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Remember Who You Are!

Thursday, December 6, 1956

Dr. King addresses the student body and officials of Howard University with a poignant sermon entitled, "Remember Who You Are." The content of the sermon makes various references between Jesus, Shakespeare and Greek philosophers who sought to identify the mechanisms that made man important to society.

President Kennedy's Stand on Negotiation in Albany

In this statement made from the Albany, Georgia city jail where he was imprisoned, Dr. King expresses appreciation for President Kennedy's support of negotiation between Albany's City Commission and civil rights leaders.

Letter from Robert J. McCracken to MLK

Tuesday, February 4, 1964

Rev. McCracken, of Riverside Church in New York, informs Dr. King that he is scheduled to speak at two identical church services. The Church has added the second service because the New York World?s Fair will be open.

Minutes of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership Meeting

Wednesday, March 23, 1966

These minutes from the meeting of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership give a description of the topics discussed. Topics included: meeting with President Johnson, Office of Economic Opportunity memoranda, Inter-organizational conflict and fundraising.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Agenda

Friday, August 16, 1963

This document is a strategic outline for the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Letter from Beatrice Smith to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965

Beatrice Smith encloses a contribution to Dr. King and explains the interest and sympathy in Dr. King's work. She also expresses concern for the boycott of Alabama product stating that it might result in "more enemies than friends."

Letter from Mark Henderson to MLK

In this letter Mark Henderson comments on the incidents at the South Carolina State College in Orangeburg, South Carolina known as the Orangeburg Massacre.

A Thank You for Their Hospitality

Monday, August 13, 1962

Lawyer William Kunstler writes this thank you to Dr. and Mrs. King and discusses a few legal matters.

Financial Report of the SCLC Home Office - Atlanta, GA, 1965-1966

Monday, August 8, 1966

Jesse B. Blayton provides a summarized financial statement of cash receipts and disbursements for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference from July 1, 1965 to and including, June 30, 1966. This statement lists the allocations of funds for Operation Breadbasket, voter registration and political education initiatives, legal defense, and more.

Jesus: Divinity and Missions

In this series of note cards, Dr. King documents various biblical passages from the New Testament that discuss Jesus' divinity. The passages are abbreviated and listed with their biblical citations.

Letter from Walter Martin to SCLC Officials

Tuesday, February 28, 1967

Walter Martin of the American Friends Service Committee, writes to numerous SCLC officials concerning Quaker work in Southern Africa.

Letter from Ellen Silver to MLK

Mrs. Silver writes to Dr. King to inform him that his "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" will be edited for the publication of the textbook "The Triple Revolution: Social Problems in Depth."

Letter from MLK to Reverend Earl C. Scott

Thursday, September 13, 1962

Dr. King writes Reverend Earl C. Scott expressing appreciation for his words of encouragement and providing Reverend Scott with information regarding his current work towards social justice.

Letter from C.G. Gomillion to Dr. Randolph Blackwell

Wednesday, August 18, 1965

C.G. Gomillion writes Dr. Randolph Blackwell requesting reimbursement for paying the bail to release SCLC driver Walter Franklin. Franklin was arrested and released in Tuskegee, but was arrested again in Selma because the SCLC failed to pay his fine.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Diana Melendez

Friday, April 5, 1968

Diana Melendez, a student at New York City's M.E.S. 146, wrote this letter to Coretta Scott King following a school assembly that announced the death of Dr. King. Melendez offers her condolences and writes that Mrs. King was truly lucky, as she "married a brave man."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Cantor Mendelson regarding I Have A Dream

Tuesday, November 2, 1965

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Cantor Mendelson that Dr. King is pleased to know that the Men's Club of Beth Sholom is interested in setting to music excerpts from "I Have a Dream." McDonald refers Mendelson to Clarence Jones, an attorney who handles such matters.

Letter from the Mayor of Jerusalem to MLK

Friday, February 3, 1967

Teddy Kollek, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Israel, expresses appreciation and support for Dr. King's planned pilgrimage to the Holy Land. At the time of this letter, West Jerusalem was Israeli territory and East Jerusalem part of Jordan. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

An Ambitious Dream Confronts Reality

Wednesday, June 23, 1965

Dr. King talks about the Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE) as well as the political changes that have occurred in Georgia.

Book Outline: Education and the Urban Poor

This book outline lists the chapters and contributing authors of the publication "Education and the Urban Poor." The authors represented include educational professionals from all over the country including Robert L. Green, Associate Professor at Michigan State University and Education Director for the SCLC. Dr. King is listed as the author of Chapter Two entitled "Education and the Negro Revolution."

Advertisement for Ku Klux Klan Segregation Meeting

This advertisement invites every white person who supports segregation to attend an upcoming meeting sponsored by the Ku Klux Klan.

Men Who Live Differently

James E. Will shares a Christian perspective on conformity and its relation to humanity and God.

Letter from Henry Morgenthau to MLK

Thursday, July 18, 1963

In this letter Mr. Morgenthau of WGBH Radio thanks Dr. King for his for participation in "For Freedom Now."

Notice from Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Here is a letter to stimulate local civil rights organizations to undertake visits to House and Senate members during Easter Recess. The visits were to push for legislative goals such as "at least a million jobs for the hardcore unemployed, decent low cost housing for all and repeal of punitive welfare restrictions." The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights issued this notice, in the days following Dr. King's assassination.

Crisis and The Church

Dr. King emphasizes the important role of the Church in the midst of a global political and social shift. He explores in detail the steps necessary to implement changes through the Church and its' constituents.

Notecard Regarding Capitalism

This notecard quotes Walter Rauschenbusch's thoughts on capitalism.

Which Way for the Negro Now?

Monday, May 15, 1967

In his thirteenth civil rights cover story, Newsweek General Editor Peter Goldman reports on a movement in crisis, with fragmented leadership, impatient black followers, and increasingly alienated white supporters. Goldman and reporters interviewed top leadership ranging from the Urban League’s Whitney Young to black power advocate Stokely Carmichael. This article asks what will become of the Negro Revolution.

Letter from MLK to C.W. Greene

Thursday, August 10, 1967

In this letter to C.W. Greene of the Atlanta Life Insurance Company, Dr. King requests supplies for an upcoming convention.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Richard Russell

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King conveys his well wishes to Mr. Russell for a speedy recovery.

Letter from John H. Johnson to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

John H. Johnson, President and Editor at Johnson Publishing Company, informs Dr. King that a soldier has donated money to his organization and the NAACP.

Letter from C. Alexander Brown to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

C. Alexander Brown requests that Dr. King and the SCLC conduct an investigation on the conditions of black prisoners in American jails. After reading about cruel conditions in an Arkansas prison, Brown questions how many innocent black prisoners are confined.