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Letter from Ruth N. Smith to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968
Rhode Island (RI), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Ruth Smith sends a monetary contribution in support of Dr. King's efforts for African Americans and the Civil Rights Movement. She informs him that she will not be physically present for the upcoming demonstration in D.C., but she will support him in spirit.

Letter from Richard B. Specht to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Richard B. Specht requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the importance of Latin for modern day students.

Walter Winchell: Man Doing A Column

South Carolina (SC), New York (NY), California (CA)

In part of this edition of his syndicated gossip column, Walter Winchell briefly criticizes SNCC in the irreverent style for which he was known.

Letter to Rev. Malcolm Calhoun to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968
Virginia (VA)

Dr. King appreciates Rev. Calhoun's concern for the SCLC and the mission the organization has for the creating equality. Dr. King then explains how other programs offer contributions to the SCLC so that they may continue to engage in education, voter registration, economic development, and training of ministers for urban ministries.

Richard Parrish and Daniel H. Watts Press Release on William Worthy Passport Case

Monday, October 22, 1962
New York, NY, Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), Wisconsin (WI), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

This news release announces plans to picket the American Jewish Congress Award Banquet held for Attorney General Robert Kennedy at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York. The Attorney General is to receive an award "for advancing human freedom."

I'll Take My Stand

Washington, D.C.

Thelmore Cooper Trotman composes this poem entitled "Ill Take My Stand." The poem expresses the plight of the Negro struggle and the injustices of a case involving the rights of five Negros. Mr. Trotman elaborates on his personal health as he is of old age and explains his appreciation for Dr. King's organization.

Schleiermacher (Where Religion Is to Be Found)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”"

Waste in Foreign Aid

Sunday, February 19, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), BRAZIL, Washington, D.C.

Irene M. Kashmer suggests Dr. King address the issue of wasted foreign aid in his march on Washington. She encloses a New York Times article from February 15, 1967 to emphasize her point.

Letter from K. Natwar Singh to MLK

Thursday, October 1, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, INDIA

K. Natwar Singh requests an appearance by Dr. King for the upcoming non-profit event honoring the late Prime Minister of India, Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. With the publication of the memorial, Singh requests that Dr. King also write a tribute. Attached to the letter is an example entitled "I Too Have Seen."

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, September 10, 1965
JAPAN

Joan Daves notifies Dora McDonald that she is sending "two Japanese language copies of two titles". The titles were originally addressed to Dr. King via Joan's office.

Letter from Ralph Ahlberg to Ralph David Abernathy

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Minister Ahlberg extends condolences on behalf of The Congregational Church of Rockville Centre to Rev. Abernathy upon the assassination of Dr. King.

UAW 25th Anniversary Dinner Program

Thursday, April 27, 1961
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Indiana (IN)

The UAW's 25th Anniversary Dinner Program contains letters from notable activists commending the UAW, a statement from President Kennedy, a guest list, the evening's program, and a list of sponsors and donors. Guest speakers include: Dr. King, Senator Paul Douglas, Secretary of Labor Arthur Goldberg, and UAW President Walter Reuther.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Letter from MLK to Transportation Workers Union President Matthew Guinan

Tuesday, March 8, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks newly elected Transport Workers Union President Matthew Guinan for his contribution that will aid SCLC in their efforts. However, the contribution was made out to Dr. King, which causes him to inform Mr. Guinan to make the check payable to the SCLC. Dr. King congratulates Guinan on his recent position and wishes him much success.

Memo on Strategy of the Integration Movement

Birmingham, AL

An anonymous writer pens a comprehensive strategy that focuses on achieving racial integration. Within the text of the document, the writer identifies various political, social and economical developments that are needed in order to end racially stemmed inequalities for African Americans.

Invitation from C.W. De Kiewiet to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

Cornell William De Kieweit invites Dr. King to speak as the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecturer at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Mr. De Kieweit explains the civil rights struggle in South Africa and explains that Dr. King's appearance would be of great help.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968
California (CA), Chicago, IL, Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C., Arizona (AZ), Maryland (MD), Selma, AL, Detroit, MI, Philadelphia, PA, Atlantic City, NJ, Texas (TX), Cincinnati, OH, Cleveland, OH, Los Angeles, CA, Tennessee (TN), GERMANY, CONGO / ZAIRE, AUSTRALIA

An unknown author questions Dr. King about his leadership and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. He references various racial, political, and social events, and stresses that Dr. King is responsible for all the riots, violence and looting.

Letter from US Citizen to MLK

"A citizen who loves the country God let him own," writes to Dr. and Mrs. King criticizing them on their views on Vietnam and their ministerial work in regards to Christianity.

Why Negroes Are Still Angry

Friday, July 1, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI, Connecticut (CT), Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

American journalist Victor Bernstein details for Redbook why Negroes are still angry in the face of the apparent success of the Civil Rights Movement. He points out that the Movement has enabled many whites to see that integration and equal rights are right, but still knowingly choose to behave as if they are wrong.

Letter from Jack Egle to Reverend Martin Sargent

Tuesday, April 12, 1966
FRANCE

The European Director of the Council of Student Travel, Jack Egle, writes Martin Sargent addressing a statement made in the Herald Tribune regarding Dr. King's and Harry Belanfonte's opinions on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Pierre C. Armand to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968
New York (NY), HAITI, GUINEA, Brooklyn, NY

Mr. Armand writes Dr. King concerning the goals of The Haitian Community Center in New York City. The Center attempts to institute programming in order to alleviate the various difficulties of the Haitian community. Mr. Armand also invites Dr. King to speak at a distinguished event as an honorary guest.

Letter from MLK to Alice Sargent

Tuesday, November 26, 1963
Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak at Temple University from the Assistant Director of Student Activities. He states that he enjoys speaking with college and university students, he gracefully declines the invitation due to his civil rights commitments in the South. He also addresses Mrs. Sargent's question presented in her letter regarding the role Temple University can play in the Civil Rights Movement. He tells her that Rev. C.T. Vivian, Dr.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E.Mays to William J. Trent, Jr.

Friday, January 31, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays is notifying William Trent that Dr. King will meet with John D. Rockefellar, III at his office on Feburary 6. What the meeting is about is not specified in the letter.

Letter from Ruth Olsen to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 6, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Iowa (IA)

Ruth Olsen of St. Ansgar's Lutheran Church writes Dora McDonald requesting 30 copies of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from William T. Murphy to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Murphy, a representative of the United States Congress, writes to Dr. King to convey his intentions to support the House of Judiciary Committee Voting Rights bill.

Letter from MLK to Beulah H. Brunson

Monday, January 30, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Beulah H. Brunson of the Georgiana Thomas Grand Chapter O. E. S. for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King comments on the progress made over the past decade in improving conditions for Negroes in the South.

MLK Speech Outline

This document contains a preliminary speech outline by Dr. King. The topic of the talk is "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness," and in it Dr. King maintains that, "We must continue to courageously challenge the system of segregation."

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, July 18, 1967
New York (NY)

Governor Nelson Rockefeller writes Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?".

Annual Report of The President: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Chicago, IL, Jackson, MS, North Carolina (NC), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In the SCLC's Annual Presidential Report, Dr. King chronicles a decade of organization's activities to eliminate segregation. The report was delivered at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC.

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King summarizes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "Can God Be Perceived" that appeared in The Journal of Religion (1943).