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"TANZANIA"

Letter from MLK to Pasteur Jacques Martin

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
FRANCE

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Jacques Martin for his recent visit to Lyons, France. Dr. King also wishes to send greetings to some other associates there.

Letter from John Barber to Mrs. A.W. Boone

Monday, November 8, 1965
Atlanta, GA, BELGIUM

John Barber, Executive Assistant to Dr. King, thanks Mrs. Boone of Atlanta's Booker T. Washington High School for agreeing to find a "Negro youngster" to become the pen pal of "a young French correspondent." The pen pal request resulted from communication between Dr. King and Dominique Pire, a Nobel Peace Prize recipient and Belgian priest.

Letter from Swedish Members of Parliament to MLK

Sunday, April 24, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, Geneva, Switzerland, SWITZERLAND, NORWAY, DENMARK

Two members of Parliament in Stockholm, Sweden hope to establish a fund among Christian Social Democrats and other Swedish organizations to support the SCLC. They request Dr. King's presence at a meeting in Gothenburg.

Letter from Claudia Harris to MLK

Nebraska (NE), VIETNAM

Claudia Harris informs Dr. King that Dana College is participating in "Choice 68." She also requests material on Dr. King's position regarding the Vietnam War, civil rights, the urban crisis and the federal budget.

Letter from Sam Massell Jr. to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Sam Massell Jr., President of the City of Atlanta Board of Aldermen, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Great Man

Gene Lyle writes the editor of a newspaper article entitled "Americans Need Some Discipline" to address unjustified criticism expressed against Dr. King. The author is certain that the article persuaded some readers that Dr. King "is to be feared and despised" for being a contributor to civil unrest. However, the writer predicts that "Dr. King will enter American history...as one of the great men of all time."

Letter from MLK to Vice President Richard Nixon

Wednesday, January 11, 1956
Washington, D.C., AUSTRIA, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King and fellow clergymen commend Vice President Nixon on his work bringing attention to the suffering Hungarian refugees in Austria. They urge him to take a similar trip to the South and meet with the thousands of victims of racial oppression.

The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

GERMANY

In this column, Dr. King speaks of the outbreak of "Nazi-like degeneracy" less than 15 years after the Holocaust. He says that in spite of these evils, it should not discourage us from coming together as human beings, living in harmony and not letting the dangers of racism paralyze us as a world community.

Letter from Stacey McCloud to MLK

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

Stacey McCloud writes to Dr. King suggesting that he, Stokley Carmichael and others relocate to Africa and march.

Memo on Strategy of the Integration Movement

Birmingham, AL

An anonymous writer pens a comprehensive strategy that focuses on achieving racial integration. Within the text of the document, the writer identifies various political, social and economical developments that are needed in order to end racially stemmed inequalities for African Americans.

God - His Imminence

Dr. King takes notes on the immanence of God and quotes Victorian poet Alfred Tennyson's "The Higher Pantheism."

Relation Between Esthetics and Science

Dr. King writes notes regarding "The Relation Between Esthetics and Science." King cites several philosophers, psychologists, and scientists, and their different theories regarding science, mathematics, art, and esthetics.

Letter to Robert F. Kennedy from Dora McDonald

Thursday, May 4, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald writes Senator Kennedy to inform him that his recent letter to Dr. King came in his absence. She states that the letter will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return to the Atlanta office.

New Wars For Old

Alfred Noyes writes a poem entitled, "New Wars For Old." Mr. Noyes focuses on various aspects of life and repeatedly asks, "when have we prayed for peace."

William M. Kunstle writes to MLK About the Shuttlesworht-Phifer Case

Monday, December 16, 1963
New York, NY

William M. Kunstler sends Dr. King the decision marks from the Shutllesworth- Phifer case. The case resulted in a victory, but took five years to draw a decision.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from E.S. Baker

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
Atlanta, GA

E.S. Baker, manager of the Canadian National Railways, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy requesting a copy of Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech. He began the letter by noting that he was an avid admirer of Dr. King and interested in acquiring some of his other recordings.

MLK Writes Rev. Frank N. Williams Thanking Him for Support

Thursday, October 11, 1962
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King writes Rev. Williams and expresses his appreciation for his witness in Albany, Ga. He also apologizes for the time delay of the letter explaining that there was an accumulation of mail in his office. He goes on to say that the work that Rev. Williams has done was very important and will continue to be needed in the movement.

More and Faster

Sunday, January 5, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.

Report of A Participant

VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This report illustrates the authors concern and outlook on the Vietnam war.

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

Chicago, IL

The SCLC and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations (CCCO) issues a program addressing the goals of the Chicago Freedom Movement. The Chicago Freedom Movement is composed of a coalition of organizations who have decided to eradicate slums, ghettos and racism from the city.

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.

Letter from MLK to Jessie Treichler

Friday, September 7, 1962
Ohio (OH)

Dr. King writes Jessie Tresichler to inform her that he and his wife will be unable to accept her invitation to Antioch College. He explains that his calendar will not allow him to accept any more speaking engagements and that Coretta is an expecting mother.

The Montgomery Bus Boycott Story

Monday, December 31, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This dramatic story gives a riveting account of the Montgomery Bus Boycott movement and its aim to end segregation of the public transit in Montgomery, Alabama after the arrest of Rosa Parks. E.D. Nixon and other ministers illustrate the philosophy of nonviolent tactics employed by the Montgomery Improvement Association and their struggle for "cosmic companionship."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), ISRAEL

The author of this letter asks what Dr. King is doing for his people. He or she recommends the rich Negro people in the community help the poor just as the American Jewish community helped Israel.

Ritschl and Schleiermacher

Dr. King compares the thoughts of German theologian's Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from MLK to Peter S. Kliewer

Thursday, July 13, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

In response to a "letter to the editor" from the "Times-Advocate" sent in by a reader, Dr. King addresses America's role in Vietnam.

Letter from Leonard Kane to MLK

Monday, March 15, 1965
New York (NY)

Leonard Kane, Chairman of the Democratic Town Committee, sends Dr. King a financial contribution on behalf of the committee. He also expresses the importance of democracy for all.

Naturalism (Its Losing of the Individual)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from M. Carl Holman Regarding Equal Education Opportunity Conference

Thursday, November 9, 1967
Washington, D.C.

M. Carl Holman, the Director of the Equal Educational Opportunity in America's Cities, a conference of the United States Commission on Civil Rights, writes to the conference partic-ipants, Dr. King included. Carl Holman writes that this conference was specifically requested by President Johnson following the Commission's report on racial isolation in public schools.