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"Tennessee (TN)"

Letter from Jack Hopkins to Senator Morse

Saturday, May 6, 1967

In a letter to Senator Wayne L. Morse, Jack Hopkins addresses his personal issues with the United States. He begins with a discussion of the conflict in Vietnam, and believes the United States is handling it poorly. He then expresses his feelings on the Jewish race and the establishment of a Jewish nation. He concludes his letter saying that the United States never tries to solve problems; rather it creates the foundation for a new war.

Faith in Man

Dr. King discusses people's general lack of faith in man. He asserts that because of Christianity one can have faith in man because "man's plight is never so low that he can't do better."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Roselyn Silverman

Wednesday, January 4, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Roselyn Silverman of Dr. King's availability to speak at the University of Toledo in Ohio. She also informs Miss Silverman that Dr. King will be out of the country writing a book, so further inquiries regarding "new invitations" will be made upon his return.

Notes Regarding Civil Rights Act of 1965

This handwritten note describes the positive effects of the Civil Rights Act for Negroes. According to the notes, "What we have won in blood, toil and sacrifice we will not squander in apathetic complacency."

Letter from Cirilo McSween to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967

Cirilo McSween congratulates Dr. King for the reorganization of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Clarence G. Petersen to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966

Clarence G. Petersen tells Dr. King that he should avoid marching in the city of Cicero. Petersen describes Cicero as a slum with old houses and an oppressive, industrial atmosphere. While Petersen supports Dr. King's campaign, he believes it'd be best if the city were avoided for Dr. King's safety.

SCLC Press Release About a Mississippi Political Rally

Thursday, February 8, 1962

This press release describes a political rally of Negro voters in Clarksdale, Mississippi at which Dr. King spoke. It declares the need for voter registration and the possibility for Mississippi to have as many as five African-American congressmen in Washington.

Letter of Support from James Duren to MLK

Thursday, July 21, 1966

James Duren informs Dr. King that he was impressed by his speech at the Chicago Rally and requests a copy. He closes the letter with an inquiry about SCLC activity in Milwaukee.

Letter from Fernando DeEquidazu to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Students from Spain write Dr. King, showing their appreciation for his leadership to the Civil Rights Movement, and asks if Dr. King can supply them with articles for magazines in Spain.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Friday, May 5, 1967

Maurice A. Dawkins is requesting Dr. King to attend an infomal meeting, along with other civil rights leaders, to discuss the War on Proverty in the South.

Is Nonviolence Doomed To Fail?

Dr. King enumerates the accomplishments made in the fight for civil rights through nonviolent practices. Additionally, he utilizes this article in the Associated Negro Press to discredit the claim that nonviolence is losing shape in the United States.

New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Saturday, March 1, 1958

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

Letter from MLK to F. A. Bussey

Friday, March 23, 1962

Dr. King informs the National Morehouse College Alumni President that he will be unable to meet with a group of Morehouse men following his address at Howard University. His schedule is too hectic even though he would enjoy the "hours of fellowship."

Letter from Stephen R. Currier to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966

Stephen Currier invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a Christmas party at his place located at "666 Fifth Avenue on the 35th floor."

A New South A-Coming

This pamphlet discusses the courageous stand of African American high school students against racial discrimination in the South. The efforts demonstrated by these young people to bring about change of many undemocratic practices were significantly noted in Negro history.

God (His Love)

Dr. King writes that the answer to F. W. H. Myers' question about whether the universe is friendly lies at the basis of religion. His cites E. C. Wilm's "The Problem of Religion."

Arianism

Dr. King writes about Arianism, a view named after Arius of Alexandria. Arianism acknowledges the divinity of God the father and Jesus the son; however, under this doctrine Jesus is subordinate to God.

Letter to Ralph David Abernathy from Allen L. Johnson

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Southern Christian Leadership Conference board member Allen L. Johnson wrote this letter to Rev. Abernathy shortly after Dr. King's death. Johnson expressed his support of Rev. Abernathy's leadership of the organization.

Letter from Marjorie Heins to MLK and Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 14, 1967

Marjorie Heins informs the SCLC that the Campaign for Disarmament, a peace group in Germany, requests for Dr. King to give 5-10 lectures for about 2,000 - 3,000 people.

Letter from Chip Hawkins to MLK

Monday, January 2, 1967

In this letter, Chip Hawkins questions Dr. King's affiliation with communist organizations and individuals. In addition, he requests that Dr. King publicly address the Communist accusations brought against him.

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to MLK

Friday, June 14, 1963

Telegram from Bishop James K. Mathews to Dr. King congratulatiing him on his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail."

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Diana Melendez

Friday, April 5, 1968

Diana Melendez, a student at New York City's M.E.S. 146, wrote this letter to Coretta Scott King following a school assembly that announced the death of Dr. King. Melendez offers her condolences and writes that Mrs. King was truly lucky, as she "married a brave man."

Calvinism

Dr. King writes on the concept of Calvinism.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Smith

Friday, July 31, 1964

Dora McDonald writes William Smith of Fullerton Junior College on behalf of Dr. King, granting permission to reprint material from Time magazine regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

The Suffering Servant

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 53 presents a different view of the servant from chapters 42, 49 and 50. The concept of God's servant evolved from that of Israel as a nation, to the spiritual or inner Israel, to an individual who would take up the work that the others would not. King concludes that the prophecy was fulfilled in Jesus of Nazareth.

Correspondence - Mrs. King from The Alumni Association of Antioch College/ Alumni Fund 4/26/60

Tuesday, April 26, 1960

This 1960 fundraising letter is from the Alumni Association of Mrs. King's alma mater, Antioch College. The fundraising committee for the Alumni Association sent this appeal to Mrs. King as a request for her continued support.

Letter from James E. Baine to MLK about Commentary

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

In this letter James Baine asks Dr. King about segregation and integrated for reference to be used in a college class.

Letter from MLK and Others to President Dwight D. Eisenhower

Friday, January 11, 1957

A group of Southern religious leaders write to President Eisenhower concerning the extreme violence directed towards Negro people throughout the South. They request his immediate action to address the nation's moral and legal framework sustained by the presiding racial climate.

Telegram from Rev. Loe Champion to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Dr. King was the recipient of this Western Union telegram from Rev. Loe Champion of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket, an economic project of the SCLC. Rev. Champion sent this telegram to show support for Dr. King's struggles in the South. The correspondence was sent two days after a march Dr. King led in Memphis, Tennessee in support of striking sanitation workers.

Operation Breadbasket As Vision, Promise and Hope

This report discusses the socio-economic position of Negroes as it relates to education achievement, employment opportunities, and access to power and societal institutions.