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Letter from MLK to Rev. Theall

Dr. King states that he is regretful to hear of Rev. Theall's circumstance and recommends that he contact Attorney Jack Greenberg, Chief Council of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Temporary Injunction Filed Against Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

This is a legal document for a temporary injunction filed by the city of Birmingham against Wyatt Tee Walker.

Letter from Dr. Alex Hershaft to MLK

Saturday, June 24, 1967

Dr. Alex Hershaft writes to Dr. King to tell him he is happy to make a donation now that Dr. King has aligned himself against the war in Vietnam. Rather than having to choose between donating to civil rights or anti-war causes, Dr. Hershaft can donate to Dr. King and accomplish both.

Letter from TIME Magazine to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

James Shepley, publisher of TIME Magazine, thanks Dr. King for his editorial contributions to the magazine in the past year.

Letter from Marguerite Munson to MLK

Wednesday, September 14, 1966

Mrs.Munson writes Dr.King to ask for his assistance in finding a lawyer that is not corrupted by the government.

Blank Jury Questionnaire to MLK

This Jury Questionaire was sent to Dr. King by The Fulton County Court House.

Letter from Hano Bailey to MLK

Friday, December 22, 1967

Hano Bailey praises Dr. King for asking black athletes "to sit out of the Olympics." He informs Dr. King that there are 15 teachers at his University writing letters to their relatives in support of Dr. King's campaign.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to Coretta King

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

Sargent Shriver, American statesmen, activist, founder of Job Corps and Peace Crops, expresses gratitude for Mrs. King's public endorsement of the war against poverty.

Letter from Philip Hart to Mr. Glen E. Aldrich

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

In this letter, Senator Philip Hart comments on the First Amendment and Dr. King's future march.

Letter from Dora McDonald to L. N. W. Christian

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dora McDonald writes Mr. Christian on Dr. King's behalf. She acknowledges his disagreement with Dr. King's philosophy and refers him to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for answers to his questions.

Proposal to Save War-Burned and War-Injured Vietnamese Children

The Committee of Responsibility sponsors an initiative to transport children from deplorable hospitals in Vietnam to the U.S. Plans also include enlisting help from governmental agencies, as well as collecting funds and support from the American people.

Letter from George Russell to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

George Russel offers his support for any endeavor Dr. King would assign him.

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.

Letter from David Caputo to MLK

Saturday, June 22, 1963

David Caputo extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at Miami University. Mr. Captuo requests that Dr. King responds in a timely manner so that honorarium can be negotiated.

Review on "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

The Virginia Kirkus Review wrote this descriptive review on Dr. King's final book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? The context of the review shows differences between the messages of Dr. King's earlier works and Where Do We Go From Here. Dr. King's earlier publications focused on the work of gaining decent treatment and basic civil rights for black Americans. However, this book heavily challenged the status quo in America.

Telegram from MLK to Elijah Muhammed

Monday, August 14, 1967

Dr. King commends Muhammad Ali's conscientious objection to the Vietnam War. He encourages Elijah Muhammed to convince Ali to speak at the upcoming Tenth Annual Convention of SCLC.

Letter from Charles Woodall to MLK

Monday, February 8, 1965

Charles Woodall, representing the All Souls Unitarian Church of Santa Cruz, California, congratulates Dr. King on his efforts in the fight for freedom. Woodall explains that he is a Georgia native that once lived in Selma, Alabama in the early 1900's. At the time of this letter the SCLC and SNCC were in the middle of a massive Negro voter registration campaign in Selma, Alabama.

Sentinel: "King's Book Refutes Black Power"

Thursday, June 22, 1967

This document is a newspaper clipping from the Los Angeles Sentinel,l giving a review of Dr. King's book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community. Headlined under the title, "King's Book Refutes Black Power", the book review places special emphasis on Dr. King's objection of black power as a slogan. In his book, Dr. King informed his readers that the paths of black and white individuals intersected towards equality and black power totally killed that process.

Letter from Robert T. Stafford to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Congressman Robert T. Stafford writes to Dr. King acknowledging receipt of a recent request to support a particular bill. Stafford asserts that he will respect the majority rule of the District of Columbia and possibly revisit the petition at a later date.

Descartes

Dr. King quotes Rene Descartes' discovery of his famous principle. The idea, "I think, therefore I am," Descartes says, is essential, irrefutable and fitting to be the first principle of his philosophy.

Letter from Nathaniel L. Hawthorne to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Nathaniel Lee Hawthorne, who describes himself as “a nonviolent militant Negro” from rural Virginia, asks Dr. King for advice on publishing a book. Hawthorne wants to tell the nation what it feels like to be poor

Notecard Containing the Definition of Evil

In this notecard Dr. King details the reason for suffering. He references notes from "City of God" by St. Augustine.

Letter from Louise Boyer to Mrs. Arthur Logan

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Louise Boyer writes on behalf of Governor Nelson Rockefeller informing Mrs. Arthur Logan that a contribution check is enclosed for the SCLC.

Plans for Progress: Atlanta Survey

The Southern Regional Council releases a special report regarding Atlanta's "Plans for Progress," a program that gives the President's Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity power to require contractors to eliminate discrimination in the workplace. According to a study, only three of the twenty-four firms appeared to be interested in abiding by the "Plans for Progress." These were Lockheed, Western Electric Company, and Goodyear.

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.

Letter from Thomas Brown to MLK

Tuesday, August 6, 1963

Thomas Brown, III, the Chairman of the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia, sends a follow up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak. Brown attempts to appeal to Dr. King by listing prominent individuals that have previously spoke for the organization.

God (Niebuhr Conception)

Dr. King quotes American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regarding the subject of God.

Letter from Jane Dahlberg to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967

New York University Dean Jane Dahlberg congratulates Dr. King for taking a noble position against the Vietnam War. As a result of his participation in the New York anti-war demonstration, Dahlberg believes that his example of nonviolence was highly emphasized during the march.

Letter from Marcel Bernfeld to MLK

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

Mr. Bernfeld writes Dr. King, letting him know that he published some of his work. He also asks Dr. King's permission to publish the "Letter from Birmingham Jail," in its entirety, with an introduction and notes. He encloses copies of his own speech for Dr. King's reading pleasure and expresses his well-wishes in closing.

Flyer for SCLC Mass Meeting

This flyer advertises a 1958 Norfolk, VA SCLC mass meeting.