negative. Christianity must forever offer to the world a dynamic positive."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Bill Green

Friday, August 2, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Bill Green that Dr. King is on an extended lecture tour at the moment. She ensures Mrs. Green that the letter and poem sent will receive his attention upon his return.

Invitation to SCLF Celebration from MLK

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

Dr. King sent this telegram to 30 prominent members of the Philedelphia community, inviting them to join the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation in presenting the Star for Freedom to Harry Belafonte, Aretha Franklin, and Signey Poitier.

Letter from Ellen G. Clarke to MLK about Information Request

Thursday, February 15, 1968

In this letter, Ellen Clarke, a student at St. Andrews College in North Carolina, requests the opportunity to meet with Dr. King and gather information about the SCLC, which she will then use in a school panel on religion and politics.

New Wine in Old Bottles

Sunday, January 2, 1966

In a New Year's sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Dr. King addresses Matthew 9:17. His explains that new ideas or inspiration cannot thrive in closed minds or old structures, such as the idea of equality in a segregated society. While Victor Hugo's "idea whose time has come" may be here, Dr. King says, we need to "help time" and overcome the initial resistance to new ideas with persistence and a transformation of the old structures.

Letter from MLK to Robert L. Pino

Thursday, November 29, 1962

Dr. King writes to newly appointed Chairman of the Civil Rights Committee of New York Local Union 2603, Robert Pino, regarding the first anniversary of the Albany Movement.

Letter from Erma Jewell Hughes to MLK

Wednesday, February 12, 1964

Erma Jewell Hughes writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize award and cover on Time Magazine as "Man of the Year." Hughes invites the Reverend to speak at the Business College's annual commencement and encloses traveling expenses for the event. Hughes also states that they are raising additional funds to go towards the "Freedom Fight."

Letter from Brown University Charles A. Baldwin to MLK

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

Charles Baldwin of Brown University asks Dr. King about his travel plans and materials needed for Dr. King's upcoming sermon at the university. He also invites Dr. King to a dinner and luncheon during his visit.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe, associate of literary agent Joan Daves, encloses royalties for Dr. King's French edition of "Strength to Love".

Letter from Charles R. Bell Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, November 23, 1966

Mr. Bell inquires about a prisoner who was beaten to death in his home state of Alabama.

Suffering

Dr. King quotes and comments on Shakespeare's "Henry V."

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Monday, February 24, 1964

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

Letter from John Mack to MLK Requesting Advice

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

In this letter, John Mack asks Dr. King for advice on selecting the proper employment position that would satisfy his desire to contribute to "the perpetuation of social change and Negro progress," while still providing economic security for him and his family.

Statement by MLK re Citizen Diplomacy

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Dr. King releases a statement that he was considering communicating by mail with the "major powers" involved in the Vietnam conflict. However; he now believes that with the changing factors of certain groups involved in the conflict, his proposed communication is no longer needed.

Chapter IV - Weiman's Conception of God

Dr. King professes his ideas and viewpoints as they relate to Henry Nelson Wieman's theology on God. Wieman, an American philosopher of Naturalistic Religion, believed that God was a natural process rather than a supernatural entity.

Telegram from Edward Daniels to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Edward Daniels extends an invitation for Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at the National Conference of Anti-Poverty Agencies.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

International Book Sales Statement for MLK

Friday, August 11, 1967

This document outllines book sales and royalties for Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter from Shirley Bird to Miss Sander

Monday, February 19, 1962

Ms. Bird discusses Dr. King's lecture appearance at the University of Texas. Dr. King's lecture was entitled "Civil Liberties and Social Action."

New York Post: A Poor Show

Thursday, October 27, 1966

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

Letter from Ada M. Field to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Ada M. Field is a ninety-year-old woman who sent Dr. King her contribution for the year. Ms. Field praised Dr. King, and the SCLC, for continuing to fight for freedom and for bringing a positive light to the process.

Class Notes: Obadiah

Dr. King writes about the book of Obadiah and knowledge.