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Letter from Joan Daves to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Joan Daves expresses her gratitude toward Mrs. King for her support of her husband throughout his work in the Civil Rights Movement, following his receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from Robert F. Kennedy to Wyatt Tee Walker

Monday, September 24, 1962

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy writes to Wyatt Tee Walker regarding the progress of the SCLC. Kennedy believes that the right to vote will eliminate "continued discrimination and injustice."

Chicago IL The New Crusader: "The World of Books"

Saturday, June 24, 1967

Under the heading "The World of Books", the New Crusader newspaper published this review of Dr. King's last book. The review touches on Dr. King's examination of the Black Power movement and its effect on racial tension in America.

Memorandum from Lillie Hunter to MLK

Lillie Hunter sends Dr. King a memorandum that breaks down the office conditions and decorum as well as recommendations for the SCLC.

Invitation From L. Rosenberger to MLK

Thursday, April 2, 1964

The First International Congress of Negro Culture invites Dr. King to their conference in Brazil.

Anonymous Support for MLK

Sunday, October 30, 1960

An anonymous individual expresses his or her support and concerns about Dr. King's affiliation with presidential candidate John F. Kennedy.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1961

Rev. Ralph Abernathy sends best wishes to Dr. King and everyone affiliated with the Civil Rights Movement. Rev. Abernathy is disheartened because he is not present to assist with the movement, but assures Dr. King that he wants to be an active participant.

Telegram from Simon Anekwe to MLK

Tuesday, December 19, 1967

Simon Anekwe urges Dr. King to visit Nigeria and states that Dr. King's intervention would save thousands.

Letter from Representative Stanley R. Tupper to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Maine Congressman Stanley R. Tupper acknowledges his receipt of Dr. King's telegram concerning the Washington D. C. Home Rule Bill. He informs Dr. King that he will sign the discharge petition for the bill if it remains obstructed by a committee for much longer.

Letter From Jane Hall to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Jane Hall writes Dr. King suggesting that there be a focus on equitable representation of the negro in television advertising in order to attain "maximum quality and quantity" of integration.

Waste in Foreign Aid

Sunday, February 19, 1967

Irene M. Kashmer suggests Dr. King address the issue of wasted foreign aid in his march on Washington. She encloses a New York Times article from February 15, 1967 to emphasize her point.

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Monday, April 26, 1965

Sister Mary Leoline reflects upon her participation in the Selma-Montgomery March as a positive experience.

Acceptance Letter from Rollan Henry of Tuskegee Institute to Scott B. Smith

Tuesday, January 11, 1966

In this letter, Mr.Henry informs Mr.Smith that he has been accepted to Tuskegee Institute.

New Books: January to July 1964

The publication company Hodder & Stoughton reviews Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

A Journey of Conscience

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on Rhodesia

Thursday, November 11, 1965

Dr. King urges President Johnson to respond to the unilateral declaration of independence by Prime Minister Ian Smith of Rhodesia by withdrawing American officials, refusing diplomatic recognition and severing economic ties.

Letter to Dora McDonald Regarding Persons Receiving Autographed Books

Thursday, June 29, 1967

Dora McDonald receives a list of names who are to receive autographed copies of Dr. King's book. The list consists of contributors to American Foundation on Nonviolence and SCLC.

Letter From Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler

Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler sends their support and best wishes to the S.C.L.C, C.O.R.E, and S.N.C.C for their efforts towards violence, Vietnam, and human dignity.

Man the Sinner

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from John Lazenby to MLK

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

John Lazenby, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, encloses a donation to Dr. King. He further stresses that nonviolence is the prime method to solve problems around the world. Lazenby requests copies of Dr. King's anti-war speech delivered at New York's Riverside Church on April 4, 1967 to distribute to his friends.

Telegram from John Conyers Jr. to MLK about a Meeting

In this telegram John Conyers, Jr. extends an invitation to Dr. King to attend a meeting for the discussion of black politics and related considerations. The meeting was to include Lerone Bennett, Julian Bond, Harry Belfonte, Richard Hatcher, Floyd McKissick, and Carl Stokes. Conyers also informs Dr. King of his itinerary and provides a number for him to be contacted.


Dr. King defines infralapsarianism.

March On Mississippi

Saturday, July 1, 1967

Florence Fyall describes a scene of violence on peaceful demonstrators in her poem entitled March On Mississippi."

Letter from MLK to Reverend Edward Hill

Tuesday, September 18, 1962

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the hospitality he received from Reverend Edward Hill during his visit at Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist Church. Dr. King offers prayers and best wishes for the continued success of Rev. Hill and his congregation.

Letter from Frederick E. Wallin to MLK

Sunday, March 1, 1964

Frederick E. Wallin, of Alderson-Broaddus College, invites Dr. King to debate Fulton Lewis III. The debate will be sponsored by the Young Americans for Freedom. Television and radio coverage will also be available.

MLK Postcard - American Negro Emancipation Centennial

Wednesday, January 1, 1964

The American Negro Emancipation Centennial issued this 1964 postcard containing Dr. King's brief biography. The postcard was designed to be used as a study guide in Negro history.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Poor

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

This letter, written under the pseudonym "A. Christian," criticizes Dr. King's work for the poor in the years following 1966. He states, "you have lost all respect for law and order what good do you think you are doing for the poor?" He further critiques Dr. King's public response to Communism and the Vietnam War.


Through quoting an unknown Christian, Dr. King calls for modern Christians to accept a personal challenge that will one day enable historians to declare that it was Christianity that held the world together.


Dr. King cites chapter 5, verse 7 of the Old Testament book of Job. This scripture highlights the fact that trouble is necessary in life.