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Notes for U.F.T. Address

On March 14, 1964, Dr. King was presented with the John Dewey Award by the United Teachers Federation. The address he delivered that day is outlined in this type-written draft along with his handwritten notes. In the draft, Dr. King emphasizes the importance of education, especially as a tool for African American advancement. He cites how the deprivation of education has been used as a way to systematically oppress African Americans and he asserts that this inequality is a reality that must be confronted. Dr.

Letter from Frank McRedmond to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Frank McRedmond suggests that Dr. King consider using the term "the economic defenseless" rather than "the poor," in order to gain support from the white community.

Correspondence Letter to Mrs. King from Paul Torres

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student expresses condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960

This telegram was sent from Benjamin Elijah Mays and his wife to Dr. King at the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bill Daniels

Friday, September 29, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Bill Daniels, of WSB-TV, expressing outrage over a cartoon depicting overt racism in a court of law.

Why We Can't Wait Book Cover

This draft of Why We Can't Wait contains sketches of a cover, table of contents and edits of the brief description.

Letter from Marvin T. Robinson to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967

Reverend Marvin T. Robinson, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, requests that Dr. King submit a written statement on personal stationary for the Souvenir Journal, a Seventy-Fifth Anniversary release issued by the Friendship Baptist Church.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Leon R. Martin

Monday, August 12, 1963

SCLC Director of Research and Information Harry Boyte communicates with Leon Martin to thank him for the thoughtful words made in response to Dr. King's article in "The New Leader." Boyte tells Martin that Negroes in America are at a place where they will no longer be forced to wait for equality. Boyte asserts that only the complete participation of Negroes in every part of life in America will "suffice at this juncture in history."

Letter from Nancy Claytor to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966

Nancy Claytor requests Dr. King's permission to use lines from "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" for the publication "The Methodist Student V-VI."

Letter from Albert Duff, Jr. to MLK

A former critic of Dr. King pledges allegiance to him after his bold and noble stance against the Vietnam War. Albert Duff, Jr. finally understands that color lines should not be a symbol of divisiveness. Duff feels that the world needs men of Dr. King's courage to speak from the Bible.

Letter from Chuck Barris to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Chuck Barris has received national monetary support for the truck rentals used for the Selma to Montgomery March.

Teacher Exchange

Thursday, December 17, 1964

The Darien Board of Education exchange program is under scrutiny, given claims that African American teachers integrating into the majority Caucasian Connecticut school district will be unqualified to teach.

A Tribute to the Organized Labor Movement

Tuesday, March 1, 1960

The Jewish Labor Committee extends heartfelt gratitude to the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO) for twenty-five years of fraternal cooperation.

Letter from Viva O. Sloam to CORE Members

Tuesday, June 19, 1962

Viva O. Sloam, sends a letter to members of the Congress for Racial Equality regarding integration in a Kentucky neighborhood.

Statement from MLK to Time Magazine

Friday, January 12, 1962

Dr. King writes to Time Magazine regarding the President's call for "new civil rights legislation." He expresses the unfortunate lack of originality in the President's statement on the issue and stresses the importance of executive action.

Resolution from the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference

Monday, April 8, 1968

This resolution, adopted by the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference, condemns the brutal assassination of Dr. King.

Reader Strikes Parallel Between America, Nazis

This document contains two letters to the editor of an unknown newspaper. The first letter is written by Edwin Johnson. He criticizes the war in Vietnam, making comparisons between the Nazis and the American military. E.D., the author of the second letter, also criticizes the war, calling for an end to the violence in Vietnam.

Letter from High School Senior Doris Magwood to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964

The senior class of Haut Gap School in John's Island, South Carolina invites Dr. King to deliver its baccalaureate sermon.

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. B. Wilson

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Dr. King conveys gratitude to Rev. C. B. Wilson of Southern Baptist Church for a contribution to SCLC. King explains the increasing expenses of the Civil Rights Movement at a time when liberals are redirecting their attention to the peace issue.

John Locke

Dr. King records a quote from English political theorist John Locke on the development of the human mind.

Letter of Condolence to Mrs. King and Children from Nagarajan and Family

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Dr. G. Nagarajan, a professor at Allen University in South Carolina, sent Mrs. King this letter to express sympathy following the death of Dr. King. The content of the letter compared Dr. King's philosophy and cause to Gandhi.

Letter from Mrs. David Bowen to MLK

Mrs. David Bowen suggests that SCLC start a poor people's campaign. She says that they should focus on a specific group of people instead if just problems in general. She also says that she and others will be willing to help when they know how to find the people who truly need it.

MLK Speech Outline

This document contains a preliminary speech outline by Dr. King. The topic of the talk is "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness," and in it Dr. King maintains that, "We must continue to courageously challenge the system of segregation."

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK Regarding March on Washington

Thursday, February 29, 1968

This document is a letter from Martha D. Kennedy to Dr. King in response to a previous letter from Dr. King in regards to a pilgrimage to Washington, D.C..

Letter from Berenice Wiggins to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Wiggins encloses a contribution to the SCLC. She also requests that Dr. King puts out an announcement so that listeners can tune into his radio broadcast on WLIB.

Sin

Dr. King notes that Genesis 5:24, 6:9 and 6:22 make it clear that sin is not universal.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King on behalf of The Campaign for Disarmament in West Germany to request a meeting with him while he is London. Ms. Duff references an earlier meeting with Dr. King in which he mentioned a projected trip to Europe in order to receive an Honorary Degree at Newcastle University. She informs him that the organization is interested in having him speak at a meeting on the war in Vietnam.

God

Dr. King notes that Jeremiah 9:23 speaks of man's ability to know and understand God in contrast to modern theology's claim that God is beyond knowing.

A Call To Action-Lucis Trust

Lucis Trust wrote this "Call To Action" about the vast greivances that were occuring in America, as it related to the issue of race. He identified that African Americans were "condemned to an inferior way of life and excluded as a human being." Trust conveyed that a remedy must be provided for the ongoing injustice. The remedy he proposed is that the attitudes of White Americans needed to change, not only on a non-discriminitory basis, but by creating an atmosphere of inclusivism and goodwill.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.