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"Tennessee (TN)"

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.

Letter from Roger Dunloff, Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 5, 1962

Due to his inability to contribute financially, Roger G. Dunloff offers his prayers and moral support to Dr. King and the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Saul S. Sherman

Monday, January 3, 1966

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Mrs. Saul S. Sherman for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He writes how monumental the change for Negroes in the South has been in the last ten years and how revolutionary the future will be thanks to her generous donation.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Dr. Oswald Spengler regarding his ideology of immortality. According to Spengler, history holds no permanent value. King states "If such a philosophy of history is right there would be no reason to desire continued existence...immortality would have no meaning."

Letter from Ellen Bandler to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 11, 1962

Ellen Bandler writes Miss McDonald about a letter that was received on September 10, 1962 concerning the publication of Mr. Killens' book being postponed until January 1963.

Memorandum Regarding California Fund Raising Meeting for SCLC

Monday, March 7, 1960

Dr. King addresses Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy informing him of the transportation cost and hotel expenses for his trip to California.

Letter from Phyllis Kaplan to Readers

Academic Media sends out a questionnaire to gather important data regarding financial aid programs.

Letter from West Virginia NAACP to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1962

William M. Grayson informs Dr. King that he is seeking information regarding his availability to attend a speaking engagement.

Letter from MLK to C. Anderson Davis

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King replies to Reverend Davis' invitation to speak at the West Virginia Emancipation Proclamation Committee event in Bluefield, West Virginia. Dr. King declines the invitation citing his he has already accepted the maximum number of speaking engagements for the next ten to twelve months. Dr. King does extend his appreciation for the Committee's moral and financial support of the work done by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Dora McDonald to L. N. W. Christian

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dora McDonald writes Mr. Christian on Dr. King's behalf. She acknowledges his disagreement with Dr. King's philosophy and refers him to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for answers to his questions.

Letter from MLK to Senator Hiram L. Fong

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Hawaii Republican Senator Hiram Fong for his role in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Fong was the first Asian American and Chinese American to become a US Senator.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Thursday, June 30, 1966

This royalty statement from Harper and Row, Publishers Incorporated, details royalty earnings for Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" for the six month period ending June 30, 1966.

What Shall We Do to Be Saved

This is an outline for a sermon given by Dr. King, entitled, "What Shall We Do To Be Saved?" It includes an intended introduction. The date and location for which this sermon was delivered is unknown.

Statement to Be Used If There is a Victory for Reagan

SCLC prepares a contingency statement, with Dr. King's handwritten edits. The statement asserts that some elections' newly overt racism reflects the prejudice and bigotry in America. The statement calls on Negroes to collaborate with honest white allies to gain legal and moral rights.

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Chicago Staff

Wednesday, January 10, 1968

Tom Offenburger writes to the SCLC Chicago Office Staff Steering Committee concerning phone call procedures. Offenburger asserts that answering the phone with "Operation Breadbasket" will not reveal the broader interest of the SCLC, and suggests answering the phone with, "good morning, SCLC."

Letter from Lawrence J. Rozman to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

Lawrence J. Rozman, who identifies himself as a white Catholic, is in admiration of Dr. King's avenue of execution to the racial issues in the United States. In addition, Mr. Rozman requests to become a member of the SCLC.

Invitation from the United Nations to Mr. and Mrs. Popper

The United Nations Representatives for the United States of America and Norway invite Mr. and Mrs. Popper to attend an event in honor of Dr. King.

Letter from Joan Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964

Joan Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his support.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Chilean Citizens

Dr. King thanks Rodolfo Molina and Arturo Venegas for their contribution and support to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Courtland Cox to MLK

Wednesday, September 23, 1964

Courtland Cox of SNCC writes Dr. King reminding him that several of their members are away in Africa and informs him that Mr. Lewis will not be able to attend his convention.

Letter From Mitchell Sviridoff to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Mitchell Sviridoff responds to a telegram from Dr. King, in which Dr. King states his support of the Queens Clinical Society's proposal for a neighborhood health service center.

National Sharecroppers Fund Annual Report

Frank P. Graham, chairman of the National Sharecropper's Fund, mails out two separate articles from The New York Times and The New York Post that referencing the organization which supports migrant farm workers. Graham provides factual information pertaining to the proposed legislation to improve living standards for farm workers, and communicates the need for such a proposal.

Toynbee

Dr. King highlights a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's twelve-volume analysis of the rise and fall of civilizations, "A Study of History."

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey informs Dr. King of scheduling complications that will delay his response to Dr. King's request to address the SCLC.

Letter from Robert R. Janks to MLK

Monday, October 14, 1963

Robert R. Janks writes Dr. King admiring his leadership during the fight for equality. Janks also recommends two additional quotes that Dr. King should use in his future speeches.

Religion and Peace of Soul

Dr. King cites a quotation from Jesus Christ that discusses peace, the "chief legacy" of religion. Dr. King explains that inner peace is maintained regardless of the external adversity one endures in life. Dr. King continues to elaborate on the necessary functional relationship one must have with God. He further describes the association between good, evil, innocence and more.

Letter to MLK from Robert McAfee Brown to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968

Mr. McAfee requests that Dr. King issues a statement, and host a service in his Church, supporting Bill Coffin.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Stanley Terry

Wednesday, October 10, 1962

Dr. King extends his appreciation to Reverend Terry of New York for his witness in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Lawrence Friedman to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

The former president of the Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation, Lawrence J. Friedman, writes Dr. King to inform him of a letter concerning the Kennedy assassination, which was written on an unauthorized piece of stationery. The letter is dated January 29, 1968, but The Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation was dissovled under the laws of the State of California on May 16, 1966. The letter was signed by Donald Freed. Lawrence P. Friedman wishes to make it clear that he had no knowledge of the letter being sent.

Philosophy of Religion

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's definition of the philosophy of religion. Brightman argues that the rational interpretation and comparison of religion is the basis for the philosophy of religion.