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Dr. King cites passages in the sixth century BCE Second Isaiah (chapters 40-55) as the first clear evidence of monotheism.

Postcard from Frank J. Meinen to the SCLC

Sunday, April 8, 1962

Upon recently hearing Dr. King speak, Frank J. Meinen writes the SCLC to ask how he can help.

Facing Life's Inescapables

Dr. King uses an allegory regarding life to express that if an individual follows God's plan they will live an abundantly happy life.

Letter from Anne Braden to A.D. King

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Joe Mulloy will be highlighted in a set of galley proofs for a story in the February issue of The Southern Patriot. Anne Braden informs Reverend A.D. King of the induction refusal by Mr. Mulloy and how it correlates to many SCLC staff members. Mrs. Braden is sending the letter to Dr. King as well and hopes that Rev. A.D. King will participate in this action.

Knudson, Albert

Dr. King references Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of Redemption."

Letter from MLK to Rev. W.C. Dobbins

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King informs Rev. Dobbins that he is unable to meet with him in the next few months, but possibly will be able to in the coming spring.

MLK's 'People to People' Column on Education

Saturday, May 15, 1965

This article by Dr. King appeared in the New York Amsterdam News. He discusses the segregation of schools and how it is harming African American children and their opportunities.

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.

What Is Man?

This excerpt from Dr. King's book entitled "The Measure of Man" defines the physical and spiritual doctrines of Man. The passage highlights the sinful nature of human beings.

Telegram from Charles Morris to MLK

Mr. Morris, president of The Negro Business and Industrial Association, extends an invitation to Dr. King to participate in an initiative designed to combat the rioting in Negro communities.

Letter from Irving Davis to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Irvin Davis of Celebrities Art Exhibits invites Dr. King to tour with the organization depending on his artistic abilities.


Dr. King notes that the psalmist’s view of man in Psalms 12:1 seems to indicate that there are no longer godly men.

Letter from Walter E. Sanford to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

Walter Sanford, Labor Adviser for the United States Department of Labor, writes Dora McDonald regarding Mr. John Dube's visit to Atlanta. In Dr. King's absence, Dube will meet with his Executive Assistant, Wyatt T. Walker, to discuss the structure of the SCLC and techniques employed to "promote improved civil rights for the Negroes in the US."

The World's March Toward Human Rights

Thursday, May 28, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issue of Equal Justice Under the Law at a convocation of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter fromJitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Friday, December 27, 1963

Jituso Morikawa expresses his delight that Dr. King will make an attempt to alter his schedule to speak in Atlantic City to the American Baptist Jubilee Advance.

Invitation from C.W. De Kiewiet to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Cornell William De Kieweit invites Dr. King to speak as the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecturer at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Mr. De Kieweit explains the civil rights struggle in South Africa and explains that Dr. King's appearance would be of great help.

Letter from Representative Thomas G. Morris to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

New Mexico Congressman Thomas Morris writes Dr. King to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram requesting Morris' opposition to House Bill 585, which would dismiss five recently elected members. Morris does not indicate his position in the matter.

Letter from L. D. Reddick to Colleagues

Monday, November 21, 1966

L. D. Reddick's colleagues received this letter pertaining to the business of Dr. King's papers and where they should be housed.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Letter from Dudley Babcock to MLK

Saturday, October 14, 1967

Dudley P. Babcock writes to Dr. King to assure him he supports his civil rights leadership but questions his involvement in the Vietnam War protests. Babcock reminds Dr. King that there are always pacifists who might need to accept war in order to prevent more war, citing the example of Neville Chamberlain and the escalation of violence in World War II.

Huntley Thomas Writes MLK About His New Production

Thomas Huntley tells Dr. King that he is the first in Atlanta to get a copy of his new production and asks for Dr. Kings opinion.

Check Distribution for the Crusade for Citizenship Program

Friday, December 31, 1965

Mildred Smith is given a check on behalf of the Crusade for Citizenship program.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Letter from MLK to Esther Thompson

Monday, November 29, 1965

Dr. King informs Mrs. Thompson that the SCLC does not have the resources to help aid her husband's sight. Dr. King recommends that she contact churches in her area for help.

Convocation on Equal Justice Under the Law

Thursday, May 28, 1964

This is a transcript of remarks made by Dr. King at the Convocation on Equal Justice Under Law, sponsored by the NAACP Legal Defense Fund on May 28, 1964.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, November 8, 1967

Friday, November 8, 1968

In this correspondence to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, Miss. Dora McDonald - Dr. King's secretary, informed him that his letter came during his Dr. King's absence, but she had an opportunity to communicate with him. She expressed that Dr. King's calendar would not allow him to meet with Mr. Gilliam, for an interview, but suggested that he send in one or two questions for Dr. King to answer and send back.

Telegram from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

Joan Daves inquires if Dr. King can attend the January Herald Tribune Book and Author Luncheon.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

This pamphlet outlines the mission and objectives of SCLC's Citizenship Education Program. The program was designed to inform citizens about how to become full citizens in America. SCLC also addresses the recruitment of potential teachers to assist with the curriculum.

Letter from MLK to Norman Baugher

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dr. King conveys his support to Norman Baugher for the Church of the Brethren's past correspondence regarding publicizing the philosophy of nonviolence.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Irvin G. Perkins

Thursday, June 16, 1966

Dr. King informs Rev. Perkins that he will not be available to preach at Donlands United Church in Toronto. Dr. King also writes that Mrs. King thoroughly enjoyed her visit to Toronto.