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Letter From India to MLK

Friday, June 25, 1965

Ram Aurangabadkar and Dinkar Sakrikar of India write to Dr. King concerning his civil rights efforts in the United States. As a token of appreciation for Dr. King's work, they offer a bronze statue of Gandi on behalf of their society. Aurangabadkar and Sakrikar request that the statue be placed in a children's park.

Letter from David H. McKillop to MLK

Thursday, November 12, 1964

David McKillop informs Dr. King that the United States Consulate General in Barcelona received a letter from five Spanish citizens congratulating him for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Board of National Missions Writes the Editors of the Washington Post

Monday, October 24, 1966

George E. Todd, G. H. Jack Woodard, and Joseph W. Merchant send a letter to the Editors of the Washington Post regarding the Mississippi Action for Progress. They claim the organization is a tool for the destruction of the Child Development Group of Mississippi. Additional allegations are made that MAP was an instrument of the governor and legislature of Mississippi to stall school integration.

Letter from Butler Henderson to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Butler Henderson invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Dinner for the President of Morehouse College, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Letter from John Brooks to MLK

John Brooks affirms the importance of Dr. King's work and informs Dr. King of an enclosed contribution to the SCLC.

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

Thursday, April 13, 1967

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Letter from Clara Sturgas Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, December 19, 1961

Clara Sturgas Johnson sends Dr. King a Christmas card with an enclosed article about the integration marches in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Marilyn Sauer to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Marilyn Sauer, Administrative Assistant to Dr. L. M. McCoy, provides Dr. King with the address of the Archbishop of Recife. Sauer also informs Dr. King of the proper way to address the Archbishop.

Letter from Edward Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 18, 1966

Edward Kennedy thanks Dr. and Mrs. King for their hospitality during the Annual Convention of the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Lavera Davis

Monday, March 1, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church to speak at an upcoming Civil Rights Day event.

Religion and Race Memo

Friday, July 15, 1966

The Religion and Race organization distributes a memo to discuss the various topics involving the meaning of "black power", the United Presbyterians joint actions within the Mississippi March, the testimony's end in Wilcox County, and Project Equality.

Letter From Irving Neiman to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965

Irving Neiman offers his legal services to the SCLC for their work in the civil rights movement.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Letter from Canary McKay to MLK

Friday, February 4, 1966

Canary McKay shows her appreciation to Dr. King for the progress made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement. She also extends an invitation for King to speak at her church.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Faith"

In this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "Faith," Dr. King writes out some thoughts on the subject.

Sworn Deposition of MLK

Monday, December 10, 1956

Dr. King records an event that happened on a train between Nashville and Montgomery, during which a policeman denied him access to the general waiting room.

Annual Report Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Friday, October 1, 1965

Operation Breadbasket, unemployment, poverty, nonviolence, Negro voter registration, and a financial report are just several of the topics covered in this informational pamphlet detailing the ways in which monies were divided amongst the many functions of the SCLC.

Poor People's Campaign News

Friday, March 15, 1968

This newsletter shares details regarding the end of a historic meeting of American minority group leaders who declared unanimous support for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. The names of organizations and leaders pledging their support are also included.

American Negro Concert Pianist Undertakes 100 Cites Tour in Support of Haiti's Pan American Festival of the New World

Ambassador Bonhomme announces the Pan American Festival of the New World, proposed and implemented by Negro-American Concert Pianist Robert Pritchard. The festival's inauguration was held in Haiti in the summer of 1969. The event attracted students in the "Pan American hemisphere." The festival's main features focused on the establishment of three summer schools.

America

Dr. King quotes a statement from American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regarding the country's "historic situation in which the paradise of domestic security is suspended in a hell of global insecurity."

Letter from MLK to Blaine Marrin

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Blaine Marrin and the local 157 UAW members for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He explains the current efforts of the organization and the relationship between the labor and civil rights movements. He also discusses the financial needs of the SCLC and the importance of contributions.

Letter from Ann B. Houston to MLK

Sunday, January 28, 1968

In this letter Ann B. Houston of the American Friends Service Committee offers her gratitude for a contribution received from the Benevolence Club of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. She further states that the funds have gone to good use in South Vietnam towards the manufacture of artificial limbs using local immigrated labor.

Letter of Appreciation from Governor Richard J. Hughes to MLK

Thursday, August 29, 1963

In this letter, Governor of New Jersey, Richard Hughes expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his inspiring words to America on Freedom Day during Washington March.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Francis Robinson

Wednesday, May 25, 1966

Mrs. King expresses her appreciation for the opera tickets that Mr. Robinson gave to her and Dr. King.

Oxford Movement

Dr. King explains the Oxford Movement, a nineteenth century movement within the Anglican Church.

The Martin Luther King Column

This column, written by Dr. King, depicts his philosophy on the complete human life. He describes life to have three separate, yet connected dimensions. These dimensions are denoted as: length, breadth, and height. All are defined in great detail according to the Reverend's belief and experiences.

Cape Times: No Reply to Luther King Invitation

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

L. Marquard writes an article discussing the discontent that Dr. J. D. Vorster and Rev. J. A. Heynes had regarding Dr. King's honorary degree from the Vrye Universiteit of Amsterdam.

Letter from Erma Hughes to Dora McDonald

Saturday, March 14, 1964

Ms. Hughes, college President and Founder, advises Ms. McDonald to inform Dr. King that he should anticipate numerous invitations after an article appears in the newspaper announcing him as a guest at her college.

The Birth of a New Nation

Dr. King compares the ongoing civil rights struggle in the United States to the Hebrews' Exodus from Egypt.