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Letter to the Managers of "Christianity Today'' from Rev Earl E. Josten

Saturday, June 17, 1967

In this letter, dated June 17, 1967, Josten writes to the managers of "Christianity Today" to inform them that he cannot comply with their request for names. He is not complying because of the attitude Christianity Today's editor is taking toward Dr. King. Rev. Josten is a pastor at The Methodist Church in Columbus Junction, Iowa. Josten offers prayer to the editor for his "terrible tirade" against King, and states that he will not commend this paper to any more friends if this attitude continues.

Letter from Polly M. Williams to Whom it May Concern

Sunday, January 29, 1967

Polly Williams, a former counselor of the Neighborhood Youth Corps, requests a full investigation of its director, Mr. Pace. Mrs. Williams requested a sick leave while undergoing surgery, yet later discovered that her request had counted as vacation time. She discusses numerous orders she received from Mr. Pace that negatively impacted her health and her recovery from surgery. She believes that she is a victim of racial discrimination in the workplace.

Mixed Marriage

This illustration, created by Reg Manning, depicts Dr. King presiding over an interracial marriage between the Civil Rights Movement and "Veatnik War Protests." This drawing was published in the "Arizona Republic."

Five Denominations of Protestants Said To Ignore Negroes

This article discusses a claim brought against "five influential Protestant denominations" by members of the Rockefeller Fund for Theological Education. Specifically referenced is Rev. Dr. C. Shelby Rooks, Executive secretary of the fund, who is reported as saying that the American Baptist Convention, the Episcopal, the Methodist, the United Presbyterian Churches, and the United Church of Christ discriminated against African Americans "from the centers of denominational power and decision making." Dr.

Schleiermacher (What Is Revelation)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Shattered Dreams and Unfulfilled Hopes

Dr. King based this sermon on unfulfilled hopes and dreams. He focused on the story of the Apostle Paul and his wish to journey to Spain. Paul did eventually go to Spain but "as a prisoner and not as a free man." Dr. King told his congregation that they all faced unfulfilled dreams at some point in their lives.

Laughable Comics Postcard from Johnny B.

The author Johnny B. provides his best wishes to the recipient of this post card, stating "God created everybody equal."

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

I Have A Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Dr. King delivered the "I Have A Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. Along with Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address," it is considered to be one of the greatest speeches of all time.

Pessimism

Dr. King quotes John Hodgdon Bradley from an article in the December 1932 Atlantic Monthly, “Letter from a Scientist to a Priest.”

Letter from Silvio Romoaldo to MLK

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

Silvio Romoaldo sends Dr. King his support for the Civil Rights Movement and the efforts against the Vietnam War.

A Union Treasurer Writes MLK Regarding the SCLC Convention

Thursday, July 8, 1965

Cleveland Robinson, Secretary Treasurer of AFL-CIO District 65 Retail, Wholesale and Department Store Union, writes to Dr. King with several suggestions for the upcoming SCLC convention.

MLK's Recommendation Letter for Alan Wachtel

This original letter was handwritten and initialed by Dr. King for Alan Wachtel, who he was recommending for law school.

Letter from Mrs. Phyllis Nissel to MLK

Phyllis Nissel congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She remembers hearing his speech at the March on Washington and appreciates Dr. King's ability to represent the voices of so many.

Greetings Page-SCLC and ACMHR

The SCLC and the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights come together to host SCLC's annual convention in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. Lamm

Friday, October 30, 1964

Joan Daves corresponds with a German citizen regarding a recent request to submit Dr. King's book Why We Can't Wait to a German publisher.

Notecard Containing the Definition of Thinking

This notecard quotes Dr. Brightman's definition of thinking, taken from "An Intro to Philosophy".

Eutychius

Dr. King gives brief biographical detail on Eutychius.

Telegram from R.C. Bell to Ivan Allen

Monday, March 25, 1963

In this telegram to Mayor Allen of Atlanta, Dr. Bell protests the Dental Society. The Dental Society is scheduled to meet at the Municipal Auditorium on a segregated basis. Dr. Bell reminds Mayor Allen that the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled such segregation illegal.

Letter from John Yungblut to MLK

Monday, January 16, 1961

John Yungblut writes to Dr. King to confirm his ability to lead a seminar for the Atlanta Meeting's Quaker House on the Philosophy and Practice of Non-violence.

Bayard Rustin Statement on Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Baynard Rustin notes the recent violence against three Negro male volunteers in the voter registration drive. Mr. Rustin describes the death of these men as acts that violate the "constitutional rights" of the Negro people. In the hopes of Mr. Rustin, this occurence will initiate a new force of the nonviolent movement.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock

Saturday, April 9, 1966

Dr. King expresses his most sincere gratitude for Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock's support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from B. Hicks to Herbert Coulton

Tuesday, August 3, 1965

B. Hicks telegrams Herbert Coulton stating that he will pay for his transportation and expenses during his visit.

Letter from Constance A. Price to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

In this letter, Ms. Price writes to Dr. King to request that he makes mention of the blatant injustices committed by the State of Colorado, to its citizens, during the "poor people's campaign" in Washington, D.C.

Letter from MLK to Brothers-in-Christ

Friday, February 28, 1964

Dr. King requests the participation of those receiving the letter. He encourages members of congregations to attend the Freedom Rally and urges churches to partake in Freedom Sunday.

Schleiermacher (The Immanence of God)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Rhoda Dorsey to MLK

Thursday, May 21, 1964

Rhoda Dorsey, Dean and Associate Professor of History at Goucher College, informs Dr. King that they have included "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" on the freshman class reading list.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Abram Heschel

Friday, March 29, 1968

Harry Wachtel, legal counsel to Dr. King, expresses his gratitude to leading Jewish theologian Rabbi Heschel for his great works.

MLK Style Sheet: Why We Can't Wait

Here we see what is known as a style sheet for Dr. King's third book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King's book was published in 1964 following the success of the infamous SCLC Birmingham desegregation campaign.