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"Tennessee (TN)"

Letter from MLK to Pastor Charles Westphal

Monday, November 8, 1965

Dr. King shares his contentment with the company of Pastor Charles Westphal and the rest of the French Protestant Federation.

Letter from MLK to Emily Barton Anable

Tuesday, February 19, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Anable for her kind letter and financial gift. Mrs. King asked him to let her know the money will be used to purchase something for the new baby. At the time of the letter's writing, Dr. and Mrs. King were expecting their fourth child, Bernce.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King references theological literature regarding the development of Christianity.

MLK Address at the Georgia State Capitol Regarding Julian Bond

Friday, January 14, 1966

Dr. King delivers this speech at the State Capitol of Georgia protesting the legislation refusal to seat black politician Julian Bond. King calls this a "grave injustice" particularly since the state legislature of Georgia considers itself protecting the United States Constitution. Dr. King points out the irony of this act and exposes other irresponsible actions of the legislature.

Letter from MLK to Frank Church

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Frank Church, a United States Senator from Idaho, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Comte (A Criticism by Dr. R. flint)

Dr. King quotes a statement from Robert Flint's "Philosophy of History in France and Germany" which criticizes French philosopher, August Comte. Robert Flint was a Scottish philosopher.

Exodus

Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Biblical book of Exodus. Highlighted topics include knowledge, ethics, the doctrine of God, and sin.

Letter from Hosea Williams to Project Leaders and Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

Hosea Williams, Director of National Mobilization for the Washington Poor People's Campaign, informs each project leader of their immediate supervisors of mobilization.

Letter from MLK to Dwight Campbelll

Friday, September 11, 1964

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Methodist Youth Fellowship to speak in Philadelphia.

Letter to MLK from Eugene Exman of Harper & Brothers, Feb. 15, 1962

Thursday, February 15, 1962

Eugene Exman, of Harper & Brothers, addressed this letter to Dr. King informing him that his first book, "STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM" was chosen as one of 500 books in President Kennedy's collection at the White House. The decision, regarding Dr. King's book was made by the American Booksellers Association. Mr. Exman, lastly, inquired about Dr. King's progress on a manuscript for his second book.

Letter from Robert W. Fischer to MLK

Monday, January 27, 1964

Robert Fischer is a collector of autographed TIME magazine covers that feature famous personalities. He requests the cover with Dr. King's portrait, so that he may add it to his growing collection.

Letter about Publication with Reprint of MLK's Remarks

Thursday, December 28, 1967

In this letter, Paul Kurtz, the editor of the Humanist, asks Dr. King to look over and comment on the enclosed copy of his piece that will be printed in Humanist.

Letter from Maurice N. Eisendrath to Dr. Bernard Lee

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Maurice N. Eisendrath request Dr. Bernard Lee to provide a list of the contributors from Dr. King's address to the Union of American Hebrew Congregations. The list is to facilitate Mr. Eisendrath in contacting other contributors to raise additional funds for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter to MLK from Rev. A.D. King

Monday, April 2, 1962

Dr. King's brother, Rev. A.D. Williams King, wrote this letter to Dr. King, thanking him for his participation, at the First Baptist Church Installation Services in Birmingham.

Letter from Great St. Mary's

Monday, January 18, 1965

Hugh Montefiore informs Dr. King that he is awaiting a response to an earlier letter. Montefiore had hoped that Dr. King could preach in an effort to "fix up" some local ministers.

Letter from Clayton Yates to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Clayton R. Yates informs Dr. King of the Kappa Boule Meeting held on Morehouse College campus with James P. Brawley and Benjamin E. Mays.

Letter to MLK from Paul Anderson

Paul Anderson expressed concern about what he perceived as Dr. King's move toward the "new left." With a sense of immediacy he urged Dr. King to plan to meet with Robert Pickus on his next visit to northern California. Anderson posited that Pickus' plan concerning the Vietnam War is more worthy to be aligned with the non-violent tradition, "unlike the movement toward which Dr. King is leaning."

Letter from Ms. Gitta Gossmann to Ms. Dora McDonald

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Ms. Gossmann writes to Ms. McDonald regarding Dr. King's "Strength to Love." Enclosed in the letter are contract copies for the Italian-language edition of the publication.

The Transcendental Dialectics

Dr. King writes on the "soul" and the "world" as two ideas of reason. He speaks to the human tendency to apply the categories of quantity, quality, relation, and modality to our understanding of the self. King ends these notes by contemplating "two absolutely contradictory propositions [that] seem to be established by the refutation of the other."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Article Fee

Thursday, November 19, 1964

Ms. Daves encloses Dr. King's fee for his article in the "Saturday Evening Post" and discusses issues concerning future reprints of this particular work.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

Letter from Robert J. Beaubien to MLK

Friday, December 18, 1964

Robert Beaubien congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Letter from Emmitt LaMarr to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967

Emmitt LaMarr writes Dr. King about the status of his proposal to the National Dairy Products Corporation regarding Operation Breadbasket. Although LaMarr does not hold an executive position with the corporation, he assures Dr. King his efforts are not in vain.

Letter From Joseph Livingston to MLK Regarding Receipt of Letter

Saturday, December 2, 1967

Here Joseph Livingston beckons Dr. King to confirm receipt of a letter sent in reference to what he describes as "a matter of Life and Death".

Letter from Oral Roberts to MLK

In this letter, noted evangelist Oral Roberts thanks "my dear partner" for making possible a trip to Vietnam and encloses a special report on the mission. Roberts conducted more than 300 crusades on six continents during his ministry.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson, a civil rights activist and politician, invites Dr. King to speak at a concert that will benefit the children of Medgar Evers and the families of the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Culbertson explains that the program will feature performances from different choirs. He also mentions that if Dr. King is unable to attend, he would appreciate Dr. King's help securing another prominent speaker.

Letter from Mark Staib to MLK

Mark Staib, a debater at John Carroll University, requests that Dr. King sends information on the debate topic: "Resolved: that the federal government should guarantee a minimum annual cash income for every citizen."

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.