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Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous writer blames Dr. King for riots and turmoil taking place in America.

MLK Index Card

Dr. King highlights James Breasted's views on Man, according to the book, "The Dawn of Conscience."

Letter from Adlai E. Stevenson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

US Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai Stevenson, informs Dr. King that they will have to postpone their meeting due to a U.N. Security Council meeting that Mr. Stevenson has to preside over.

Letter from LeRoy Collins of the U.S. Department of Commerce

The Director of Communtiy Relations Service for the U.S. Department of Commerce, LeRoy Collins, offers their partnership and support to the National Assembly on Progress in Eaquality of Opportunity in Housing and the National College Student Conference on Freedom of Residence. Each conference addresses the issue of discrimination; inequalitiesof residence and citizenship at the community level.

Donation from United States Trust Company

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Franklin D. Roosevelt III arranges to have one thousand dollars sent to the SCLC.

Letter from Missouri Prisoner Melvin Shepard to MLK

Melvin Shepard, a prisoner in the Missouri State Penitentiary, requests that Dr. King respond to his earlier letters. Shepard explains that Dr. King can help by sending "some young lawyers."

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites a scripture that deals with the topic of social ethics.

Letter from MLK to Ray Stewart

Dr. King thanks Ray Stewart for a song written in tribute to the Freedom Movement, but states that neither he nor the SCLC can underwrite the requested fee for use of the song.

Letter from Rosamond Reynolds to MLK

Rosamond C. Reynolds informs Dr. King that the Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association adopted a comprehensive Statement of Consensus on Racial Justice. The statement reflects "the preponderance of opinion of the denomination, its members, and its churches, on the problems of segregation, discrimination, racial violence, education, housing..."

Letter from Gordon Allott to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Gordon Alliot, a member of the United States Senate, sends his appreciation to Dr. King for his endorsement for a position on the "historic civil rights bill."

Letter from MLK to The Farmington Ministerial Association

Monday, January 30, 1967

This letter, dated January 30, 1967, was sent from Dr. King to the Farming Ministerial Association. In this letter, he thanks them for their contribution and apologizes for responding late. Their letter was accidentally placed in a folder entitled "Letters to be filed". He further goes on to state how he wishes they, along with other loyal contributors could know more directly how important their support is to the SCLC and all that it stands for.

Letter from Senator Clifford P. Case to MLK Regarding Poll Taxes as a Condition to Vote

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

New Jersey Senator Clifford Case informs Dr. King that he feels strongly about the elimination of poll taxes as a condition to vote, and he will do his best to push through a provision abolishing these taxes.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, encloses a memorandum that proposes that the Atlanta Student Movement performs the following actions: "educate and involve the community, convince the Atlanta Board of Education that 'everyone cares,' and force action from the Board."

Letter from Eugene G. Huston to Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Mr. Huston writes to request that the photos of Mrs. King and her daughter which appear on the cover of Life Magazine, April 1968 be widely distributed. Huston believes that if this is done the larger public will be just as moved as he was and further serve to promote the memory of Dr. King.

Letter from Harry B. Henderson Jr. to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967

Harry Henderson writes Dr. King in support of Dr. King's stance on Vietnam. Henderson expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's "clearout and moving" speech regarding the United State's presence in Vietnam and he feels that only clergymen can take an effective stance. He also discusses how the Vietnam War is used as a scapegoat to keep the government from having to deal with discrimination issues in America.

MLK Address at NAACP 53rd Convention

Thursday, July 5, 1962

Dr. King delivered this address to the NAACP's 53rd Annual Convention held in Morehouse College's gymnasium in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King argues that it is imperative to debunk the perceived myths concerning segregation and discrimination in order to foster a society free of racial inequalities.

Letter from Minister C. Vernon Lake to MLK About a Vietnam Strategy

Monday, January 15, 1968

Minister C. Vernon Lake writes Dr. King with an enclosure containing a new strategy for vietnam. His plan is built on the shoulders of the World War II "Marshall Plan."

Exodus

Dr. King wrote these note cards, marked "Class Notes," on Exodus. He focuses on the topics of knowledge, the doctrine of God, sin, ethics, social ethics, and the covenant.

MLK Letter to Mr. Abe Feinglass

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. King writes to Abe Feinglass of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen's Union, thanking him for the union's booklet on civil rights, "The Time Is Now." King also encloses a statement of endorsement.

High School Seniors in Chicago Request Conversation with MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

Edward Foreman, on behalf of the senior class at J.H. Bowen High School in Chicago, Illinois, invites Dr. King to lead a discussion regarding the issues that brought about Dr. King's adventure to Chicago.

Bibliography Compiled by MLK

This handwritten bibliography documents texts that discuss theology.

Letter from Malcolm R. La Place II to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1963

Malcolm La Place of WMAL TV News writes Dr. King regarding his address to the Capital Press Club. He hopes to arrange a videotape session as well.

Letter from Claudia Harris to MLK

Claudia Harris informs Dr. King that Dana College is participating in "Choice 68." She also requests material on Dr. King's position regarding the Vietnam War, civil rights, the urban crisis and the federal budget.

Letter from Constance Webb to MLK and Joan Daves

Thursday, March 2, 1967

In this letter, Constance Webb asks Dr. King to share more details about the comments Richard Wright made about "perhaps there was more behind the incident then simply a "mad" woman.", referring to the lady who stabbed Dr. King.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

Monday, February 10, 1958

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

Letter from Wallace Best to MLK

Sunday, April 25, 1965

Wallace Best encloses a donation to the SCLC but advises against purusing economic boycotts. According to Best, an economic boycott will "greatly demean the conduct of your noble cause....."

Telegram from the Nashville Student Movement to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960

The Nashville Nonviolent Student Movement writes to Dr. King in jail commending him for his courageous act, while urging him to remain in jail for the cause.

The Sword That Heals

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

Letter from Joan Daves to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Joan Daves expresses her gratitude toward Mrs. King for her support of her husband throughout his work in the Civil Rights Movement, following his receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Women Strike for Peace: How Can You Be Silent?

Thursday, April 1, 1965

This newsletter exemplifies the struggle that Vietnamese children faced during the war. It also urges many to protest in order to prevent young children from dying.