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Letter from Monica Wilson to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966

Monica Wilson reaches out to Dr. King on behalf of a student organization at the University of Cape Town to obtain a response to their invitation asking Dr. King to deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture.

Letter to Dora MacDonald from Joan Daves

Monday, December 12, 1966

Joan Daves writes to Ms. McDonald regarding Dr. King's availability, while he's away in New York. She also requests that a copy of the transcript, from a conference, be given to Dr. King as well as herself.

Program - Thompson Memorial Chapel-Williams College

Sunday, April 16, 1961

This document is a Sunday service program from Thompson Memorial Chapel at Williams College. Dr. King is noted as a guest preacher.

Our Struggle

Dr. King drafts this speech entitled "Our Struggle" for the April 1956 publication of Liberation. Dr. King discusses how both whites and blacks have internalized a caste system that perpetuates Negroes as inferior beings. He speculates that racial peace is maintained in the caste system due to harsh discrimination and a loss of faith in the black community. Dr. King states that the shift in race relations, and subsequent tension, occurred when Negroes "began to re-evaluate themselves," finding self-respect and dignity.

Telegram from the Faculty of Howard University School of Law to MLK

The faculty of Howard University's Law School offers to assist Dr. King in the fight against social injustice in Alabama.

Letter from James Godfrey to MLK

Monday, July 29, 1963

Mr. Godfrey invites Dr. King to speak at the Radio Music Hall in Washington D.C. for a fundraising event on behalf of the NAACP.

America

Dr. King quotes a statement from American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regarding the country's "historic situation in which the paradise of domestic security is suspended in a hell of global insecurity."

Letter to William H. Andrews from MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the members of the Georgia Family Circle's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the inability of the SCLC's continuance of the movement in Birmingham without their "dollars for freedom." He further expounds on the importance of their moral support.

"Ideal Traits"

In this article, the author confronts Dr. King's statement regarding Scandinavian countries. The author suggests that Dr. King does not have a full understanding of the culture and proceeds to enlighten him.

Letter from Valentina Borremans to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Valentina Borremans, Director of CIDOC, invites Dr. King to their upcoming summer seminar that will be attended by North American and Latin American intellectuals and leaders concerned with social change.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

Letter from Walter Davis, Jr. to MLK

Monday, April 11, 1966

Walter Davis, Jr. encloses a donation to SCLC sent all the way from the Congo. Mr. Davis expresses, "Of particular interest to us is the way in which you and your organization are able to get the participation of many groups who are interested in justice and social reform."

God Nature

Dr. King sketches his thoughts on Saint Thomas Aquinas' "investigation of God's nature."

Letter from Joan Sinkler to MLK

Joan Sinkler writes Dr. King expressing that she is disappointed with him for not mentioning "the racist and colonialist character" of the Vietnam War. Sinkler asserts that the US did not go to war to protect Hungary, Cuba or Tibet.

Letter from Robert T. Handy to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Robert Handy of the Union Theological Seminary invites Dr. King to be the "major evening speaker" for their Conference on Race and Religion.

Coretta's Personal Story

This telegram, dictated to Charles L. Sanders on the way back from the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremony, contains Mrs. Coretta Scott King's sentimental narrative of her acclaimed relationship with Dr. King. Revealing details that range from their meeting in 1951 through twelve years of marriage, Mrs. King admits she was immediately smitten by Dr.

Telegram To Dr. King Awarding A Grant

Thursday, June 29, 1967

In this telegram to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mr. Roberts of the Contracts Branch US Office of Education informs Dr. King that his proposal entitled, "A Demonstration - Basic Adult Education Project for Urban Negroes," has been approved.

King and SCLC Meet in Montgomery

This press release announces a mass meeting held in Montgomery, Alabama by the Executive Board of SCLC. The meeting was held in response to a major libel suit against four prominent SCLC officials. Dr. King gives an address to boost morale during the course of this suit. In Dr. King's view, "The South has lost its solidity. Whites fight against whites over desegregation. Be it known, evil cannot permanently organize itself." The libel suit came to be known as the New York Times Company vs. Sullivan (1960).

Card from Sophia Anderson to MLK

Mrs. Sophia Anderson wishes Dr. King a speedy recovery.

People in Action: Segregation And The Church

Saturday, February 2, 1963

In this New York Amsterdam News article of February 2, 1963, Dr. King mentions writer James Baldwin’s scathing indictment of the Christian Church and states that the Church has been complicit in the system of racial segregation or remained silent on racial injustice, the nation’s most urgent social ill. The church should be the headlight, he states, not the taillight and be true to the prophetic call for justice. King takes hope, however, having just attended the National Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, which brought together Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish leaders.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, April 17, 1967

J.Campe encloses payment from The Critic for "Where Do We Go From Here" permission fees.

Letter from Herman E. Talmadge to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Senator Herman E. Talmadge expresses his views on the poll tax with reference to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Letter from Tony Edwards to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964

Fourteen-year-old Tony Edwards writes Dr. King to ask for an autograph to add to his collection. He also thanks Dr. King "for making the Civil Rights Bill possible."

Can You Live Where You Want to Live?

George and Eunice Grier write regarding the topic "Can you live where you want to live?" This article discusses discrimination and segregation in housing. The Griers assert that integration in jobs and public places is advancing, but segregation in housing still plagues many people in America.

Letter from M. Rogers to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

M. Rogers objects to Dr. King's teachings and infers he should study the New Testament of the Bible. Mr. Rogers perceives that what Dr. King preaches causes "more resentment between the different races." He further elaborates on how he envisions the affects of "non-violence" and "civil disobedience."

The Influence of the Right and Left in the Civil Rights Movement

Sunday, January 31, 1965

Activist Bayard Rustin prepared these remarks for the Negro Leadership Conference in New York in January 1965. He discusses the influence of the American right, the traditional Communist left and the unaffiliated left (the Thirties veterans and the spontaneous left of Harlem and Mississippi).

Letter from R. D. Earnhardt to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

R.D. Earnhardt requests a meeting with Rev. Abernathy to discuss Dr. King's death and the plan to proceed with the "Poor People's March on Washington, DC.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Sunday, January 22, 1956

This is a church program for Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in early 1956. As Pastor, Dr. King gave a sermon on "Redirecting Our Missionary Zeal."

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee. He calls for strong federal action in the South to prevent violence and to uphold the decisions of the Supreme Court pertaining to the end of segregation.

MLK's handwritten notecard regarding Fact

On this notecard, Dr. King cites the definition of the word 'fact' from The Hibbert Journal, July 1933, according to Arthur Darby Nock.