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Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Tuesday, December 31, 1963
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

In this letter to Dr. King, Norman Thomas, a pacifist and political activist, writes to ensure that he attend a small civil rights conference in Washington, D.C.

Shattered Dreams

SPAIN, INDIA, PAKISTAN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Washington, D.C., New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, ITALY

In a sermon entitled "Shattered Dreams", Dr. King opens with a passage from Romans 15:24. The Reverend continues with the expansion of hopes and the contrast of shattered dreams. Delivering this message from a theological vantage point, Dr. King closes with "Christian faith makes it possible for us nobly to accept that which cannot be changed, to meet disappointments and sorrow with an inner poise..."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 12, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Joan Daves informs Miss McDonald that attachments include carbon copies of checks that were "in question."

Letter from Lucille Banta to MLK

Thursday, October 27, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, JAPAN, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In addition to a financial contribution, Lucille Banta sends Dr. King a proposal for the civil rights and peace movements to oppose the Vietnam War. She suggests that they work together to "plan and organize a nationwide United Peace and Freedom Parade to Washington."

Letter from Dora McDonald to James Pike

Tuesday, April 7, 1964
San Francisco, CA

Dora McDonald informs Dr. James A. Pike that Dr. King will be able to preach for Grace Cathedral's Consecration celebration. She suggests that Dr. Pike lists five possible dates for Dr. King to fulfill this commitment in San Francisco.

Telegram from MLK to Reverend F. D. Reece

Saturday, January 11, 1964
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King congratulates Selma, Alabama Reverend F. D. Reese for demonstrating on behalf of teachers fighting injustice.

1965 Annual Board Meeting for SCLC

Thursday, April 1, 1965
Baltimore, MD

This document details the agenda at the Annual Board Meeting for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Lucious Outlaw to MLK

Nashville, TN

Dr. King notifies Mr. Lucious Outlaw that he is unable to accept the invitation to speak at Fisk University.

War and Pacifism

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Mrs. Elizabeth Sherrill to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967
New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. Sherrill informs Dr. King of a young man, Mr. Jerry Peace, from her church, St. Mark's, who shows great promise as a poet. She encourages Dr. King to reach out to Mr. Peace to help direct his "rather anger energy" into a new direction.

Letter from MLK to Mr. John Lee Tilley

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
Norfolk, VA

Dr. King writes Mr. Tilley, the executive director of the SCLC, after nearly being stabbed to death at a book signing in Harlem, New York. He requests that Mr. Tilley attend to several organizational and book related matters.

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the biblical book of Isaiah which demonstrates the eternalness and holiness of God.

Ebenezer Project Bill

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Citizens Trust Company reminds the SCLC of an upcoming payment related to the "Ebenezer Project."

Holiday Card from the McKinneys

Reverend S. Berry McKinney, his wife and daughter sent Dr. King this holiday card.

Man (Sin)

Dr. King writes about Jeremiah's loss of confidence in man, reflecting on the biblical passage Jeremiah 9: 4-6.

Letter from Malcolm R. La Place II to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1963
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Virginia (VA), Maryland (MD), Pennsylvania (PA), New Orleans, LA

Malcolm La Place of WMAL TV News writes Dr. King regarding his address to the Capital Press Club. He hopes to arrange a videotape session as well.

Letter from John H. Herriford to MLK

Friday, November 11, 1960
Minnesota (MN)

John Herriford, a student at the University of Minnesota, offers Dr. King advice on how to improve sit-in demonstrations.

Letter from Friends of the SNCC to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965
Wisconsin (WI)

Richard Meier and Lowell Bergman request Dr. King's support for a letter-writing campaign directed at members of the Wisconsin State Senate and Assembly.

Anti-Poverty Expenditures that Cheat Federal Taxpayers and the Poor

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, DENMARK, SOUTH AFRICA

Harry G. and Elizabeth R. Brown express their concerns about housing in America. They claim that while open housing will help Negroes who can afford it, those who cannot will continue to live in slums. They pose the idea of reforming the tax policy as a solution to this problem.

Letter from Carol Thomas to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968
New York (NY)

Carol Thomas writes Dr. King to inform him that she is making a donation to help with the war on poverty. Enclosed with the letter is a $125.00 check. She also explains that she received one of King's books in the mail. Ms. Thomas further inquires of the purchasing and mailing information of books made to the public.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Wayne C. Hess

Wednesday, November 2, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Rev. Hess and the participants in the Illinois Conference Evangelical United Brethren Church for their contribution to the SCLC.

Our Struggle

Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Soren Kierkegaard

Dr. King writes about Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard's first stage at which men live, aesthetics.

Letter from Curtis Addings to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. about an Autograph

Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Curtis Addings requests three autographs from Dr. King.

Letter from the Northern Illinois Ministerial Association of the Church of God to MLK

Wednesday, September 15, 1965
Illinois (IL)

Rev. Curtis Barge, Rev. Claude Wyatt and Rev. Willie Barrow send Dr. King two checks as a contribution to the civil rights struggle. One check is for the SCLC and the other is for the Dallas County Voters League.

Letter from Arthur Kinoy to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

In this letter, Mr. Kinoy informs Dr. King of an article in Rutgers' Law Review, that contains Kinoy's and Bill Kunstler's ideas in civil rights litigation. Kinoy is a law professor at Rutgers The State University.

Letter from Joan Daves to Carlota Frahm

Monday, October 26, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY

Joan Daves denies permission to Norwegian Publishers to reprint Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in connection with "Why We Can't Wait." Daves asserts that the speech will be part of Dr. King's forthcoming publication.

What the Reformation Took Out

This note card lists the effects of the Reformation on Christian worship. Summarizing the consequences, Dr. King notes, "the intellectual element was overemphasized."

Letter from Alex Pascal to MLK

California (CA), VIETNAM

Mr. Pascal states that the American people are ignorant to the facts of Vietnam. He praises a recent speech by Dr. King on the subject, and he requests a copy of it.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

Harry Belafonte expresses his deep appreciation to Dr. King for appearing with him on the "Tonight Show." Harry Belafonte concludes by thanking Dr. King for his friendship and for giving his time so generously.