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Draft of MLK's An Open Letter to Negro Youth

Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL

In an open letter to Negro Youths, Dr. King urges them to stay committed to the nonviolent principles of social change in their plight to gain broad access to education and employment.

Letter from Carey Preston to Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 9, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. Carey B. Preston confirms the details of Dr. King's trip to Philadelphia to speak at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Convention.

Letter from MLK to a Donor

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King expresses gratitude for a contribution received by The Montgomery Improvement Association.

Itinerary for MLK

Pennsylvania (PA), Maine (ME), Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), New York, NY, Connecticut (CT), Massachusetts (MA)

In this correspondence, a list of "appearances" for Dr. King is listed.

Card from Joyce Anderson to MLK

Saturday, September 27, 1958
New York (NY)

Joyce Anderson sends Dr. King a "get well" card with a note of encouragement after he was stabbed by a woman in Harlem, New York.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Thursday, June 30, 1966
New York (NY)

This royalty statement from Harper and Row, Publishers Incorporated, details royalty earnings for Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" for the six month period ending June 30, 1966.

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK

Thursday, November 17, 1966
Chicago, IL, California (CA), VIETNAM

Mr. Sandperl writes to Dr. King regarding the direction of the SCLC. He suggest that the SCLC continue to represent social change and uphold the principles of nonviolence. However, in order to succeed, Mr. Sandperl believes that it should be done from a universal view, instead of from a Negro perspective.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Agenda

Friday, August 16, 1963
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

This document is a strategic outline for the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Evil

Dr. King quotes Harris Franklin Rall's "Christianity," highlighting the topic "the evil of the universe."

Letter from Christa Beer to MLK

Monday, October 25, 1965
GERMANY

Christa Beer, a student at the English Institute of Frederick-Schiller University of Jena in East Germany, informs Dr. King that she is writing her final paper on his works in civil rights. She explains the lack of resources at her university and asks that he send her information to aid her in her research.

Letter from Alice Murphy to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Alice Murphy informs Dr. King that she is considering writing a segment about the current situation in Alabama. It is necessary that she speak directly with him, as she does not want to say anything "without some degree of personal knowledge."

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Los Angeles, CA

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Telegram from Roland Wolf

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Atlanta, GA

In this Western Union telegram, Roland Wolf requests Dr. King's appearance on a "conversation show" with one or two writers, allowing an opportunity to learn his views on existing issues.

Letter from Viva O. Sloam to CORE Members

Tuesday, June 19, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Kentucky (KY), Michigan (MI), West Virginia (WV)

Viva O. Sloam, sends a letter to members of the Congress for Racial Equality regarding integration in a Kentucky neighborhood.

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, London, England, PAKISTAN, INDIA, CONGO / ZAIRE

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ralph Kates

Wednesday, October 4, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Dora McDonald writes Ralph Kates on behalf of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit St. Joseph College.

Letter from Albert Duff, Jr. to MLK

Kentucky (KY), Cincinnati, OH, Chicago, IL, ITALY

A former critic of Dr. King pledges allegiance to him after his bold and noble stance against the Vietnam War. Albert Duff, Jr. finally understands that color lines should not be a symbol of divisiveness. Duff feels that the world needs men of Dr. King's courage to speak from the Bible.

The False God of Science

Sunday, July 5, 1953

In this manuscript the author addresses their belief on the validity of modern man making a god of science.

Program - Thompson Memorial Chapel-Williams College

Sunday, April 16, 1961

This document is a Sunday service program from Thompson Memorial Chapel at Williams College. Dr. King is noted as a guest preacher.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to MLK

Wednesday, March 13, 1968
Minnesota (MN)

Calling himself "a pale face Christian," Charles E. Waring writes Dr. King to acknowledge that all Christians must aid African Americans in their fight for fair representation and respect as equal human beings. He denounces whites who condemn Dr. King and asks, "what can we white Christians do to help recover the leadership of the Negro cause to worthy men?"

Sin

Dr. King cites a quote from Reinhold Niebuhr regarding sin.

Telegram from MLK to Governor Albertis Harrison

Virginia (VA), Richmond, VA

Dr. King requests an investigation into acts of police brutality committed in Petersburg, Virginia during a demonstration.

Myths and Facts About OEO

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

This document lists myths and facts regarding the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Letter from MLK to Dr. James C. Gray

Monday, November 18, 1963
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL

Dr. King thanks Dr. James Gray for his generous contribution to the SCLC and states, "Without your dollars for freedom, the Conference would be unable to work effectively."

Letter to Twelve Southern Governors

Dr. King addresses twelve southern governors regarding the urgency of a unification between the Negro community and government leaders. Dr. King requests a meeting between the governors and himself to address and resolve their issues concerning race relations.

Letter from Mildred Hood to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mildred Hood explains to Dr. King what she and her daughter experienced at the Cook County Hospital in Chicago. Hood wants to know what she can do about the situation.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter from Joan Daves, Dr. King is informed that a check for $24.96 is enclosed. The check represents the permission fee for the use of an extract from "Stride Toward Freedom" by Macmillan Company.

Dorothy Cotton's Notes

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), DENMARK

Dorothy Cotton's compilation of notes includes topics such as the advantages of urbanization, diversity, automation, the "purpose of human effort," Denmark, community mobilization, the democratic method, the behavior of a responsible citizen and the "greatest prize" for mankind. Dorothy Cotton was the SCLC's Education Director and one of the organization's highest ranking female members at the time.

Request for Land Reform Bill

An anonymous writer asks Dr. King to petition Congress for a reform bill that would allow all people, irrespective of race, creed or societal status, to own land.

Letter to Mrs. King from Jose Nieto

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.