Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Stockholm, Sweden"

Letter from Joan Daves to Stuart Harris Concerning bill from Waldorf-Astoria

Monday, July 20, 1964

This letter is in reference to a bill from the Waldorf Astoria for expenses due to Dr. and Mrs. King's stay, allowing Dr.King to be available for the Today Show and the World at Ten program.

Letter from Emily Barton Arrabee to MLK

Sunday, January 20, 1963

Ms. Arrabee sends a check to Dr. King not for the SCLC, but for Dr. and Mrs. King to use to treat themselves in some way. Arrabee suggests a book, a new record or dinner together. The check is a token of her respect and admiration for both Dr. and Mrs. King.

American Nurses' Association Names Judges for Integration Award

Friday, September 1, 1967

The American Nurses' Association announces its panel of judges for the 1968 Mary Mahoney Award, which honors progress in integration and nursing.

Appreciation Letter from MLK to Maitland Griggs

Thursday, January 10, 1963

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Maitland Griggs contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Abram Eisenman expresses appreciation and admiration for Dr. King's work. Eisenman also
addresses the divide of supporters within the Civil Rights Movement concerning the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Hugh W. Nevin Jr.

Wednesday, November 20, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Hugh Nevin's letter inviting him to speak at St. George's School. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to his full calendar and thanks Mr. Nevin for his nice words regarding his book, "Stride Towards Freedom."

Letter from Christopher Pearce to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967

Mr. Pearce, a young English filmmaker, desiring to produce a documentary on Dr. King, requests permission to follow him about Washington, D. C. during his upcoming visit.

The Second Sunday After Easter

Sunday, April 28, 1968

The preacher begins by reminding the audience about various forms of evil, the church's mission to help humans obtain heavenly rights and other topics from the previous week's sermon. After recapping last Sunday's sermon, the preacher uses the Word of God to answer the question, "How should Christians react to the afflictions they suffer in the world?" The three answers to this question are broken up into three different sections and explained in depth by the speaker.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King cites W. K. Wright's "A Student Outline of Philosophy of Religion."

Letter from Michael Williams to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

The Chairman of the Society of African and Afro-American Students, at the University of Pennsylvania, extends an invitation to Dr. King to come speak with students during "Black Week."

Religion

Dr. King records William Ernest Hocking's definition of religion. Hocking's first name is omitted on the note card.

Letter from Mrs. Cyrus Eaton to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

In this letter, Mrs. Eaton wrote this letter praising Dr. King for his remarks on Face the Nation. Mrs. Eaton states that Dr. King is indebted to him for always voicing his wisdom.

Letter from Sue Jane Mitchell Smock to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Mrs. Smock writes to Dr. King a "note of appreciation" regarding the Nobel Peace Prize and her artwork. A 1964 issue of Time Magazine featured a photograph of Dr. King's living room which displayed a "woodcut print" of Mrs. Smock's work. She also invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a future exhibition in Atlanta.

Letter from Jean L. Bennett to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 20, 1966

Ms. Jean L. Bennett writes to Ms. McDonald regarding the Platters recording of the song "We Ain't What We Was." She believes that the SCLC should adopt this song as an actual theme song for it was inspired by Dr. King. The Platters were a successful vocal group during this time.

Address Before the United Packinghouse Workers of America

At their Thirteenth Constitutional Convention in Minneapolis on May 21, 1962, Dr. King praises the United Packinghouse Workers Union of America for their dedication to civil rights. He states that the civil rights and labor movements share in common a concern for minimum wages, social security, health benefits, decent housing, job security and retirement security. He thanks them for the aid that they have provided and encourages them to continue fighting for equality.

Revision on Preferential Treatment

The document contains an addition to a chapter for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this insert, Dr. King seeks to clear up questions surrounding preferential treatment for negroes. According to the text, "The program of special aid for Negroes and other deprived groups is in no sense discrimination in reverse."

Subsistance Pay for Voter Workers

Friday, December 31, 1965

Copy of a Crusade for Citizenship disbursement check paid to an Alabama worker in a Voter Registaion program. Reason for disbursement is subsistance pay.

Request for MLK To Submit an Article for TV Guide

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

TV Guide seeks Dr. King's critique of television's positive contributions to life in the U.S., race relations, and negro life.

Letter from Ronald F. Jockers and Ronald Schlossman to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Ronald Jockers and Ronald Schlossman write Dr. King inviting him to participate in the National Collegiate Presidential Primary Choice of 1968.

24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea

Sunday, March 14, 1965

Woodlawn Community Services Agency issues an invitation to come to the 24th Annual Blue Ribbon Tea where Dr. King will be honored.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

Individualization and Participation

Dr. King records notes on the individualization and participation of man.

A Lack of Jewish Soldiers

Thursday, August 25, 1966

T.S. D'Amico writes Dr. King and others over what he perceives as a lack of Jewish men being drafted into military service.

Letter from Yolanda Riverra to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Yolanda Riverra, a student, writes to Mrs. King expressing sympathy for Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from MLK to the Erie, Pennsylvania NAACP

Friday, March 30, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from Erie Branch of the NAACP.

Importance of Negro History and Independence

Monday, May 1, 1967

Dr. King speaks to society's misunderstanding of Negro thought and the resulting tensions in race relations. He attributes this misunderstanding to the lack of Negro history authentically represented in books. Contrived myths created by "omission and commission in books" have reinforced prejudice and faulty sense of white supremacy. He observes that illusions cloud reality and render hostility. Society's unresolved problems are aggravated by racial misconceptions.

What Is Man?

This is one of several documents where Dr. King explores the nature of "man." He considers the question "what is man?" to be a timeless concept that "confronts any generation." Dr. King's analysis incorporates Biblical and Shakespearean texts, among other notable references.

Letter of Gratitude from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967

In this letter, Maurice A. Dawkings, the Assistant Director for Civil Rights, expresses gratitude for the work Dr. King does.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Altina Carey

Monday, January 8, 1962

Dora McDonald informs Altina Carey that she discussed his letter with Dr. King over the telephone and he looks forward to hearing from Mr. Carey after his meeting with Mr. Killens.

Rejection Letter from MLK to Areatha G. Bailey Regarding the Freedom Fund Dinner

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King informs Areatha G. Bailey that he will not be able to attend the Freedom Fund Dinner.