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Letter From DuPree Jordan to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

DuPree Jordan, of the Office of Economic Opportunity, hopes to meet with Dr. King and hear his suggestions and ideas to improve any of the OEO's programs.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Moreland Griffith Smith

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Andrew Young informs Moreland Griffith Smith Sr. that he will be unable to attend a meeting in Montgomery, Alabama. Reverend James Bevel will attend the meeting instead.

God, Knowledge Of (Wieman)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "How Do We Know God?" from the Journal of Religion.

A Look to 1964

This is a draft of the article "A Look to 1964" written by Dr. King. Published on January 1, 1964 in the New York Amsterdam News. In the article, Dr. King addresses the strides the African American people have taken towards the struggle for equality.

Anonymous Card and Article to MLK

An anonymous sender encloses an article written about Dr. King and his anti-Vietnam War sentiments.

Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

Monday, August 22, 1966

Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.

Letter from James Marley to MLK

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

James Marley, Secretary and Treasurer of the Hotel and Club Employees Union Local 6, encloses a contribution to the SCLC "to aid [with] the great task to obtain equality for all Americans."

Letter Regarding MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

This letter from Dad to Frank and Mark commends Dr. Kings use of the 'march' as means to secure a better life for the Negro. The author goes on to say the integration benefits both the Negro and whites in the supply and demand of labor.

Letter from Thomas Hejzlar to MLK

Friday, December 1, 1967

Student Thomas Hejzlar of Czechoslovakia writes to Dr. King requesting an autograph. He includes a postcard for Dr. King to sign and return.

Letter from MLK to Joel Crittenden

Dr. King responds to Joel Crittenden's concern about white hatred toward Negroes by making two points: 1) some whites have given their lives in the freedom struggle, and 2) hatred and violence must be met with love and nonviolence.

The Wind of Change is Blowing

Wednesday, June 27, 1962

Dr. King addresses the positive changes that have taken place across the world and how they should continue to occur until equality is reached.

Letter from Mary E. Bull to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Mary Bull asks Dr. King to reply to an earlier letter, of which she encloses a copy. Mrs. Bull asserts that the Civil Rights Movement made excellent progress up to 1966, but afterwards seemed divided. She wants to know the reasons for this division and asks Dr. King to bring back the supporters who have strayed.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Payments from England

Wednesday, December 2, 1964

Literary agent Joan Daves provides Dr. King with detailed figures of royalties from an anthology containing his work and the British edition of "Stride Toward Freedom."

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Christianity

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Martin Luther's views on Christianity, accroding to the book, "Concerning Christian Liberty."

An Invitation to the Honoring of Rabbi Israel Dresner and Reverend Richard Wilson

This document serves as an invitation to a event honoring Rabbi Dresner and Rev. Wilson for their outstanding spiritual leadership.

The U.S. Negro, 1953

Monday, May 11, 1953

This Time Magazine article discusses socioeconomic components for the Negro in 1953. Topics range from the Mason-Dixon Line and Cadillacs, to the difference between Southern and Northern Negroes.

Hell-for the Liberal

Dr. King quotes a definition regarding hell. The definition states that hell is a consequence not a punishment. The notecard ends with a statement about youth's perspective of the world.

Man (His Split Personality)

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

SCLC's People to People Tour

The SCLC held their Alabama "People to People Tour" from December 5-8, 1962. This itinerary lists the SCLC staff that participated in addition to the locations of their meetings.

Letter from George T. Raymond to MLK

Monday, February 4, 1963

George Raymond, Rebecca Taylor and Rosa Ballard follow up with Dr. King about his availability to speak to the NAACP in Chester, Pennsylvania.

Royalty Statement for Casterman Published Edition of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement references royalties earned for a French-language edition of "Strength to Love".

Schleiermacher (Religion as Contemplation)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Ethics

Dr. King records some notes on ethics and the book of Micah.

Darien Seeking Negro Teachers

Thursday, November 26, 1964

This article discusses the teacher exchange program between New York City Public Schools and Darien, Connecticut. The program calls for African American teachers to teach students in the predominately white town. The superintendent states the purpose of the project is to show the students that African Americans, if given the same opportunity, are just as intelligent as their white counterparts.

Letter from J. Percy to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

J. Percy sends Dr. King an unpleasant note asserting that he is always complaining. Percy also wishes that Dr. King would stop talking about slums.

Injunction Requested by the City of Birmingham against Protests

The City of Birmingham submitted this "bill of injunction" to the Circuit Court of Alabama to try to stop the sit ins, boycott pickets, and marches led by Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC, and others in April of 1963. After the injunction was granted and served April 10th, they continued their civil disobedience and many more were arrested. From solitary confinement, Dr. King then wrote "Letter from a Birmingham Jail."

Letter from High School Student Jeanne Adams to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Joanne Adams, a student from Central High School, writes Dr. King to voice her support for what he is doing for negro citizens in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Bo Wirmark to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Bo Wirmark writes Dr. King to clarify the misconception behind Vilgot Sjoman's film "I Am Curious (Yellow)," and explain how his interview is being used in the film. Wirmark also extends an invitation for Dr. King to visit Uppsala, Sweden.

Statement Condemning Judge Elliot's Restraining Order

Sunday, July 22, 1962

Dr. King and Dr. William G. Anderson, President of the Albany Movement, denounce US District Judge J. Robert Elliott's temporary restraining order that prevents them from staging protests. They add that, out of respect for the federal judiciary, they will abide by the order and appeal to a higher level. They assume the order applies only to the named defendants and colleagues and not to the entire community and will not discourage others from taking action. Judge Elliott’s injunction was later overturned by the Fifth Circuit US Court of Appeals.