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Letter from Derrick Cameron to MLK

Thursday, January 20, 1966

Derrick Cameron, a seventh grade student, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his fight in Civil Rights. In addition, Cameron offers to make copies on his ditto machine; a low-volume printing method used mainly by schools and churches.

Letter from Charles Merrill to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967

Charles Merrill, who was Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King that he is sending a donation of $5000 to be used for "either peace or civil rights work" and he concludes by offering his view on Dr. King's philosophy.

Watson

Dr. King references behaviorist John B. Watson regarding man's behavior.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Fielder

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Dr. Fielder for sending two poems and reminds him of the necessity of seeking peace through non-violence.

Letter from Lucy Melhuish to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Lucy A. Melhuish requests Dr. King's assistance in acquiring copies of speeches from the Poor People's March on Washington. Ms. Melhuish is a graduate student working on her doctorate degree at California State College.

The Evening Star: The Perversion of a Cause

Monday, March 13, 1967

This article describes the effect of James Meredith's withdrawal from the race for Adam Powell's congressional seat. Civil Rights activists such as Dr. King, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. McKissick offer their opinions on how the race was handled.

Letter from David Sutton to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

The associate director of Alumni Relations at Drexel Institute of Technology invites Dr. King to speak at the newly formed Downtown Luncheon Club. Mr. Sutton mentions that the alumni of Drexel revere Dr. King's philosophy and principles of nonviolence. He also informs Dr. King about the confirmed attendance of Pulitzer Prize winner James Michener.

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

Letter from Congressman Herman Toll to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

Pennsylvania Democratic Congressman Herman Toll thanks Dr. King for his letter and assures Dr. King that he will continue to seek strong civil rights legislation.

Letter from Robert R. Janks to MLK

Monday, October 14, 1963

Robert R. Janks writes Dr. King admiring his leadership during the fight for equality. Janks also recommends two additional quotes that Dr. King should use in his future speeches.

Dr. E. Gallardo Letter Dr. King 1968

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

This is a letter to Dr. E. Gallardo from Dr. King thanking him for his one-hundred dollar contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Chip Hawkins to MLK

Monday, January 2, 1967

In this letter, Chip Hawkins questions Dr. King's affiliation with communist organizations and individuals. In addition, he requests that Dr. King publicly address the Communist accusations brought against him.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Herman Strase

Thursday, October 28, 1965

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Strase position on justice for all. More specifically, he praises Strase for his written sentiments concerning apartheid policies of the Union of South Africa government.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer questions Dr. King about blacks committing brutal acts against whites.

Plato Psychology

Dr. King explores Plato's contribution to psychology.

Letter from C. I. C. Bosanquet to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

C. I. C Bosanquet, Vice Chancellor of the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, expresses delight in Dr. King upcoming visit to receive an honorary Doctor of Civil Law degree. He sends Dr. King a lists possible transportation options from London to the university and inquires about the length of his stay.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. V. E. Moray

Friday, April 14, 1967

Joan Daves gives Dr. Moray permission to publish a Marathi edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Esther Jackson to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965

Esther Jackson of the New York Shakespeare Festival sends Dr. King a "discussion letter" to raise the issue of desegregating the arts. Nationwide, new arts programs will emerge and existing organizations funded as part of "Great Society" programs. Jackson calls for an effort to prevent discrimination in such programs now rather than attempting to dislodge discrimination after it becomes further entrenched. She outlines the beginning of a response to the issue.

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Outward Form)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion." The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.

Letter from Robert J. McCraken to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

Reverend McCracken extends an invitation to Dr. King to preach at The Riverside Church in New York.

Letter from Senator Jacob Javits to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Senator Javits writes Dr. King to thank him for reaching out to him in need of funds for the SCLC. Mr. Javits then encloses a small contribution and apologizes for not being able to contribute more.

Letter from Dr. John Halsey to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1963

Dr. James Halsey of the University of Bridgeport expresses gratitude for Dr. King's contribution to the Alumni Average Gift Improvement Matching Plan.

Letter from MLK to Johnnie McKinney

Thursday, May 13, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Cheyenne, Wyoming "under the auspices of the NAACP."

Letter from Sister M. Angelice to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964

Sister Angelice, Acting President of Ursiline College in Louisville, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and expresses admiration for his civil rights efforts.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

Telegram from Coretta Scott King to the Family of Dr. Thomas Merton

Tuesday, December 17, 1968

Mrs. Coretta Scott King writes to the family of Dr. Thomas Merton expressing her condolences regarding his death. She explains that the tribute Dr. Merton paid to her late husband will never be forgotten and urges the family to remember that the spiritual bonds that exist between a family is eternal.

Invitation from Saint Vincent College to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1963

Ralph J. Hils Jr., Director of Assemblies, invites Dr. King to address the student body at St. Vincent's College. He shares a local encounter with discrimination against their American and African Negro students. Mr. Hils outlines the history of the college and provides the names of other prominent visitors of the campus.

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

Card from the English Family

The English Family sends a card that lists words of encouragement for each day of the week.

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.