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Western Union Telegram Sent to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. from Richard Charles Boone 1965

Friday, November 5, 1965

Richard Charles Boone sent Dr. King this 1965 telegram informing him of possible racial hostility in Miami between the black community and Cuban immigrants moving into the city.

September 1964, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s secretary writes Joan Daves to inform her of his absence.

Friday, September 11, 1964

Dora McDonald, secretary to Dr. King, wrote Joan Daves to inform her that Dr. King will look into the request from Philip Unwin upon his return from Berlin.

Letter from Gordon Allott to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Gordon Alliot, a member of the United States Senate, sends his appreciation to Dr. King for his endorsement for a position on the "historic civil rights bill."

Letter to MLK from Moynihan about Invitation to Conference

Monday, March 27, 1967

A formal letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of MIT and Harvard University invites Dr. King to a Conference on Social Statistics and the City at Executive House in Washington, DC, June 22 and 23, 1967. Signed by Director Daniel P. Moynihan, the correspondence cites the inadequacy of the 1960 US census in enumerating the Negro, Puerto Rican, and Mexican populations, a concern about the impact on voting rights, and the need for better enumeration in the 1970 census.

Messages From Dora McDonald to Dr. King

Notes from Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, detailing phone messages from key movement stakeholders and colleagues.

Letter from Chuck Sumner Stone Jr. to MLK

Monday, May 28, 1962

Chuck Stone, Editor of the Washington Afro-American, instructs Dr. King to review their publication regarding the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He wishes Dr. King luck in his endeavors and prays for many more men of his stature.

Letter from Stanley Lavison to MLK Regarding Speeches

Thursday, March 17, 1966

In this letter to Dr. King, Stanley D. Levison references text books with Dr. King's speeches and The Chicago Rally.

Letter from Letitia Baldrige to MLK

Tuesday, February 5, 1963

Letitia Baldridge, Social Secretary for the White House, informs Dr. and Mrs. King of changes related to a reception with President Kennedy.

Fight for Open City

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Included in The United Council Sentinel, is an excerpt featuring an initiative of Dr. King and various others: Operation Breadbasket. The author explores the details of this specific movement.

Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

In this letter to Dr. King, Norman Thomas, a pacifist and political activist, writes to ensure that he attend a small civil rights conference in Washington, D.C.

Letter to Dr. King from Mrs. Beckler

Mrs. Beckler encloses five dollars in a support letter to Dr. King, wishing the best for his health and asking for an autographed copy of one of his books.

Letter from Ervin R. Meyer to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Ervin R. Meyer informs Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy that he is against the Poor People's March on Washington. Mr. Meyers perceives these demonstrations as attracting "law breakers" that do not reflect Christian actions. The author identifies additional organizations and expresses their opposition to the SCLC's Christian mission.

Letter from Women's Society of Tremont Baptist Church to MLK

Wednesday, May 26, 1965

The Women's Society of Tremont Baptist Church informs Dr. King that the money raised during their Women's Day will be forwarded to assist with his work in the South.

Letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to MLK

Friday, March 10, 1967

This is a letter from Debby Swichkow and Michael Goldberg to Dr. King inviting him to be the keynote speaker at a Jewish Seminar on Negro-Jewish relationships.

Dexter Echo: March 2, 1960

Wednesday, March 2, 1960

This edition of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church newsletter, The Dexter Echo, reports information about upcoming events and the latest news, including a recent gift made to Dr. King and his family. A key article speaks to the power and necessity of worship.

Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Program

This document details a budget for the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee's Project Administration component.

Telegram from Tina McDonald to MLK

Tina McDonald wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and is pleased to send God's blessings of courage and strength.

Fundraising Letter from MLK Addressed to Friends

Dr. King writes this letter on behalf of the Workers Defense League, requesting funds to assist six South African youth who seek political protection in the U.S.

Letter from Florida Congressman Dante B. Fascell to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Representative Fascell informs Dr. King that he will vote against the McCulloch Amendment to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965, but he will vote for the bill itself.

Birmingham Manifesto

This document boldly declares the stance of the oppressed Negro population of Birmingham, Alabama. Critiquing the validity of democracy, this manifesto speaks to the unjust treatment of the Negro as a second class citizen, including being "segregated racially, exploited economically, and dominated politically."

Letter from Lonnie MacDonald to MLK

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Lonnie MacDonald, a friend of the King family, encloses a song that she has written for Dr. King. She writes that the song was inspired by his commitment to freedom as reflected by his recent actions in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Richard L. Doerschuk to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Deputy director of the United States Information Agency, Richard Doerschuk requests that Dr. King participate in a television program to be broadcast in Africa on the topic of civil rights.

Letter from Robert Green to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

SCLC Education Director Robert Green writes Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach requesting a federal intervention on discrimination practices in Mississippi. Green complains that members of SCLC, SNCC, CORE and other organizations were denied access to restrooms during the 1966 James Meredith March Against Fear.

Letter from Glenn Smiley to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967

The Fellowship of Reconciliation asks Dr. King for assistance in obtaining a license to ship medical aid to North and South Vietnam.

MLK's Speech Notes

In these speech notes, Dr. King references the plight of the Jewish community in the Soviet Union and the silent betrayal of onlookers. John Donne is quoted in his famous excerpt, "No man is an island entire of itself, every man is a piece of the continent, a part of the main."

Letter from The Canadian Council of Christians and Jews to MLK

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

National Executive Director Richard Jones invites Dr. King to speak in Toronto during the celebration of Canada's centennial birthday. Jones describes current racial relations and acknowledges that the centennial events could be used to spur "advances toward complete equality."

Letter from Dr. King to anonymous

In a handwritten draft addressed simply to "gentleman," Dr. King expressed gratitude for having received a copy of a study entitled "Civil Disobedience: Morality and the Coming of the Civil War." So impressed with the contents of the book, Dr. King made it available to staff as reference resource.

Letter from Dr. King to Earnest Dale

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

This letter serves to acknowledge Earnest Dale's missed call to Dr. King and to thank Professor Dale for his support.

The Museum of Negro History and Art 1967 Calendar

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Distributed by the Museum of Negro History and Art, this calendar was used by Coretta Scott King and contains biographies of famous African American musicians. Mrs. King studied at the New England Conservatory to be an opera singer. On this calendar, she also marked April 27th as "my birthday."

Letter from Alfred Gallen to MLK

A Chicago native writes to Dr. King concerning his current social and political affairs. He suggests that Dr. King should redirect his efforts to empower the black community rather than utilizing government assistance. He asserts that his presence and activities have ignited negative race relations.