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SCLC Annual Meeting

Nashville, TN

This program outlines the schedule of events for SCLC's 1961 annual meeting.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Dreifuss to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967
Chicago, IL

Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Dreifuss inform Dr. King that his recent broadcast on Face the Nation has reinvigorated their faith in the movement.

Lace Laird Affirms his Support for MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968
Detroit, MI

Lace Laird wrote to Dr. King acknowledging that he stood with Dr. King at multiple marches in Detroit. He further rendered his services to Dr. King for SCLC's 1968 Poor Peoples March on Washington.

We Salute You!

Atlanta, GA

Thirteen members of Ebenezer Baptist Church are praised for their years of service and role in making the church monumental.

Letter from Swedish Student Katarina Andersson to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965
SWEDEN

Katarina Andersson, a young Swedish girl, thanks Dr. King for the inspiration his book "Why We Can't Wait" has provided her. She expresses her keen interest in the American civil rights movement and her hope to study in the United States in the future.

Unity

These notes, prepared by Dr. King, were for a sermon entitled "Unity." This sermon, believed to be composed during the time of 1948-1954, was never delivered.

Letter from E. M. Blaz to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Blaz writes Dr. King to inform him about the formation of the Negro organization Chicago Central Service Bureau. This organization is an enterprise that includes a variety of programs that offer education towards consumer loans, mortgage loans, travel agencies, insurance, etc.

Address by Jackie Robinson at SCLC Freedom Dinner

Tuesday, September 25, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), ITALY, CANADA

Guest speaker Jackie Robinson discusses his personal struggles with adopting the philosophy of nonviolence, race relations and the far-reaching efforts of the SCLC.

Letter from Robert L. Martin to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964
Texas (TX), Dallas, TX, Atlanta, GA

Dr. Robert L. Martin, Associate Professor of History at Texas Christian University, invites Dr. King to come speak to the university.

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.

Aid Victims of South Africa's Racism

Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Members of the American Committee on Africa solicit funding for the support and advancement of victims of Apartheid in South Africa. This brochure highlights the unjust treatment of black South Africans through individual testimonies.

Letter from Julius H. Avery to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

Julius H. Avery notifies Dr. King that he will be in Atlanta for a conference at the Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. Mr. Avery further requests that during his visit to the city, he and Dr. King arrange a meeting.

How My Mind Has Changed In the Last Decade

Dr. King discusses how his thoughts about theological theory have changed over the years. It is the only page of the document in the collection.

Letter From S. I. Hayakawa to MLK

Friday, July 26, 1963
Georgia (GA), California (CA)

S.I. Hayakawa inquires about a previous contribution to the SCLC and asks if it is tax deductible.

Letter from Beatrice Rossell to MLK

Saturday, July 4, 1964
Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA

Beatrice Rossell wrote this letter to Dr. King on Independence Day in 1964, commending him on the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and enclosing a donation. She ends her note, saying "God bless you, your fine family, and the future of your great work."

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to Homer A. Jack

Thursday, September 2, 1965
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Ralph Abernathy submits a check on behalf of the SCLC to Homer Jack of the Unitarian Universalist Association to be donated to the Jimmie Lee Jackson Memorial Fund. The money will be used to purchase a new home for Jackson's parents and to finance the education for Jackson's sister. Jimmie Lee Jackson was murdered by a Alabama State Trooper while trying to protect his mother and grandfather from a beating during a march melee in Marion, Alabama. Jackson's death initiated the push for a march from Selma to Montgomery.

"Where Do We Go From Here?" Asks Negro King

Thursday, February 1, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

In this article, Palmer Van Gundy reviews Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." He calls the book a must for all Americans, naming Dr. King not just the greatest civil rights leaders, but also a "leader for peace with freedom and justice."

Letter from Richard Sand to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM

In this letter, Mr. Richard Sand, of the New York Vietnam Summer, requested that Dr. King forward autographed photographs to the New York office.

Notes about Books

Dr. King opposes the existence of books that degrade the Negro image and falsely contribute to a "national brainwashing." He cites quotations from novelist John Steinbeck, which discourse on the "sacred" nature of a book.

Monotheism

Dr. King describes monotheism, the belief in the existence of one God, as it compares to Hebrews and Greeks in a civilized world. He quotes Albert C. Knudson from "Religious Teachings of the Old Testament."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eliot Stadler

Monday, June 22, 1964
St. Augustine, FL, Alabama (AL), Minnesota (MN)

Dora McDonald communicates the traveling details to Eliot Stadler regarding his temporary staff placement in the SCLC.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Mr. Virginia M. Burke

Tuesday, May 10, 1966
Milwaukee, WI

Miss McDonald writes to Mr. Burke of the University of Wisconsin granting permission to quote Dr. King's historical "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter to Dr. Neil V. Sullivan from Robert L. Green

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Michigan (MI), Berkeley, CA

Robert Green expresses his appreciation for Dr. Neil Sullivan's chapter contribution in the book, "Education and the Urban Poor." Mr. Green is pleased when he discovers Dr. Sullivan has contributed a portion of the book profits to Dr. King and the SCLC. The book will be in demand for college level courses focusing on education, psychology and sociology.

Letter from Valentina Borremans to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Valentina Borremans, Director of CIDOC, invites Dr. King to their upcoming summer seminar that will be attended by North American and Latin American intellectuals and leaders concerned with social change.

A Resolution for Dr. King from the Church Women United in Atlanta

Atlanta, GA

This is a resolution honoring Dr. King's life and work upon his untimely death.

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

VIETNAM, Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Advertisement for Why We Can't Wait

This advertisement for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," appeared in the Christian Herald in June of 1964.

Letter from Harry Denman to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Nashville, TN

Mr.Denman writes Dr. King to share words of support and encouragement as Dr. King prepares to turn himself over to the Birmingham officials. Denman suggests that Dr.King should turn this event into a major demonstration.

Letter from Anton Marguleas to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966
San Francisco, CA

Anton Marguleas, of the Paramount Export Company, writes Dr. King to express his views on democracy and human rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eartha Kitt

Wednesday, January 24, 1968
Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald commends actress Eartha Kitt for speaking "as a woman, among women.” Responding to a question by the First Lady at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, Kitt linked youth violence to the Vietnam War.