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"TANZANIA"

Church, Negro

Dr. King provides insight on the interaction between the church and the Negro youth.

Immortality

Dr. King cites the Old Testament Book of Isaiah regarding the topic of immorality.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Geraldine Fones

Friday, January 12, 1968

Ms. McDonald informs Ms. Fones that Dr. King will not be able to speak to the Oxford Union Society in London due to commitments in the United States around the same time frame.

God is a Spirit

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "God Is A Spirit" and lists three different meanings for that assertion.

Letter from MLK to the Lamar W. Sessoms Family

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Dr. King replies to the Sessoms' previous letter that requested assistance in alleviating racial inequality in Mississippi. King informs them that the first step is to "urge the struggle in our own community," and the second step is for everyone to "join together across the nation with people of good will and combat the evils of racism and injustice."

National Student Christian Federation Bulletin

Monday, February 29, 1960

The National Student Christian Federation released several bulletins and informational letters regarding the student demonstrations in the 1960s. Herluf Jensen, General Secretary of the NSCF, provides readers with the progress of different trials related to the movement, arrest statistics and institutions involved. Obtaining strong civil rights legislation through Congress is discussed as well.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

This pamphlet outlines the mission and objectives of SCLC's Citizenship Education Program. The program was designed to inform citizens about how to become full citizens in America. SCLC also addresses the recruitment of potential teachers to assist with the curriculum.

Letter from Hazel Olivier to MLK

Tuesday, February 1, 1966

Hazel H. Olivier of Chicago, in a letter dated February 1, 1966, asks Dr. King to help her retain an apartment building on Yale Avenue that she purchased in 1957. She lived there 5 years before being told there were serious violations. Three years after spending substantial funds and being informed by the inspector that everything was in compliance, she was cited with additional violations and told there were no reports of her earlier remedial actions. She wonders how the previous white owner was permitted to sell if there were violations. Mrs.

Letter from Robert Starbuck to the SCLC

Wednesday, May 19, 1965

Robert Starbuck encloses a contribution to the SCLC on behalf of supporters from Berlin, Germany. Starbuck has affiliations with many individuals tied to the American Civil Rights Movement and believes that it is imperative to contribute to the cause.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

Dr. King expresses his approval of an executive order outlawing discrimination in federally assisted housing. He states that this is a courageous action that is a giant leap towards freedom and democracy.

Letter from Carey B. Joynt to Rev. Carroll D. Payne

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

In this letter, dated June 20, 1967, Carey Joynt asks Rev. Carroll Payne to review her rough draft regarding the Vietnam War and Ramsey's ideas. She has simplified the arguments to the best of her abilities and hopes that Payne can offer suggestions for her draft.

Seventh Biennial Religious Conference

This is a program for the seventh Biennial Religious Conference at Princeton University. Initially conceived shortly after World War II, the conference continues to confront important issues of human life. Under the leadership of the Student Christian Association, "Integration: Conscience in Crisis" will take place over a span of four days. Topics of the conference include "the historical and social as well as the judicial, international, and theological" implications of segregation and integration.

Accepting the New York City Medallion Draft

Dr. King accepts the New York City Medallion on behalf of all persons, both black and white, involved in the fight for social justice and equality.

Desegregation and the Future

Saturday, December 15, 1956

This document contains the first eight pages of Dr. King's address at the annual luncheon of the National Committee for Rural Schools at New York's Commodore Hotel in 1956. In it, he condemns segregation as an evil which has been allowed to exist in American life for too many decades. Dr. King points out that many states now stand in opposition to desegregation, and the federal government and the Supreme Court must now face how to make this new legislation a reality.

Quote from AFL-CIO President George Meany

This is a picture of George Meany, President of AFL-CIO, giving an address to the Jewish Labor Committee meeting in Atlantic City, NJ on March 26, 1960. The picture is inscribed with a quote which reads: "What we want for ourselves, we want for all humanity."

Telegram from the SCLC to Rev. John Golden

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Staff from the SCLC and Citizenship Education Program telegram Reverend John Golden informing him that all expenses will be paid for the trip to Georgia.

Telegram from A. J. Gervantes to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Mayor Cervantes of St. Louis, invites Dr. King to participate in a conference entitled, "Tell It Like It Is."

Telegram from MLK and Mrs. King to Dr. Benjamin E. Mays

Dr. and Mrs. King commend Dr. Benjamin E. Mays for all he has accomplished during his twenty-seven years as President of Morehouse College.

Notecard on the Definition of Time

On this notecard, Dr. King explores the meaning of "Time" according to modern physics and philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books, and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King quotes Karl Barth's "Dogmatics in Outline" on Jesus and his relationship to God.

Reason and Faith

Dr. King writes a quote from William Spurrier's Guide to the Christian Faith.

State of New York Civil Rights Bureau - 1967 Annual Report

This is the overview of the advancements and achievements affiliated with the New York Civil Rights Bureau, in 1967.

Letter from Bonnie Scott to MLK

Bonnie Scott, a student at Lake Forest College, sends Dr. King a letter asking him for his bibliography as well as information about nonviolence for their senior thesis.

Letter from MLK to James M. Kangongoi

Monday, April 16, 1962

Dr. King writes Mr. James M. Kangongoi acknowledging the receipt of his letter and expressing how good it was to meet him in Puerto Rico.

Telegram from Mathew Ahmann to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Mathew Ahmann, on behalf of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, congratulates the Southern Christian Leadership Conference for a decade of leadership.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Thursday, December 9, 1965

After hearing Dr. King's speech at Billanova University, Mr. Brownlow requests that the Reverend speak at the Haverford School located in Pennsylvania. Secondarily, Brownlow requests that Dr. King send a few words of congratulations to a student attending the college.

Press Conference on the Chicago Movement

Wednesday, July 7, 1965

Dr. King and SCLC members have accepted the invitation to join the fight for a quality integrated education for the children of Chicago.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Earl White

Thursday, October 11, 1962

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Reverend Earl White for his participation in and support of the movement in Albany.

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

Letter from Richard P. Heath to MLK

Monday, November 29, 1965

Richard P. Heath expresses his distaste for Dr. King's method of attaining equal rights and freedoms. He posits, "In order to have rights and freedoms, we must be responsible for our actions."