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Education

Dr. King outlines his views on education.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967
INDIA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Rodney Clurman, of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, asks Dr. King if he can access his mailing list or circulate material that Clurman provides in an effort to end the famine in India.

Telegram from Reverend Daniel Speed to Reverend Andrew Young

Monday, August 2, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL)

A telegram from Rev. Speed informing Rev. Young of arrival information for the 1965 Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Dora McDonald to A. Dale Fiers

Monday, October 17, 1966
Indiana (IN)

Miss McDonald sends Dr. Fiers an expense statement for Dr. King's appearance in Dallas, Texas for the International Convention.

Letter to MLK from Paul Anderson

Berkeley, CA, San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Paul Anderson expressed concern about what he perceived as Dr. King's move toward the "new left." With a sense of immediacy he urged Dr. King to plan to meet with Robert Pickus on his next visit to northern California. Anderson posited that Pickus' plan concerning the Vietnam War is more worthy to be aligned with the non-violent tradition, "unlike the movement toward which Dr. King is leaning."

Letter from Dora McDonald to F. Newton Miller

Tuesday, February 9, 1965
New York (NY)

In Dr. King's absence, Dora McDonald writes F. Newton Miller concerning Dr. King's appearance in Rockville Centre on February 21. McDonald encloses a copy of a letter sent to Mrs. Rose R. Silvers of the Rockville Centre Commission to clarify the misunderstanding.

What Will You Be When You Grow Up

Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA

This pamphlet is one of the early equal employment opportunity publications by the US government. The President's committee on government contracts was established by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1953.

Fleeing From God

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Fleeing From God." King references the biblical scripture Jonah 1:3 as the foundation of his sermon, asserting that one cannot flee from God or His will.

Along This Way: The Violence of Poverty

Saturday, January 1, 1966
California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In his regular column of the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the rate of unemployment among Negroes. He states that 2/3 of all Negro families live in poverty. Dr. King argues that the administration needs to carry out the mandate of the Unemployment Act of 1945 and stimulate employment.

Letter from Eunice Gentry to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Berkeley, CA

Eunice Gentry writes to Dr. King expressing gratitude for his bravery and encouraging words. In closing Gentry states, "I am glad you are marching for us."

Van Til, Cornelius

Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King cites Cornelius Van Til's "The New Modernism."

Letter from Clarence H. Haines to MLK

Wednesday, August 3, 1966
Massachusetts (MA), GERMANY

Clarence Haines encloses a donation and comments on economic power. Haines suggests a verbal network between Negros so they can learn which stores are integrated and friendly in order to support those business owners.

Letter to MLK from Rose Spann

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Montgomery, AL

Rosa Spann of West Kinney Jr. High School, expresses her appreciation to Dr. King by writing a poem called "The Undergrounders."

Statement of Wisdom

Dr. King references a quote from Aldous Huxley's "Ends and Means" regarding wisdom.

Letter from Jameas Lucas to MLK Regarding Legal Help

Louisiana (LA)

Mr. Lucas requests Dr. King's legal assistance regarding a manslaughter trial against a white man.

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

Letter from Tadashi Akaishi to MLK Requesting Permission to Publish MLK's Dissertation

Friday, March 26, 1965
Richmond, VA

This letter from Tadashi Akaishi to Dr. King requests background information and the rights to publish Dr. King's dissertation.

Declaration of "Nobel Peace Prize Day" Desired

Virginia (VA), Norfolk, VA

This press release announces the Virginia State Unit of the SCLC's appeal to Governor Albertis Harrison in hopes that he will establish a "Nobel Peace Prize Day" in honor of Dr. King. The proposed day will possibly be held in conjunction with a speech Dr. King will deliver at Virginia State College and the Virginia SCLC State Convention.

Letter from Congressman Charles Diggs to MLK

Monday, July 22, 1963
Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI)

Michigan Congressman Charles Diggs returns the proposed plans for the August 28th, 1963 "March on Washington" to Dr. King.

Telegram to Alan Reitman from MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King informs Alan Reitman of the American Civil Liberties Union that he will sign a statement opposing the House Un-American Activities Committee and the Senate Internal Securities Committee.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 28, 1965
New York, NY

In this letter Ms. Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for sending her the commission check from the "Saturday Review" SELMA piece. Daves goes on to say that Dr. King's article on the Watts riots was not published in several publications due to "scheduling problems", but will run in the "Saturday Review".

Letter from MLK to Charles E. Merrill, Jr.

Friday, November 4, 1966
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Merrill's contribution to the SCLC. He also states that he looks forward to seeing Mr. Merrill at the Morehouse College of Trustees meeting taking place the following week.

MLK Notes

Dr. King expresses concern about common attitudes towards the Church. In his words, "So often people will do a good thing, and then spoil it by some ugly twist of the spirit."

Letter from Thelma Berlack Boozer to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Thelma Berlack Boozer, President of Gothamettes, Inc. writes Dr. King sending a contribution of $150. In closing, Boozer requests a receipt or prompt acknowledgement of the contribution.

Letter from MLK and Rev. Abernathy Regarding the Clergymen's Conference

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL

Dr. King and Rev. Abernathy write to inform their readers of the tentative dates of the Clergymen's Conference on Operation Breadbasket. King and Abernathy mention that the dates of the conference need to be moved due to their impending jail sentence.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This telegram was sent from Benjamin Elijah Mays and his wife to Dr. King at the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia.

Transcendentalism

Dr. King provides background information on Ralph Waldo Emerson's theory of transcendentalism.

Letter from Jose Luis Villar Palasi to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967
Madrid, Spain

Jose Luis Villar Palasi informs Dr. King tha that the Chair for Cultural Sociology has invited him to present at the Universidad of Madrid.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

New York (NY), California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

Refinement by Fire

Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Texas (TX), New Orleans, LA

R. Elizabeth Johns describes the events surrounding voter registration in the South and tactics used by civil rights and opposition leaders.