Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Tennessee (TN)"

Letter from Tim Bowden to MLK

Tuesday, January 16, 1968

Tim Bowden requests an interview with Dr. King for the Australian Broadcasting Commission.

The Desegregated Heart

Sunday, July 1, 1962

Dr. King praises Sarah-Patton Boyle for her creation of the book, "The Desegregated Heart." Dr. King recommends that everyone reads the book, for it expresses the power of Christian love operating in the human heart.

Letter From William S. Minor to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965

William S. Minor writes Dr. King thanking him for responding to a personal invite regarding research on racial revolution.

Letter to Rev. Thomas Thrasher from MLK and Others

Friday, January 11, 1957

Dr. King and other civil rights leaders contact the President of the Montgomery Ministerial Association, Rev. Thomas Thrasher, to compliment him on his statement subsequent to the bombings in Alabama.

MLK Notes on Ministers Arrest

Dr. King, protested the arrest of three ministers who were advocating for desegregation. He warned that individuals that did not take a stand against oppression will help push the South into 'fascism.'

Letter from MLK to F. A. Bussey

Friday, March 23, 1962

Dr. King informs the National Morehouse College Alumni President that he will be unable to meet with a group of Morehouse men following his address at Howard University. His schedule is too hectic even though he would enjoy the "hours of fellowship."

Immortality

Dr. King writes a quote from Goethe from Johann Peter Eckermann's "Conversations of Goethe."

Brightman's Idea of God

Dr. King references philosopher and theologian Edgar Brightman's idea of God. According to Brightman, God is finite and "powerful enough to lead the work toward higher and higher levels."

Report from Morehouse College President to the Board of Trustees

Thursday, November 9, 1967

In this report Hugh M. Gloster, the new President of Morehouse College presents his report to the Board of Trustees for the 1967-68 academic school year. In this report he addresses daily activities of the college, student body, new programs, enrollment, college faculty, grants and incentives received by Morehouse. He also addresses the goal for the college to raise 11 million by the year 1970 for its endowment.

Letter from Robert T. Handy to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Robert Handy of the Union Theological Seminary invites Dr. King to be the "major evening speaker" for their Conference on Race and Religion.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Roselyn Silverman

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Roselyn Silverman of Dr. King's availability to speak at the University of Toledo in Ohio. She also informs Miss Silverman that Dr. King will be out of the country writing a book, so further inquiries regarding "new invitations" will be made upon his return.

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.

Letter from Roy M. Green to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Green wants Dr. King to read and give an opinion on the three views of the "Black Ghetto" in the October issue of the Atlantic Monthly. Mr. Green states to Dr. King, "Our editors would be most interested in your opinions and comments".

Telegram from Senator Percy to MLK

Saturday, June 3, 1967

Senator Charles H. Percy invites Dr. King to a private dinner to discuss innovative approaches for private sector involvement in the "urban problem."

Letter from John Mack to MLK Requesting Advice

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

In this letter, John Mack asks Dr. King for advice on selecting the proper employment position that would satisfy his desire to contribute to "the perpetuation of social change and Negro progress," while still providing economic security for him and his family.

Old Testament History Notes

Dr. King records notes from the Old Testament of the Bible. Much of the focus is on Isaiah and the downfall of Jerusalem.

Attitude, Knowledge and Apperception of the Civil Rights in the Puerto Rican Public

E. Seda Bonilla, Ph. D. writes about the acts of discrimination that occur in Puerto Rico. Backed by data, it is said that colored groups are being kept from achieving higher levels of education. In addition, Bonilla observes a correlation between individual occupational rate and individual degree of intolerance.

Unwise and Untimely?

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

Royalty Statement for Where Do We Go From Here

Friday, August 4, 1967

Dr. King is receiving a check in the amount of $1048.50 in advance for the German Language edition of Where Do We Go From Here.

Letter from MLK to Pasteur Jacques Martin

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Jacques Martin for his recent visit to Lyons, France. Dr. King also wishes to send greetings to some other associates there.

Invitation from Edwin H. Tuller to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964

Edwin Tuller requests Dr. King show special attention to the invitation from the European Baptist Federation. Mr. Tuller is certain that Dr. King's presence in Europe at this time would be "extremely beneficial" with the progression of "racial brotherhood."

We're Ready to Guzzle It, But We Ain't Ready to Make It!

George S. Schuyler uses his weekly "Views and Reviews" column to voice his opinions about the lack of economic initiative in the Negro community.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alan J. Rankin

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Alan Rankin on behalf of Dr. King regarding a possible visit to McMaster University.

Invitation to President Johnson's Inauguration

Dr. King receives an invitation to attend and participate in the Inauguration of President Lyndon B. Johnson and Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey.

Letter from MLK to Spilman

Thursday, July 30, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Spilman for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. He acknowledges how such funds have been allocated to combat the civil injustices faced by Negroes in America. He concludes by addressing the future social and political agendas of the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Phale D. Hale

Wednesday, October 9, 1963

Dr. King congratulates Rev. Hale on Union Grove Baptist Church's 75th Anniversary.

The Modern Negro Activist

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

Methodology, Tests of Truth

Dr. King discusses Henry Nelson Wieman's test of truth in religion described in "The Source of Human Good."

Letter from Charles Johnson to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Charles Johnson offers suggestions to Dr. King about job creation following the violent riots that took place in the summer of 1967. He proposes that the federal government intervene and allow younger potential workers to enter into the job force and retire those who have been employed a long time. According to Johnson, employing these young workers will eliminate the uprisings seen in various urban cities around the United States.

"Outrage in Alabama"

Sunday, May 5, 1963

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference reprinted the article, "Outrage in Alabama," which was originally printed in The New York Times. The article describes violent acts against civil rights demonstrators discussing the flaws within the legal system.