Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Stockholm, Sweden"

Individualization

Dr. King cites philosopher and theologian Paul Tillich's definition of individualization. He explains, "it is implied in and constitutive of every self, which means that at least in an analogous way it is implied in and constitutive of every being."

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Letter from Darlene Wentz to MLK

Wednesday, March 14, 1962

Darlene Wentz, a Senior at Streeter High School, request pamphlets on the social and economic conditions of African Americans.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm to MLK about a Humanity Button

Friday, March 1, 1968

In this letter Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm enclose a button called the "Pentagon of Humanity," which the Heussenstamm's also sent to the President and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Accordingly the symbol represents “love, unity and wisdom—the community of man.”

Dewey

Dr. King records John Dewey's views on philosophy and religion.

Letter from Melvin Arnold to MLK

Thursday, November 29, 1962

Melvin Arnold addressed this letter to Dr. King, inquiring about the publishing of his second book, "Stregnth to Love."This letter contains a request for Dr. King to negotiate a contract and deal with issues of royalties. Also included is Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in blue ink.

Prayer

Dr. King records a prayer.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

Letter from Mrs. William Wenger to MLK

Mrs. Wenger pleads with Dr. King to never give up the fight for civil rights.

Letter from Kenneth Pierce to MLK

Kenneth Pierce was recently released from Fulton County jail and informs Dr. King that he would like to speak to him about an "important situation." Mr. Pierce also references another cellmate who would like to communicate to Dr. King or one of his representatives as well.

Letter from Lisl Cade to Dora McDonald Regarding Various Interview Requests for Dr. King

In this letter, Lisl Cade of Harper & Row Publishers requests for Dr. King to interview with a Washington, D.C. television program and a San Francisco radio program.

Survey from Jack Hillhouse to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. about Mass Communications Media

This incomplete survey form is from a graduate student, Jack Hillhouse, seeking to understand the connection, if any, between mass communications media and race riots, demonstrations, and disturbances.

Blue Spiral Notebook

Contained in this notebook is a draft of Dr. King's statement to Judge James E. Webb following his arrest during the Rich's Magnolia Tea Room Sit-In. There is also an outline of a letter to female students who were arrested during the sit-in. On other pages a child practices handwriting.

Letter from Edward Williams to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967

The United Presbyterian Church's Commission on Religion and Race awarded a grant to SCLC for the salary of Hosea Williams. The letter accompanies a check for partial payment.

Letter from Carleton L. Spier to MLK

Wednesday, January 11, 1967

Spier shares his disapproval of Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell and his concern regarding Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Newspaper Article on MLK Advertisement in "The Washington Afro-American" August 29, 1964

Saturday, August 29, 1964

Here, in this newspaper clipping, is an advertisement of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait", The ad also makes reference to the reverend, being chosen as Time magazine's "Man of the Year".

Letter from M. L. Banner to MLK

Friday, September 13, 1963

The board of directors of the Booker T. Washington Center, Inc. requests Dr. King to serve as the guest speaker for their annual banquet. The Booker T. Washington Center is the only predominately Negro Welfare Agency in the community.

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

Saturday, May 6, 1967

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Evil

Dr. King notes the problem of evil from the viewpoint of the Stoics.

Letter from Mrs. Presley Layer to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

As a member of the Urban League and other civic organizations, Mrs. Layer expresses her concerns about the conduct of marches verses a more militant tactic. Mrs. Layer asserts that we live in a violent nation and is concerned that violent pacifist will become uncontrollable. She concludes with informing Dr. King she is an admirer and long supporter of the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Kenneth Keating

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

In this dictation by Dr. King, he expresses gratitude to the Honorable Kenneth B. Keating for his leadership in securing the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

New Wars For Old

Alfred Noyes writes a poem entitled, "New Wars For Old." Mr. Noyes focuses on various aspects of life and repeatedly asks, "when have we prayed for peace."

Worship

Dr. King notes some attributes and results of worship.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 14, 1964

This letter references the enclosure of a check as an advance for the German edition of "Strength to Love".

Redwood City, CA Tribune

Saturday, June 10, 1967

At the bottom of this clipping, from the Redwood City, California Tribune, is a brief update on the release of Dr. King's final book. The book entitled: "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", according to the tribune, anticipated that it would be a very must-read publication.

Letter from Bill Baxter to Harry Belafonte

Friday, April 12, 1968

Bill Baxter, a public school arts teacher, addressed this letter to entertainer Harry Belafonte, following the assassination of Dr. King. The content of the correspondence expressed great admiration towards the work of Dr. King and the talents of Mr. Belafonte. Mr. Belafonte was a trusted friend and adviser of Dr. King, during the civil rights movement.

Letter from Florence Read to MLK

Wednesday, May 5, 1965

Florence Read informs Dr. King that she received news of his Nobel Peace Prize while traveling in the Middle East. She encloses articles from The Jerusalem Times and The Daily Star of Beirut for Dr. King's records.

Letter from MLK to Michael Joesph Mansfield

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senator Mansfield for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Dr. William G. Anderson to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

Dr. William G. Anderson accepts Dr. King's invitation to join the Board of Directors of the SCLC for a three year period.

Contract between MLK and Cheltenham Township Adult School

Saturday, December 21, 1963

This document is a contract between Dr. King and a Wyncote, PA school with the agreement of Dr. King delivering a talk for the compensation and expenses listed.