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Return Address Request

GRE requests an address from MLK to send a copy of his test scores.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the German edition of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", published by Econ Verlag, for the period 1/1/65 to 12/31/65.

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

Outline for "Levels of Love"

In this handwritten outline, Dr. King highlights the subject of love. The document titled, “Levels of Love," focused on four categories: utilitarian love, romantic love, humanitarian love and Christian love.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK encluding copy of British magazine SLANT

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has enclosed a copy of the British magazine SLANT that has a shortened version of his Riverside Church address inside.

Anthropology

Dr. King outlines and references ideas on anthropology.

Letter to MLK from Marie King

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

Marie King writes to express her support for Dr. King.

Telegram from Marvin Rich to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Marvin Rich informs Dr. King of a resolution that was adopted at a recent conference. The resolution called for a summit of civil rights leaders.

Letter from Apuyva J. Mehta to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

Written on the day of Mahatma Gandhi's birthday, Mehta requests Dr. King's autograph.

Letter from Charles and Leslie Gray to MLK about Contribution

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

In this letter, the Grays send an enclosed contribution to Dr. King in support of his "approach in the civil rights movement."

Letter from Michael J. Gerstley to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963

Michael J. Gerstley desires to continue to legacy of his grandfather's, Dr. Samuel Loebenstein, autograph collection from over 1500 prominent leaders. Dr. Loebenstein's collection is unique because he would request the leaders to sign over a stamp that correlated with their vocation. Mr. Gerstley provides Dr. King with a stamp of George Washington Carver to carry on his grandfather's collection.

Letter from John Whyte to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966

John Whyte, an eighth grader, describes his class's fundraising efforts for the SCLC.

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.

America

Dr. King quotes a statement from American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regarding the country's "historic situation in which the paradise of domestic security is suspended in a hell of global insecurity."

Letter from MLK Regarding Southern Christian Leadership Conference

In this letter, Dr. King appeals to the potential donors of the S.C.L.C. Dr. King also highlights a number of activities the S.C.L.C. has organized with the purpose of securing voting rights and raising funds for churches burned by segregationists.

Telegram from Andrew Hieskell and A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Dr. King receives this telegram from Mr. Heiskell and Mr. Randolph regarding the newly appointed chief executive of the National Urban Coalition.

Letter from S. Leiss to MLK

Saturday, March 6, 1965

The Joan Daves Agency sends Dr. King a check from Oxford University Press for royalties associated with the reprint of "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in Alpheus T. Mason's "Free Government in the Making."

Letter from MLK to Edwin D. Hoffman

Tuesday, December 29, 1964

Dr. King informs Dr. Edwin Hoffman of his inability to speak at the American Forum in West Virginia. Dr. King states that he will be focusing more attention to the Civil Rights and may not be available to speak at many events due to his limited schedule.

Letter from J. E. Hale to MLK

In this letter Hale criticizes Dr. King for being seen with Ertha Kitt asserting that Dr. King likes any type of publicity.

Letter from Welton B. Smith to MLK

Wednesday, March 23, 1966

The 376 and 400 National Veterans Association request Dr. King as a speaker for their Sixth National Reunion Convention in an effort to become an active organization in the struggle for equal rights. The convention chairman, Welton M. Smith, informs Dr. King that a $300 donation would be distributed upon the acceptance of this speaking engagement.

Letter from Senator Hugh Scott to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

US Senator Hugh Scott, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for the Reverend's letter of recent date. In addition, Scott reveals that he sponsored the Civil Rights legislation long before the present act was introduced. Scott also expresses that he would enjoy speaking with Dr. King during his next visit in Washington, D. C.

Albany Student Penalty Stressed

Approximately 40 African American students were suspended from school and charged for participating in mob action. The students were suspended for taking part in an anti-segregation demonstration to Albany City Hall. The demonstration included White students as well but they were not punished for their actions. The 40 students planned to appeal their cases to the federal court.

American Nurses' Association Names Judges for Integration Award

Friday, September 1, 1967

The American Nurses' Association announces its panel of judges for the 1968 Mary Mahoney Award, which honors progress in integration and nursing.

The Cold War: The Insanity of Deterrence

This brochure depicts a child asking "mommy, what's an H bomb?" and serves as anti-nuclear war propaganda.

Letter from Alice Glaser to MLK

Wednesday, June 26, 1963

Alice Glaser, Assistant Editor for Esquire Magazine, requests that Dr. King write an article entitled "A Day in a Southern Jail" regarding the actual details of his incarceration in the Birmingham jail.

Letter from James R. Herrington to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

James R. Herrington wrote this adverse letter to Dr. King, calling both him and his doctrine of civil disobedience "trash." Herrington ends his letter by saying that President Johnson cared more for Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement than the rest of the country, and therefore, won't be president again.

Letter from L. D. Reddick to Colleagues

Monday, November 21, 1966

L. D. Reddick's colleagues received this letter pertaining to the business of Dr. King's papers and where they should be housed.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

MLK Interview: The Negro Protest

Kenneth B. Clark conducts a televised interview with Dr. King, James Baldwin, and Malcolm X. Clark discusses with Dr. King his personal history, the relationship between the love ethic and nonviolent direct action, Malcolm X's claim that nonviolence is perceived by white leaders as weakness, and Baldwin's concern that Negroes will not remain nonviolent if met with brutal responses.