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"Tennessee (TN)"

Letter From Clifford Alexander Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, June 28, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Clifford Alexander Jr. thanks Dr. King for supporting him in his nomination as Chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Letter from Stephen J. M. Robbins to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Stephen Robbins thanks Dr. King for inviting the United States National Student Association to participate in the demonstrations in Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. Robbins states that the organization has directed its focus to equal opportunity for all and protection for demonstrators. Robbins also invites Dr. King to address the 18th National Student Congress at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

OEO Moves to Aid Hungry Families in Seven States

Wednesday, May 3, 1967
Washington, D.C., Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN)

The Office of Economic Opportunity initiates a new Food Stamp Loan program that will enable impoverished families to purchase "much needed" food.

Letter from Joan Daves to Howard Gotlieb

Monday, May 15, 1967
Boston, MA

Joan Daves responds to Mr. Gotlieb regarding a request to write Dr. King's biography from archival material in the possession of Boston University. At the present time and for various reasons, Dr. King has decided not to approve this project.

Letter from MLK to Miss Kathy Granata

Wednesday, January 31, 1962
New York (NY)

Dr. King responds to a previous letter from Kathy Granata hoping that her words reflect the attitudes and thinking of the majority of today's young people. The Reverend continues by addressing Granata's young friend, stating that his exposure to her may aid him toward discovery.

Editorial- "Lawlessness Means Bloodshed, End of Dreams"

Missouri (MO), California (CA)

In this article, light heavy-weight boxing champion Archie Moore discourages black Americans from resorting to "lawlessness" in their attempts to advance the cause of civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harvey L. Gault

Friday, March 30, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS), Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King informs Reverend Harvey Gault that he cannot accept the invitation to speak at Bethel A. M. E. Church. Dr. King lists some of his present and future commitments in explaining the capacity of his schedule.

Brief for the Petitioners

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Wisconsin (WI), Kentucky (KY), California (CA), Connecticut (CT), Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), New Hampshire (NH), South Carolina (SC), Rhode Island (RI), Maryland (MD), Virginia (VA), New York, NY, Florida (FL), Minnesota (MN), Georgia (GA)

This brochure illustrates questions as well as events pertaining to petitioners during the Civil Rights Movement. Important petitioners, such as Dr. King and Ralph David Abernathy, were convicted and charged with Contempt of Court in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

NAIRO Supports March for Freedom

Washington, D.C.

The National Association of Intergroup Relations Officials declares their support of the March for Freedom in Washington, D.C. NAIRO urges its members to support the march for the integration of over "20,000,000 Americans of minority identity."

Montesquieu

Dr. King references French social commentator Montesquieu regarding his ideas on history. King quotes, "He attempts to show how civilization has been modified by the action of the external world."

Letter from Joan Daves to Y. Katahira

Friday, June 26, 1964
New York (NY), JAPAN

Joan Daves writes Mr. Katahira asking for an update on an offer by Shinkyo Shuppan Sha for Dr. King's book "Strength To Love." She also asks Katahira to inform Tetsuo Kohmoto that Dr. King's current responsibilities and engagements are restricting him from writing the preface.

SCLC Annual Meeting

Nashville, TN

This program outlines the schedule of events for SCLC's 1961 annual meeting.

Letter from Leroy Johnson to MLK

Atlanta, GA

State Senator Leroy R. Johnson forwards a Senate Pass to Dr. King, and informs him of an open invitation to visit the Senate at his leisure.

1963 Income Statement for the SCLC

This document is a financial balance sheet for the SCLC for the fiscal period 9/1/63 to 8/31/64. The statement gives a breakdown of revenues and expenses and lists a net deficit of $50,622.59.

Telegram from MLK to Nicholas Biddle

Friday, March 16, 1962

Dr. King apologizes to Nicholas Biddle for being unable to attend the testimonial for Senator Jacob Javits.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from Fred Lofton

Written on SCLC stationary, Fred Lofton addressed this letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy. On behalf of his church, First African Baptist Church, Mr. Lofton pledged to continue to extend support for the work of SCLC.

The Mastery of Fear

This outline explains the direction of Dr. King's sermon entitled "The Mastery of Fear." In it, Dr. King explores the challenges and necessity of confronting fear.

Emotionalism in Religion

Dr. King records a quote from a book entitled "The Gift of Tongues, A Study in the Pathological Aspects of Christianity".

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

Monday, August 29, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), SOUTH AFRICA, Philadelphia, PA, Baltimore, MD, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Los Angeles, CA

This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.

Letter from George A. Wiley to Rev. Andrew Young

Monday, March 25, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

George A. Wiley writes Reverend Andrew Young and other staff of the SCLC regarding National Welfare Rights Organization's (NWRO) participation with the Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from MLK to Katharine Hightower

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this letter, Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at a community event hosted by the Saint James African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Letter from Willis C. Tabor to MLK

Tuesday, June 15, 1965
Chicago, IL, Selma, AL, Detroit, MI, Pennsylvania (PA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Missouri (MO)

In this letter from Willis C. Tabor to Dr. King Mr. Tabor requests an application for employment with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference after his dismissal as pastor of West Side Christian Parish.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer blames Dr. King for riots and turmoil taking place in America.

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Numbers regarding the topic of God.

Field Foundation Station on the Death of MLK

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY

A portion of the statement on the death of Dr. King from the Field Foundations states, "As at other times of national shame and self-despair, what is at issue now is how ell we as a nation shall respond morally and politically." The heart of this statement reminds readers that the "ugly scars of racism and poverty will not be eliminated in this country until the people will it to be done."

Memo to Organizations Interested in the Success of the Anti-Poverty Program

Wednesday, July 20, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Richard W. Boone requests Dr. King's support in assisting with the success of the Anti-Poverty Program.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, July 21, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of updates regarding the advertisement of "Why We Can't Wait". Joan Daves also discusses a conversation they previously had on the phone and gives an explanation of her actions.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Philip S. McConnell

Virginia (VA), VIETNAM

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mrs. McConnell for her support of his work. He also comments on the importance of adopting nonviolence principle to resolve conflicts internationally among nations, as well as to resolve social problems at home.

Letter from the Employees of Western Yard to MLK

Monday, June 1, 1964
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

The Employees of Western Yard of Detroit send a contribution to Dr. King. The employees highlight citizenship training, literacy education and voter registration as the top initiatives of the civil rights movement.

Letter from Michael George to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1968

Mr. George expresses his views on Dr. King's response to the riots Dr. King assisted in ending.