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Letter from Smithsonian Institution to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

S. Dillon Ripley, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, invites Dr. King to attend the bicentennial birthday celebration of the organization's founder, James Smithson.

Isaiah

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Isaiah regarding topics like ritual sacrifice, knowledge, social ethics, and the doctrine of man.

Letter from John R. Hanson to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965

Congressman Hansen of Nebraska thanks Dr. King for the telegram he sent urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Democratic Representative informs Dr. King that he was one of the 86 Congressmen "who requested a roll call vote on the issue."

Reviews of Strength to Love

These reviews of Dr. King's "Strength to Love" illustrate King's use of theological beliefs in conjunction with the struggle for civil rights reform.

God (His Existence: Psalms)

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's existence.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, June 5, 1967

In this document, President of Morehouse College, Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dora McDonald regarding receipt of a check. Mays also discusses the role he played in bringing McDonald to Atlanta.

Receipt to the Motown Record Corporation

Monday, October 3, 1966

The following receipt was issued by the SCLC to the Motown Record Corporation for their financial contribution.

Telegram from the Faculty of Howard University School of Law to MLK

The faculty of Howard University's Law School offers to assist Dr. King in the fight against social injustice in Alabama.

Letter from Maurice B. Fagan to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mr. Fagan, Executive Director of the Fellowship Commission, requests Dr. King?s suggestion for nominees for the 1967 National Fellowship Award. As a former award recipient, Dr. King's opinion and advice is highly valued.

Hints on Religious Music for Radio

This pamphlet, written by Charles Schmitz, acknowledges the impact of music on religious radio. Schmitz maintains that music helps establish the purpose of religious radio programs and that certain musical selections have the power to create Christian mood and comfort. This pamphlet gives instructions on how best to implement music.

Different Meanings of Prehension

Dr. King outlines the different meanings of "prehension" in Alfred North Whitehead's books Science and the Modern World and Process and Reality.

Letter from E. Z. Graves to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

E. Z. Graves adversely compares Dr. King, Stokely Carmicheal and Adam Clayton Powell to manure. Mr. Graves attaches an article entitled, "King and Carmicheal Maps Strategy for Summer Attacks on Big Cities."

Letters from Jeanette Allen Behre to MLKCharles. H. Behre to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Two professors of Columbia University, Dr. Jeanette Allen Behre and Chas. H. Behre Jr., express their dissent with Dr. King taking a public stand on the war in Vietnam. The professors feel Dr. King is jeopardizing his support for the civil rights.

The Voter Registration Project of Winston-Salem Presents MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

This program details the schedule and many sponsors of a Voter Registration Project event in North Carolina, in which Dr. King was the keynote speaker.

Letter from Professor A. Clement to MLK Regarding the Peace Movement

Monday, May 15, 1967

A. Clement, Professor of Foreign Languages at Los Angeles City College, drafted this letter to Dr. King supporting his peace efforts against the Vietnam War. Enclosing 100 dollars, Clement further suggests that King reaches out to churches and synagogues across America to collect a special offering for the cause.

Letter from Harold Franklin to MLK

Saturday, May 2, 1964

Harold Franklin expresses appreciation to Dr. King for granting him scholarship aid.

Freedom and Destiny

Dr. King discusses the topics of freedom and destiny as it relates to man.

MLK Interview: The Negro Protest

Kenneth B. Clark conducts a televised interview with Dr. King, James Baldwin, and Malcolm X. Clark discusses with Dr. King his personal history, the relationship between the love ethic and nonviolent direct action, Malcolm X's claim that nonviolence is perceived by white leaders as weakness, and Baldwin's concern that Negroes will not remain nonviolent if met with brutal responses.

Birmingham Desegregation Settlement Agreement

Friday, May 10, 1963

Dr. King reviews the settlement made between the City of Birmingham and civil rights protesters. This agreement includes the integration of lunch counters, sitting rooms, restrooms, and water fountains within ninety days.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Hicks to MLK

Mary Hicks sends a monetary donation to Dr. King and the SCLC. The donation was sent after Mr. Hicks consulted with author Mrs. Boyle about where a donation could be used.

Royalty Summary from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, November 4, 1966

This cable from Joan Daves to Dr. King details the earned value of British royalties and the number of copies sold for "Stride Towards Freedom" and "Strength to Love."

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Index Card with Dr.King's Handwritten Philosophy Notes

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines insights on pantheism and references philosophers Goethe, Spinoza, and Rousseau. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Letter from Michael George to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1968

Mr. George expresses his views on Dr. King's response to the riots Dr. King assisted in ending.

Letter from Bernhard M. Auer to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Bernhard Auer, publisher for Time magazine, writes Dr. King to express his gratitude for Dr. King's role in helping attain accurate information throughout the year of 1961.

Letter from MLK to W. D. Mason

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in support of the Mercer County Branch of the NAACP in Farrell, Pennsylvania. He expresses his appreciation for the invitation but explains that he has accepted his maximum number of speaking engagements for the spring.

A Journey of Conscience

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

Letter from Emily Fortson to Andrew Young

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Emily Fortson of Concreta Tours Incorporated sends Reverend Andrew Young an itinerary for an upcoming conference. Fortson also requests several materials to be included in a letter being formed to invite Dr. King to the conference.

Letter from J. S. Beckington to MLK

Friday, June 10, 1966

J. S. Beckington, Secretary Treasurer at the Groton School in Massachusetts, encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Japanese Representatives write Dr. and Mrs. King inviting them to the 13th World Conference against atomic and hydrogen bombs.