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Schleiermacher (The Essence of Christianity)

Dr. King writes that Friedrich Schleiermacher describes the essence of Christianity as a belief in Jesus as the origin of the Christian faith and his work as that of redemption.

Mysticism

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking’s “The Meaning of God in Human Experience.”

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harold E. Carlson

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend Carlson to thank him for his recent telegram of encouragement and support. Dr. King states, "You may be confident that such reassurance provides us with an additional source of strength." Dr. King also discusses the philosophy of the SCLC.

Tentative Schedule for MLK

This document outlines Dr. King's tentative schedule of cities and states he will tour.

Democratic National Convention Platform Committee Statement

Saturday, August 1, 1964

In this statement delivered August 22, 1964, Dr. King outlines three urgent priorities for the Committee and the party as a whole: enforcement of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, furthering voting rights and the war on poverty. He asks that the platform include a recommendation that a panel of voting rights marshals be established and that the Convention support a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Letter from Dr. Alex Hershaft to MLK

Saturday, June 24, 1967

Dr. Alex Hershaft writes to Dr. King to tell him he is happy to make a donation now that Dr. King has aligned himself against the war in Vietnam. Rather than having to choose between donating to civil rights or anti-war causes, Dr. Hershaft can donate to Dr. King and accomplish both.

MLK Discusses Plans for the 1963 March on Washington

Wednesday, January 23, 1963

While in Detroit, Michigan, Dr. King discloses his intentions for the upcoming March on Washington.

Letter from Robert Dent to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Chairman Robert Dent welcomes Dr. King to San Diego County on behalf of the Board of Supervisors. Dent highlights the growth of Southern California in industry as well as the county's work towards equality. Dent also discusses the importance of Christianity in their endeavors.

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

Letter from Southern Junior High School to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1967

R. E. Lyles, Principal of Southern Junior High School in Columbus, Georgia, requests that Dr. King provide biographical information and a photograph for the Muscogee County School District's Annual Social Science Fair.

Letter from Ruth N. Smith to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968

Ruth Smith sends a monetary contribution in support of Dr. King's efforts for African Americans and the Civil Rights Movement. She informs him that she will not be physically present for the upcoming demonstration in D.C., but she will support him in spirit.

Letter from James A. Dombrowski Regarding S.C.E.F. Contribution

In this document, James A. Dombrowski, the Executive Director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. requests a $10.00 contribution.

Letter from Charles E. Rogers to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Charles Rogers writes Dr. King expressing his grief because of King's recent "allegiance to the communist cause in Southeast Asia." Rogers states that because of Dr. King's speech, his fame will face a decline and people will ask, "who is Martin Luther King?"

Revelation

Dr. King discusses the idea that Jesus Christ is the only direct form of revelation, which was proposed in Emil Brunner's "The Mediator."

Telegram from Congressman Don Edwards to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

California Democratic Congressman Don Edwards congratulates Dr. King on his April 4th, 1967 speech "Beyond Vietnam," and commends his courage in speaking "so clearly on this vital question."

Letter from John R. Yungblut to CSK

Monday, August 2, 1965

Mr. Yungblut of Quaker House, writes Mrs. King to inquire whether the King Children may be interested in participating in a youth dramatics program.

Letter from Playboy Magazine to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Doug Benson writes on behalf of Hugh Hefner in response to a letter from Dr. King requesting donations. Benson informs Dr. King that Mr. Hefner, who supports the civil rights struggle, suggests placing a shorter, more personalized, appeal for funds in The Playboy Forum.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

The document, shown here, contains an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon was entitled, "The Fellow Who Stayed at Home." According, to the outline, Dr. King breaks down two types of sin: Sins of Passion and Sins of Disposition.

Letter from John Lawton to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967

John Lawton, the Chairman of the Speech Department at Boston College, informs Dr. King about his program of student speakers who discuss various controversial issues with different organizations in New England. The objective of his program is to inform the community of civil rights issues involving education and employment. Furthermore, Mr. Lawson requests a conference with Dr. King to review the program concept.

The Eternality of God Verses The Temporality of Man

This document is an outline of the sermon titled "The Eternality of God Versus the Temporality of Man." In the first two sections, Dr. King contrasts the time-conditioned nature of man with God, who transcends time. The final portion highlights a significant fact that God is absolute and unchangeable.

Telegram from Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz offer their encouragement to Dr. King.

Notecard Containing the Definition of Thinking

This notecard quotes Dr. Brightman's definition of thinking, taken from "An Intro to Philosophy".

"In a Word-Now" by MLK

Sunday, September 29, 1963

In the attainment of civil rights, Dr. King stresses the importance and urgency of "NOW". He further expounds on the immediate and effective actions that should be exercised by the Federal government to better the society.

Apostles' Creed

Dr. King outlines the history of the Apostles' Creed and states the creed in its Roman form.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

This is a draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Handwritten notes are written in the margins to indicate future amendments. Dr. King states that he experiences this moment of acceptance for himself and "those magnificent devotees of nonviolence who have moved so courageously against the ramparts of racial injustice."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Edith Segal

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dora McDonald communicates to Edith Segal that she has be referred to the letter addressed originally to Bernard Lee. Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Segal that Dr. King is unable to comment on her book due to his consistent traveling endeavors in the South for the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Franklin D. Roosevelt III about Contribution

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Roosevelt regarding a contribution he made to the SCLC.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK

Friday, May 26, 1967

In this document, Dr. King receives a royalty check from J. Campe for the use of A Stone of Hope in a work entitled "This Nation." The amount of the check is 13.50.