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"TANZANIA"

Letter from Mrs. R.B. Hassell to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Writing from Memphis, Tennessee, Mrs. Hassell expresses her love for America and her concern regarding the cruel treatment many have experienced throughout the world. She offers encouragement to Dr. King and other preachers who are advocates for peace.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Blicksilver

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

Dr. King thanks Blicksilver for his contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges the impact of such support in improving race relations throughout the nation.

To the Negroes of America

Robert Welch compares the American Negro Population to Negro populations around the world in regards to ownership of various consumer items. He asserts that Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther are shameless liars working in league with communists.

Letter from Larry M. Otter & Alan Aftanski to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

Mount Saint Mary's College's Young Democratic and Young Republican Clubs inform Dr. King of their preparation for the National Collegiate Primary, Choice '68. Dr. King has been named a candidate in the mock election, so the organizers request information about his views. They also tell Dr. King that a speaking engagement can be arranged if Dr. King's schedule brings him to the Maryland area.

MLK Sermon About Courage and Cowardice

The document is a single draft page from Dr. King's larger work "Strength to Love," with annotations handwritten by Dr. King. On this page, he discusses courage and self-affirmation.

National Emergency Action Committee Meeting Agenda

Tuesday, February 14, 1967

This document states that the Provisional Executive Committee of the National Emergency Action Committee will meet in Chicago on Wednesday, February 22, 1967. The document then givies the meeting agenda.

Letter from Benjamin Conklin to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Mr. Conklin writes this letter urging Rev. Abernathy to rethink the decision to proceed with the Peoples March on Washington. He is concerned that with the recent assassination of Dr. King this action will only alienate Congress and the American public. Hence the march could cause more bloodshed.

Letter from the Associated Negro Press to MLK

Saturday, November 27, 1965

Donald Kittell, an administrative assistant for the Associated Negro Press, writes to Dr. King regarding his four "My Dream" columns. Enclosed in the letter is a copy of each column. Dr. King writes on a variety of topics such as social justice, equality, nonviolence and the progress of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Thomas Scroth to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King receives an invitation to the Forum Committee dinner in Washington, DC. This correspondence provides details of the format and location of the event.

Letter from Sandra Greenia to MLK

Monday, November 4, 1963

Sandra Greenia requests that Dr. King send her some information regarding integration. She emphasizes that she gained a lot by living in various integrated U.S. Naval Bases.

Letter from William M. Gray to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

William Gray offers his prayers and support as Rev. Abernathy takes over command of the SCLC following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Mrs. Bill Green to MLK

Monday, May 27, 1963

Mrs. Bill Green, an uneducated white woman, informs Dr. King on the spiriutal words she has recieved from God. Mrs. Green asserts that she recieved this insight after she envisioned the struggle Dr. king has endured. She lists four ideas surrounding the lack of collectivity amongst the races and the acknowledgment of the power of prayer.

Letter from Thomas C. McGarth to MLK

Wednesday, September 22, 1965

Congressman Thomas C. McGarth writes to Dr. King concerning recent challenges surrounding the seating of the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. McGarth discusses his involvement with the voting process.

Worship

Dr. King provides a definition of worship.

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Public Meeting

Monday, August 10, 1964

Dr. King is listed as the keynote speaker for the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Forty-First Boule on August 10, 1964.

Letter from Sylvester Webb to MLK

Thursday, December 23, 1965

Sylvester Webb, Sponsor of the Sixth Grade Graduating Class Gift for Edward Gideon Public School in Philidelphia, informs Dr. King that an oil portrait of him was commissioned by sixth grade class. Webb request King's appearance or one of his advisers for the ceremony to place the portrait in the school lobby. Dr. King would later send Reverend Walter Fauntroy of the SCLC's Washington bureau to represent him.

Opportunity, Fidelity, and Reward

Friday, January 1, 1954

This handwritten outline reflects a sermon delivered by Dr. King at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in January of 1954. The sermon is structured around "The Parable of the Talents" taken from Matthew 25:14-30. Dr. King highlights how the passage assures a "reward for faithfulness."

Letter from MLK to Richard V. Grulich

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Mr. Grulich regarding U.S. foreign policy, asserting that the federal government needs to develop the "moral courage" to admit past mistakes.

Itinerary for MLK

In this correspondence, a list of "appearances" for Dr. King is listed.

Letter from Margaret Long to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Margaret Long asks Dr. King to reconsider his plans for the demonstration in Washington, D.C. She expresses that though she understands why Dr. King advocates for demonstrations, she does not believe it will be advantageous.

Letter from Ruth Olsen to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 6, 1964

Ruth Olsen of St. Ansgar's Lutheran Church writes Dora McDonald requesting 30 copies of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Public Statement at the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

Wednesday, July 22, 1964

Dr. King speaks at a rally held for the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Dr. King stresses the importance of government assistance in protecting African Americans citizens from violent actions when registering and voting during elections. In areas such as Mississippi where harassment and murders took place frequently, African Americans were in dire need of a political party that was free of racism so that they could fairly be represented in a prejudice society.

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

Request for Help

Monday, November 6, 1967

Marcellus M. Harper requests assistance from Dr. King in relation to economic improvement. In his letter of appeal, Mr. Harper requests that Dr. King speaks on gossip, unity, improving conditions and ways of living, and economic improvement.

Letter from MLK to Delta Sigma Theta

Monday, January 30, 1967

This letter is in response to and appreciation of a contribution in the amount of $150 made, to the SCLC, by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority.

Letter from Weston E. Vivian to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965

Congressman Weston Vivian responds to Dr. King's letter regarding the seating of the Mississippi Congressman. He tells Dr. King that he not only supported the "Ryan fairness resolution" to prevent the seating, but also voted against the motion to swear in the Congressman. Although he mentions that he was in the minority regarding this matter, he assures Dr. King that he will continue to "work for the opening of the Mississippi registration and election procedures."

Mass Meeting on Washington Poor People's Campaign

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

This program outlines the structure of a mass meeting led by the SCLC at Vermont Avenue Baptist Church in Washington, D.C. Among the speakers in attendance were Rev. Ralph David Abernathy and Dr. King.

Letter from Richard Beal to MLK

Saturday, January 21, 1967

Mr. Beal informs Dr. King that he believes the best way for African Americans to gain the support of Caucasian Americans is for them to earn their respect.

Telegram from C.K. Steele to MLK

Saturday, October 22, 1960

Rev. Steele expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's career and assures Dr. King that he is not walking alone.

Letter from Harry G. Boyte to Leon R. Martin

Monday, August 12, 1963

SCLC Director of Research and Information Harry Boyte communicates with Leon Martin to thank him for the thoughtful words made in response to Dr. King's article in "The New Leader." Boyte tells Martin that Negroes in America are at a place where they will no longer be forced to wait for equality. Boyte asserts that only the complete participation of Negroes in every part of life in America will "suffice at this juncture in history."