Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"TAIWAN"

Religious Witness For Human Dignity Booklet

Sunday, May 31, 1964
Los Angeles, CA

Religious Witness for Human Dignity seeks the support of members of the Protestant, Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Jewish Communities in the struggle for civil rights.

Progressives to Face Important Issues in Birmingham

Monday, October 31, 1966
Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), North Carolina (NC), Cincinnati, OH, Memphis, TN, Missouri (MO), Birmingham, AL

This news release details a meeting of the Progressive National Baptist Convention's Southern Regional in Birmingham, Alabama. Reverend Martin King, Sr. is one of the many pastors participating.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

The Real Poverty

Sunday, December 4, 1966
Alabama (AL)

SCLC Director of Public Relations Junius Griffin announces the opening of the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee of the Wilcox County, Alabama branch of the SCLC. Throughout the speech, he asserts that true poverty is a "man without compassion," and that any person who does not know how to help others is worse off than "our ancestors who were slaves."

Letter from Marvin Caplan of Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

In a letter to the heads of various organizations, Marvin Caplan encloses information regarding the Crime Control Bill that was sent to all members of the State Judiciary Committee. The enclosure is entitled "A New Threat to School Desegregation."

The Forbidden Book of the Century

California (CA)

J. Partyka's book, "Never Come Early" is announced as the "Forbidden Book" of the century. This announcement claims that the book wil "quake the hallowed halls of psychiatry, education and religion."

Letter from Sympathizer to MLK

Writing under a pseudonym, the author suggests that the world is separate because that is the way that God intended it to be. The author pulls text from the Bible to support this idea. The author believes that society was equal with the separation and there is no need for Dr. King to continue his fight.

Letter from J. Campe to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"and "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, March 6, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter is enclosed a check and details of expenses for the Italian Edition of "Stride Toward Freedom and "Why We Can't Wait".

SCLC's Operation Breadbasket - Quarterly Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Chicago, IL, Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA, Milwaukee, WI, Cleveland, OH, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, North Carolina (NC), Detroit, MI

The SCLC issued this comprehensive quarterly report on the activities of Operation Breadbasket. Operation Breadbasket focused on acquiring jobs and economic development for the Negro community through contract negotiations and boycotts.

Judgement or Justice

Dr. King quotes a book entitled "Sea Dreams," by Alfred Lord Tennyson, regarding judgement and justice.

Morehouse Introduction to Philosophy Notes

FRANCE, Atlanta, GA

These typed notes from Dr. King’s early years at Morehouse College are for an Introduction to Philosophy course led by Professor Samuel Williams. King outlines the topic of highest ends: motive and standard, changing and unchanging morality, and reason and emotion that determine the standard.

Letter from Bea Subt to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967
New York, NY, California (CA), VIETNAM, CAMBODIA, PHILIPPINES, AUSTRALIA

The author sends Dr. King a letter informing him that she is withdrawing her assistance toward civil rights workers since he has decided to be a politician, military leader and diplomat. She also questions how he can fight for equal rights in a country that's not worth protecting from the communists.

New Housing Developments - West

Ohio (OH)

This outline entails the location, prices, floor plans and descriptions of new homes for Negro families.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Moreland Griffith Smith

Thursday, February 25, 1965
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

Andrew Young informs Moreland Griffith Smith Sr. that he will be unable to attend a meeting in Montgomery, Alabama. Reverend James Bevel will attend the meeting instead.

Letter to MLK from F.D. Patterson regarding Differences of Opinion

Monday, April 17, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

The president of Phelps-Stokes Fund writes to encourage Dr. King to meet annually with other Negro leaders for a discussion on their differences of opinion.

Lifts to Living

Washington, D.C.

Nanny H. Burroughs sends a short book entitled "Here and Beyond - The Sunset" with her signature and tag line to wish Dr. King a glorious New Year. The book contains a list of inspirational songs, parables, and poems regarding the process of life and spiritual encouragement.

Letter to Martin Luther King Jr. from Clement Alexandre 1957

Friday, October 4, 1957
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King received this letter from Doubleday & Company, regarding offering Dr. King royalties to write his first book. The owner/publisher of Doubleday, Clement Alexandre, tried to persuade Dr. King to work with them on a book that would expand his base of influence. The book would relate to issues of civil and political issues.

Invitation from Frederick Williams to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Brooklyn, NY

Frederick Williams, Director of the New York City Board of Education, asks Dr. King to appear as a guest speaker on the board's new television station, WNYC-TV.

Letter from Debbie Rubiano to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

Letter From Walter R. McCall to MLK

Tuesday, January 3, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Morehouse School of Religion Director Walter McCall asks Dr. King for a contribution to purchase a piano that will be presented to Morehouse School of Religion.

Letter to the Managers of "Christianity Today'' from Rev Earl E. Josten

Saturday, June 17, 1967
Iowa (IA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

In this letter, dated June 17, 1967, Josten writes to the managers of "Christianity Today" to inform them that he cannot comply with their request for names. He is not complying because of the attitude Christianity Today's editor is taking toward Dr. King. Rev. Josten is a pastor at The Methodist Church in Columbus Junction, Iowa. Josten offers prayer to the editor for his "terrible tirade" against King, and states that he will not commend this paper to any more friends if this attitude continues.

Letter from Edward J. Warren to Senator Jacob K Javits

Friday, March 16, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Mr. Warren writes to Senator Javits to confirm receipt of a previous correspondence. He expresses gratitude for Javits position on Human Rights.

MLK - Notes on "Highest Value"

These handwritten notes of Dr. King's focus on the concept of "highest value" in its various iterations.

Remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School

Tuesday, March 8, 1960
Wisconsin (WI), Indiana (IN), Ohio (OH), London, England, FRANCE, INDIA, ITALY, Minnesota (MN), INDONESIA, CHINA, POLAND, IRELAND, Massachusetts (MA)

Harris Wofford, Jr. gives these remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School on March 8, 1960. Wofford has several ties with Dr. King in cases such as arranging a trip to India, helping to write "Stride Toward Freedom," and negotiating with Senator Kennedy and Vice-President Nixon during the 1960 presidential campaign. In addition, Wofford was the Special Assistant for Civil Rights under U. S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy.

MLK Speaks on the African American Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Massachusetts (MA), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King speaks to an assembly in Chicago, Illinois about the history and dynamics of the African American family in the United States.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967
SWITZERLAND, Cleveland, OH, New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

William Rutherford recounts his difficulties trying to contact Dr. King while he was in the United States. He goes on to express interest in doing fundraising programs for SCLC in Europe, as well as, mobilizing public opinion in support of the cause.

61:19 General Correspondence 1961 (R)

Tuesday, October 24, 1961
Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA)

Maude Reid request a manuscript copy of Dr. King's speech at New Calvary Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

Letter from John Shirley to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968
Atlanta, GA, London, England, Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C.

John Shirley, of the Oxford University Cherwell Newspaper, poses a list of questions to Dr. King concerning Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, and the emergence of Black Power groups. Shirley assures the Reverend of his gratitude for any feedback he may provide, and informs him of the circulation of the literature at being well over 10,000 within the University.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activists, presents Dr. King with a proposed plan aimed at applying pressure on President Johnson and other political leaders to end the war in Vietnam. The plan includes such actions as bombarding Congress with letters, demanding that President Johnson resign, and urging Republicans to nominate a ticket with candidates in support of an anti-Vietnam war policy. If none of the suggestions are effective, Smedley encourages a push for an independent ticket.