The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"St. Augustine, FL"

MLK Index Card

Dr. King highlights James Breasted's views on Man, according to the book, "The Dawn of Conscience."

Legal Brief of Robert Greene

Robert Greene, a mixed race individual from New York, appeals his case to the Supreme Court of the United States. Greene asserts that New York investigators and police conspired to violate his civil rights by means of wrongful arrest and detention, even after his innocence became apparent. Furthermore, as Greene is recognized as indigent, his case proceeds "in forma pauperis," or without the burden of court costs and legal fees.

God (His Existence)

Dr. King quotes Alfred, Lord Tennyson's "The Ancient Sage" after posing the question, "Can we prove God's existence?"

MLK Note Card - "God"

On this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "God," Dr. King evokes an interpretation that would suggest the reverse of existentialism (existence before essence).

Letter from Rabbi Aaron Decter to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965

Rabbi Aaron Decter congratulates Dr. King on his demonstration in Montgomery and invites Dr. King to a dinner.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.

The Southern Struggle - What Can You Do?

Corretta Scott King discusses the privilege of being able to experience a great social revolution based on love and nonviolence, as inspired by the teachings of Jesus and Gandhi. She identifies Rosa Park's personal protest on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama as the beginning of the southern struggle and consequent revolution. She goes on to describe how this simple act aroused a great movement across the south, ultimately leading to the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in January of 1957.

Mixed Marriage

This illustration, created by Reg Manning, depicts Dr. King presiding over an interracial marriage between the Civil Rights Movement and "Veatnik War Protests." This drawing was published in the "Arizona Republic."

Our Struggle

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Letter From Heather Burke to the SCLC

Sunday, August 14, 1966

Heather Burke informs the SCLC of her upcoming attendance as a student at Vanderbilt University. She wishes to volunteer with the organization.

Nobel Foundation's Invitation to Dr. and Mrs. King

The Consul General of Sweden requests the presence of both Dr. and Mrs. King. The Kings are offered an invitation to meet the director of the Nobel Foundation and attend a reception in New York.

The Nation: The President has the Power - Equality Now

Saturday, February 4, 1961

Dr. King expresses his political and social sentiments concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He feels that the federal government, more specifically the President, has not taken the necessary measures to promote change in a timely manner. Dr. King suggests three main ways the President can make a greater impact. First, he advises that the President be more aggressive in the legislative arena. Secondly, he recommends that the President use "moral persuasion" as a tool to eliminate racial discrimination. Lastly, Dr.

Letter from Edward Crawford to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1963

Edward Crawford of New York encloses a quotation for Dr. King to keep in his possession. The quotation centers around individuals who continue to be slient about serious issues that matter.

Education Versus Religion

Dr. King records notes about the leadership of the intellectual and religious communities from Edwin E. Aubrey's "Present Theological Tendencies."

Letter from James D. Wyker to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

James D. Wyker writes this letter to Dr. King and encloses his proposal for direct action against the Vietnam War. Wyker questions if 60% of the population really supports President Johnson's actions in Vietnam, implying that many citizens are just neutral and not wanting to fight the status quo.

Telegram from King Children to Master Billy Watchel

Thursday, January 2, 1969

The King children thank Billy Wachtel for the Christmas gifts he sent to them.

Letter from MLK to Lillian Robertson

Friday, February 28, 1964

Dr. King apologizes for his late reply to Lillian Robertson of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship, a division of the American Baptist Convention. He informs Mrs. Robertson that he will be preaching for the American Baptist Convention as a whole, so he will be unable to speak to the Fellowship in a smaller setting.

Letter from Randolph Blackwell to Greene, Ayers, Swigert & Cluster

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Randolph T. Blackwell responds to the gentlemen of Greene, Ayers, Swiger & Cluster concerning a previous issue.

Hocking's Philosophy of the Human Self

Dr. King cites the journal "The Personalist" on William Ernest Hocking's philosophy of the human self.

Letter From Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson wrote this note to Dr. King to respectfully decline his invitation to a luncheon and to serve on the board of directors of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He states he enjoyed their last meeting and is looking forward to the next one.

Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

The Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E. Invites MLK to Appear.

Sunday, December 13, 1964

Wallace Webster, Vice President of the Tri-City Chapter of C.O.R.E., writes Dr. King inviting him to appear in the Tri-City community.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Letter from Representative James H. Scheuer to MLK

Wednesday, February 24, 1965

Congressman James Scheuer (D-New York) writes Dr. King that he believes progress is finally being made in Selma, Alabama, and he congratulations Dr. Kin on his excellent leadership.

Letter from Colin W. Bell to MLK

Tuesday, May 17, 1966

Colin W. Bell invites Dr. King to deliver a lecture during the anniversary activities of the American Friends Service Committee. This letter also includes Dora McDonald's shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Rev. Harvey H. Batos, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967

Rev. Batos Jr. expresses his support of Dr. King's political involvement despite the critisim by the New York Times.

Letter from Richard B. Specht to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Richard B. Specht requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the importance of Latin for modern day students.

The Meaning of Hope

Dr. King delivered this sermon while pastoring Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. In spite of the existence of racial injustice in America, Dr. King maintains hope for equality, and reminds the church of their responsibility to "keep the flame of hope burning."

Telegram from MLK to Rev. James Bevel

Dr. King informs Rev. Bevel of an urgent meeting with the Action Committee for Washington Mobilization at Paschal's Motel.