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Letter from Moe Foner to a Friend

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
New York (NY), Chicago, IL

Moe Foner is writing in regards to a new publication called, "Labor Voice For Peace." The issue mentioned covers the conference of labor leaders held in Chicago. Foner also asked for any comments concerning the publication.

Plowshare Pledge from Sargent Shriver

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Indiana (IN), VIETNAM

This Plowshare Pledge, signed by Sargent Shriver, vows to use voting powers to have the savings of the military expenses invested in domestic human resources.

Statement of Wisdom

Dr. King references a quote from Aldous Huxley's "Ends and Means" regarding wisdom.

Letter to Dr. King from Mrs. Beckler

Connecticut (CT), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Beckler encloses five dollars in a support letter to Dr. King, wishing the best for his health and asking for an autographed copy of one of his books.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Dr. and Mrs. Sullivan Jackson

Selma, AL

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to Dr. and Mrs. Sullivan in the passing of Mrs. Portlock. The King's highlight Mrs. Portlock's positive attributes and her great inspirational influence.

SCLC Pamphlet- Why?

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This brochure highlights the various forms of discrimination African Americans faced in Alabama, primarily the legal right to vote. Housing, unemployment, and police brutality are other key topics discussed. There is also a call to action on solutions for these problems.

Letter from Harry Daniels to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968
Washington, D.C., FRANCE

This letter from Mr. Harry Daniels to Dr. King addresses, among other things, Medicare, the upcoming presidential election, and government lending.

Letter from C.G. Gomillion to Dr. Randolph Blackwell

Wednesday, August 18, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Tuskegee, AL, Selma, AL

C.G. Gomillion writes Dr. Randolph Blackwell requesting reimbursement for paying the bail to release SCLC driver Walter Franklin. Franklin was arrested and released in Tuskegee, but was arrested again in Selma because the SCLC failed to pay his fine.

Telegram from MLK to Honorable Daniel Evans

Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes to the Honorable Daniel Evans requesting that he intercede in the controversy resulting from Washington State's conservation law and a 111-year old treaty.

Atheism

Dr. King ponders atheism by quoting a short anecdote of L.P. Jacks' shoemaker.

Letter from Victor J. Schoenbach to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Victor Schoenbach writes Dr. King expressing his support for Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War in the midst of dissenters.

Statement to SCLC Board About Alabama Boycotts

Friday, April 2, 1965
Baltimore, MD

In this statement, Dr. King explains the need for a boycott of the state of Alabama because of extreme violence and police overreaction, which he calls "totalitarian."

Letter from Leroy Benefield to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
Texas (TX)

Mr. Benefield requests information on how Dr. King prepared his Old Testatment sermons.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Hugh D. Daugherty

Wednesday, February 14, 1968
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King, in this correspondence, took the opportunity to thank Mr. Hugh Daugherty for his contribution to SCLC. He apologized for the delay in response, due to receiving numerous mail, while at the same time being short staffed. Furthermore, the letter acknowledged that Mr. Daugherty's contribution assisted in helping SCLC staff focus on voter registration in the South and working in the ghettos of the North.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Blicksilver

Tuesday, January 17, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Blicksilver for his contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges the impact of such support in improving race relations throughout the nation.

God in Isaiah

Dr. King cites Isaiah 55: 8,9 on the holiness and transcendence of God and distinguishes this from an anthropomorphic view of God.

Letter from MLK to Raymond Beard

Friday, November 26, 1965
Cleveland, OH, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Raymond Beard for his statement on peace and Christianity. He believes that the Fellowship of Reconciliation can distribute Beard's message to fellow clergyman around the country. In Dr. King's view, "...we must embark upon positive programs of international aid and amity to strenghten the bonds of world community and to eliminate the conditions which historically have led nations to start wars."

Letter from MLK to Sammy Davis Jr.

New York (NY), Chicago, IL

In this handwritten telegram draft, Dr. King informs Sammy Davis Jr. that his concerts in Chicago will not interfere with the movement. Dr. King goes on to suggest that one of Sammy Davis Jr.'s concerts be a benefit show for the Chicago Freedom Movement.

To the Gallant Black Man Now Dead

Tuesday, May 17, 1966
VIETNAM, Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This poem titled "To The Gallant Black Men Now Dead" was written by Vincent Harding in dedication to Jimmy L. Williams. Private First Class Williams was an heroic black man killed in Vietnam and was refused burial in his hometown of Wetumpka, Alabama.

Telegram from the Church of Sweden to MLK

Tuesday, March 3, 1964
Stockholm, Sweden

The Church of Sweden invites Dr. King to take part in a great church event in the fall of 1964. The church assures Dr. King that all expenses will be paid for his travel and the archbishop of Sweden will provide him with the official invitation letter.

Spring Mobilization Background Material

New York, NY, San Francisco, CA, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam announces Dr. King as its speaker for their April 15 march. In addition, this document offers background information on the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Rachelle Horowitz to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 7, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Georgia (GA), New York, NY

Administrative Secretary for the A. Phillip Randolph Institute, Rachelle Horowitz apologizes to Dora McDonald for an apparent misunderstanding regarding pamphlet pricing.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Irving J. Block

Monday, May 16, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald requests Rabbi Irving J. Block contact Stanley Levison, Dr. King's attorney in New York City.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Thursday, December 9, 1965
Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

After hearing Dr. King's speech at Billanova University, Mr. Brownlow requests that the Reverend speak at the Haverford School located in Pennsylvania. Secondarily, Brownlow requests that Dr. King send a few words of congratulations to a student attending the college.

Letter from William Ferguson to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Texas (TX)

William Ferguson of Prairie View, Texas extends an invitation for Dr. King to address the community. The community of Prairie View is engaged in a multiracial boycott with the aid of many white ministers. They seek Dr. King's appearance to give vitality to their movement.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to the Mapp and Welch Families

Thursday, February 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. Coretta Scott King express their condolences to the Mapp and Welch Families, and the West Hunter Street Baptist Church.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Casper I. Glenn

Monday, October 21, 1963
Arizona (AZ), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to Rev. Glenn, President of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, regarding Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech. Dr. King informs him that the Motown Record Corporation has been granted rights of this speech.

The Future of Integration

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, EGYPT, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Thank you letter from George R. Metcalf to MLK

Thursday, October 5, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Metcalf, president of the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, thanks Dr. King for joining the Advisory Council. Mr. Metcalf expresses his belief that Dr. King's participation on the council "will greatly strengthen the National Committee in its efforts to attain equal opportunity in housing."

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission Report

New York (NY), Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA

This report details a statistical count of Jewish communities being discriminated against according to a market research that was conducted by the Office of Economic Opportunity.