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Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Illinois (IL), Los Angeles, CA

Rev. Abernathy received this correspondence from an individual disgruntled with a California politician. The document calls for reform and amnesty for poor people in America. The author's name, in this letter, is not clearly legible.

Proposed Resolution on East-West Relations

FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, VIETNAM, CUBA

The Council for Christian Social Action of the United Church of Christ, citing President Johnson's State of the Union statement that he hopes to end the Cold War, indicates its support of government efforts to create a dialogue with the Soviet Union and other Eastern European countries. The Council asks that the Senate ratify the outer space treaty and the U.S.-Soviet consular convention and that Congress approve an East-West trade bill and lifting restrictions on the Food for Peace program.

Telegram to Governor Carl Sanders

Georgia (GA)

The SCLC writes to Georgia Governor Carl Sanders regarding the murder of Andy Whatley in Americus, GA.

Letter from P. Edward Haley to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
Washington, D.C.

P. Haley writes to express appreciation for Dr. King's works. Haley encloses copy of letter he and his wife sent to their Congressmen commending Dr. King's ideas concerning Vietnam and the riots. The Haleys are making an effort to start a nationwide campaign by encouraging their friends to write their congressman as well.

Saint Mary's Sends Invitation to MLK

Monday, November 28, 1966
Cambridge, MA, Atlanta, GA

This telegram sent to Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, requests that Dr. King make an appearance on March 12, 1967.

Manichaeism

Dr. King describes Manichaeism, a religion and philosophical doctrine that originated in Persia.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Ruth W. Carr

Friday, May 19, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King sends Mrs. Carr his condolences for the death of her husband and thanks her for her contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to John H. Bustamente

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Cleveland, OH

Chauncey Eskridge elaborates on the financial details associated with the Belafonte Benefit Concerts. He also requests some help in overcoming the deficit created by the concert.

Civil Rights Drive by SCLC and Other Groups Wins Open Housing Victory in Louisville

Saturday, December 30, 1967
Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY)

This 1967 SCLC news release details the passage of a law forbidding racial discrimination in housing in Louisville, Kentucky. It also details the role that SCLC and its sister organizations had in bring about this legislation.

Letter from MLK to Edwin D. Hoffman

Tuesday, December 29, 1964
West Virginia (WV)

Dr. King informs Dr. Edwin Hoffman of his inability to speak at the American Forum in West Virginia. Dr. King states that he will be focusing more attention to the Civil Rights and may not be available to speak at many events due to his limited schedule.

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. and Mrs. Peretz

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Andrew Young thanks Dr. and Mrs. Peretz for their hospitality during a recent concert. He also explains that the concert, which had been designed as a fundraiser for the SCLC, did not meet financial projections.

Letter from MLK to William A. Bennett Jr.

Tuesday, January 18, 1966
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King responds to a letter from William Bennett in which Bennett suggested the phrase "dark skinned American" be used to describe African Americans. Dr. King discusses the connotations of the hateful words "deeply rooted in the debilitating racist caste ordering of our society's slavery epoch and segregation era."

Letter from Gregory Ferguson to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
Virginia (VA)

Mr. Ferguson invites Dr. King to be the commencement speaker for the 1968 graduating class of Berkeley High School in Williamsburg, Virginia. The school can only afford $150 for a speaker, but he feels Dr. King's presence would make a great impact on the student body.

Letter from MLK to John Conyers

Friday, February 19, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Congressman John Conyers' visit to Selma, Alabama. Dr. King requests Congressman Conyers' support for passing federal legislation that will eliminate the barriers to a free voting process for African American citizens.

SCLC Confab Boasts Galaxy of Civil Rights Stars

Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA

The SCLC has chosen Birmingham, Alabama as the place for their Sixth Annual Convention. It includes the Annual Freedom Dinner, that will honor the top personalities identified with the Negro struggle. The convention also includes presentations from major authorities on nonviolence.

Telegram from Rev. Andrew J. Young to Mrs. Rosa M. Mcghee

Monday, August 9, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Tennessee (TN)

Rev. Andrew Young sends this telegram to Mrs. Rosa Mcghee apologizing on behalf of the SCLC for neglecting to invite the officials and members of the American Federation of Teachers.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Friday, August 30, 1957
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY

The National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower informs Dr. King of the tremendous strides made by the African American community during the elections in Sunflower County, Mississippi. Four years prior, the loss of elections by black candidates was attributed to local intimidation, but new organizational tactics provided the group with tools to combat this issue. The success of the election set a precedent for many other Mississippi counties to view voting rights as a means to change citizens' lives and the nature of the state.

Why Negroes Are Still Angry

Friday, July 1, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI, Connecticut (CT), Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

American journalist Victor Bernstein details for Redbook why Negroes are still angry in the face of the apparent success of the Civil Rights Movement. He points out that the Movement has enabled many whites to see that integration and equal rights are right, but still knowingly choose to behave as if they are wrong.

King and SCLC Meet in Montgomery

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS)

This press release announces a mass meeting held in Montgomery, Alabama by the Executive Board of SCLC. The meeting was held in response to a major libel suit against four prominent SCLC officials. Dr. King gives an address to boost morale during the course of this suit. In Dr. King's view, "The South has lost its solidity. Whites fight against whites over desegregation. Be it known, evil cannot permanently organize itself." The libel suit came to be known as the New York Times Company vs. Sullivan (1960).

Letter from T. Spurgeon Bell to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967
California (CA), Kentucky (KY)

T. Spurgeon Bell writes Dr. King to voice his concerns regarding the Civil rights movement. In his opinion the Civil Rights bill is not beneficial to the changes Dr. King seeks. He believes that such bills cannot change varying opinions on other races and asks Dr. King to alter his attempt at social change.

The Second Sunday After Easter

Sunday, April 28, 1968

The preacher begins by reminding the audience about various forms of evil, the church's mission to help humans obtain heavenly rights and other topics from the previous week's sermon. After recapping last Sunday's sermon, the preacher uses the Word of God to answer the question, "How should Christians react to the afflictions they suffer in the world?" The three answers to this question are broken up into three different sections and explained in depth by the speaker.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elizabeth Babcock

Tuesday, February 2, 1965
New York (NY), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Babcock that she received the contribution for the SCLC on behalf of Dr. King. Miss McDonald tells Mrs. Babcock that Dr. King is imprisoned in Selma, Alabama and that he will respond upon his release.

Letter from MLK to Raymond Beard

Friday, November 26, 1965
Cleveland, OH, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Raymond Beard for his statement on peace and Christianity. He believes that the Fellowship of Reconciliation can distribute Beard's message to fellow clergyman around the country. In Dr. King's view, "...we must embark upon positive programs of international aid and amity to strenghten the bonds of world community and to eliminate the conditions which historically have led nations to start wars."

Letter from Henrietta Buckmaster to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM

Henrietta Buckmaster expresses her admiration for Dr. King's stance on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Mary L. Powell to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968
Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL, Boston, MA

Mary L. Powell writes to Dr. King expressing how she has been following and considering his plans, but disproves of his methods.

Love and Forgiveness

Tuesday, May 5, 1964
New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), INDIA, St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), New Jersey (NJ)

This is a speech entitled "Love and Forgiveness" that Dr. King delivered at the American Baptist Convention meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jesus Christ and segregation serve as the major topics for this speech. Dr. King makes the compelling statements that "Jesus decided to meet hate with love," and that "segregation is still the Negro's burden and America's shame."

Telegram from the James A. Bailey Family to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), New York (NY), New York, NY

The James A. Bailey family offers its prayers for Dr. King's recovery.

Letter from James G. T. Fairfield to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967
Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

"Alive" magazine editor James G. T. Fairfield expresses gratitude to Dr. King for sending a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here." Fairfield also sends several copies of his magazine, a publication of Mennonite Broadcasting which published an excerpt of Dr. King's "Riverside" speech.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Baruch Treiger

Thursday, October 21, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks the National Women's League for its continued financial support of the SCLC.