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Letter from MLK to T. C. Johnson

Monday, September 9, 1963
Iowa (IA)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. T. C. Johnson for her contribution to the SCLC and encloses an official receipt for her gift. King states, "Without your moral support we would be caught in a dungeon of despair."

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964
New York (NY)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

Letter from Robert Lee King to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

A member of Ebenezer Baptist Church expresses concern over Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham Jail. Robert Lee King also shares his wish that he could physically be in jail as well to aid in the "freedom of all Americans." Though nothing in the letter has been blocked out, the letter does contain a stamp of the word "censored."

Advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 25, 1964
Birmingham, AL

Under the Additional Listings section of this magazine is a review about Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from MLK to E. C. Smith

Wednesday, December 19, 1962
Washington, D.C., Florida (FL)

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Rev. Smith's invitation to speak at Metropolitan Baptist Church and apologizes for his tardy response. Dr. King discusses the "People-To-People" tour of the south and declines the invitation due to his busy schedule.

Letter from MLK to Dr. A.S. Markham

Thursday, January 21, 1965

Dr. King apologetically informs Dr. Markham that he will be unable to attend an event held in his honor to receive the Brotherhood Society of Beth Shalom 1965 award.

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
New York (NY), VIETNAM

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.

Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Monday, February 19, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan

Norman Thomas sends Dr. King an enclosure, which supports Senator Fulbright's statements concerning the use of nuclear weapons in Vietnam. He asks Dr. King to stand in solidarity with him on this issue by adding his name to the statement.

Letter from S.Leiss to MLK Regarding Dutch Publication Rights

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

S. Leiss sent Dr King this satement regarding a payment for the Dutch rights to "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from Leslie Cohen to MLK

New York (NY)

Leslie Cohen informs Dr. King that Miss Egnal's eighth grade classes from Great Neck South Junior High School in New York have each elected him their "Man of the Year" over all other world leaders.

Letter from the US Civil Service Commission to Helyn M. Brooks

Friday, March 26, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

The United States Civil Service Commission informs Mrs. Helyn M. Brooks of her prospects for consideration for appointment in a civil service position.Mrs. Brooks' prospects section estimate is listed as poor.

Letter from Robert M. Gomsrud to MLK Regarding the Nobel Prize

Thursday, November 12, 1964
Minnesota (MN)

In this letter, Robert M. Gomsrud, President of the Minneapolis Central Labor Union Council, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Barnard Holliday

Friday, November 29, 1963
Rhode Island (RI), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Reverend Holliday, Pastor at Pond Street Baptist Church, thanking him for his contribution and words of encouragement. Dr. King also encloses a receipt for his donation.


Dr. King quotes Adolf Hitler on the "dirty and degrading self-mortification" of conscience and morality, from Erich Meissner's "Confusion of Faces."

Letter from Michael Bennett to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964
Ohio (OH)

In this letter, Mr.Michael Bennett expresses how delighted the NAACP is knowing Dr. King will lecture on Kent State University's campus.


Dr. King outlines epistemological claims that deal with the "universals" and the "particulars" of knowledge. In doing so, he references the philosophical views of Socrates and St. Thomas Aquinas.

Letter from Dave G. Pettigrew to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Dave Pettigrew, the Campus Coordinator for Choice '68 at the University of South Florida, invites Dr. King or "any of his representatives" to speak to the University. If someone is able to attend, Pettigrew requests information on their candidate and their potential responses to the three referendum questions listed.


Dr. King writes on Herbert Spencer's interpretation of the mind.

The Central Presbyterian Church Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966
Denver, CO, JORDAN

Elmer Elsea enlightens Dr. King on how his involvement with the previous Holy Week brought joy and blessings. Mr. Elsea discovers Dr. King will be returning to the Holy Land of Jerusalem for the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom. Mr. Elsea encourages Dr. King to utilize Citexco Tours to conduct his expedition.

Voter Registration Campaige in Atlanta

Atlanta, GA

This document provides a historical reference of voter registration campaigns held in Atlanta, Georgia. The information includes participating organizations as well as strategies and overall goals.

WBTV Editorial: "King's Bedfellows"

Monday, February 19, 1968
North Carolina (NC), PUERTO RICO, Cambridge, MA, Washington, D.C.

The content of this document suggested that Dr. King break ties with leaders Stokley Carmichael and H. Rap Brown, due to their stance on violence as a weapon. At the bottom of this document, is an invitation for Dr. King, H. Rap Brown and Stokley Carmichael to respond.

Letter From E. Spencer Parsons to MLK

Thursday, June 8, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

E. Spencer Parsons, Dean of the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel at the University of Chicago, invites Dr. King to preach at a university religious service. He also commends him for the leadership he has provided Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

Letter from Reverend Aaron T. Hoggard to MLK

Wednesday, August 14, 1963
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Reverend Aaron T. Hoggard, Minister of the Washington Street A. M. E. Zion Church, encloses a contribution to assist with Dr. King's efforts to help blacks achieve liberty.

Handwritten Notes on Science and Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brightman's views on Science and Religion.

Letter from Congressman John McCormack to MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressional House Speaker John McCormack writes that he is very glad the McCulloch Substitute Bill was rejected by the House of Representatives.

David T. Doherty Letter of Request to Dr. King

Friday, February 10, 1967
California (CA)

Mr. Deherty, a PH.D candidate at Stanford University, asks Dr. King if he will answer a few questions regarding the influence of Henry David Thoreau on his philosophy of non-violence.

MLK in Memoriam

Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

Following Dr. King's assassination, this tribute highlights King's life and the impact he had on the world. It includes a reading from "The Negro American: A Documentary History," an audio recording of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream Speech" and his eulogy. test2

Letter from James R. Cary to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964
Wisconsin (WI)

A representative from the Southwest Wisconsin Education Association invites Dr. King to serve as the keynote speaker at the organization's annual convention. The executive secretary tells Dr. King that they are interested in his "experience with education in the south and the entire United States," and feel that he would greatly enhance the convention by delivering the keynote speech. The sender also congratulates Dr. King on his recent "Man of the Year" honor by Time Magazine.