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Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to President Johnson

Wednesday, December 22, 1965

Rev. Abernathy urges President Johnson to meet with a group of poverty-stricken people from Syracuse, New York at Johnson's Texas White House.

A Decade of SCLC

In this 10th Anniversary Journal for the SCLC, there are several topics covered to highlight the ten years of activity of the organization. Beginning with a story of the Civil Rights Movement's beginning, featuring Rosa Parks, to an article entitled "Where Do We Go From Here?"; this booklet summarizes many of the efforts made during the ten year existence of the SCLC.

Post Card Front from Alice and Jun Hayakawa to Coretta King

The Hayakawa family send this photo greeting to Mrs. King, addressing her as "Corrie." The family expresses their concern for Mrs. King and hopes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King following a recent accident.

Telegram from St. James Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, September 23, 1958

Rev. W.C. Barnett, pastor of St. James Baptist Church, sent this telegram expressing well wishes, from his congregation, towards Dr. King.

Spelman College Founders Day

Sunday, April 10, 1960

This is a program for Spelman College's Seventy-Ninth Anniversary Founders Day celebration, which featured an address by Dr. King.

Letter from Swedish Student Katarina Andersson to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

Katarina Andersson, a young Swedish girl, thanks Dr. King for the inspiration his book "Why We Can't Wait" has provided her. She expresses her keen interest in the American civil rights movement and her hope to study in the United States in the future.

Letter from Sylvester Webb to MLK

Thursday, December 23, 1965

Sylvester Webb, Sponsor of the Sixth Grade Graduating Class Gift for Edward Gideon Public School in Philidelphia, informs Dr. King that an oil portrait of him was commissioned by sixth grade class. Webb request King's appearance or one of his advisers for the ceremony to place the portrait in the school lobby. Dr. King would later send Reverend Walter Fauntroy of the SCLC's Washington bureau to represent him.

Letter about Publication with Reprint of MLK's Remarks

Thursday, December 28, 1967

In this letter, Paul Kurtz, the editor of the Humanist, asks Dr. King to look over and comment on the enclosed copy of his piece that will be printed in Humanist.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack Delano

Tuesday, July 6, 1965

Dr. King accepts Mr. Delano's invitation to appear for an hour on WIPR-TV during his visit to Puerto Rico.

Letter from MLK to Melvin W. Trent

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King recommends that Melvin W. Trent file a complaint with the Civil Rights Commission about the unjust labor situation in Newport News.

Telegram from MLK to Men of Conscience

Friday, March 31, 1967

Dr. King writes the Men of Conscience at Morehouse College to commend their "group act to find a creative alternative to the military." He assures the group that they have his prayers and support, and expresses hope that he will be able to meet with them soon.

Letter from MLK to Ray Stewart

Dr. King thanks Ray Stewart for a song written in tribute to the Freedom Movement, but states that neither he nor the SCLC can underwrite the requested fee for use of the song.

Letter from Mr. Cass Canfield to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

In this letter Mr. Canfield Of Harper & Row, Publishers, informs Dr. King that a certificate of recognition from the National Conference of Christians and Jews for "Where Do We Go From Here?" is being sent to him as an award. Mr. Canfield expresses his belief the book will continue to sell.

Letter from Secretary to Daniel C. Thompson

Tuesday, December 11, 1962

Dr. King's Secretary writes Dr. Daniel Thompson of Howard University and encloses a foreword written by Dr. King, discussing violence and the philosophies of Mahatma Gandhi.

MLK at a Communist Training School

This document depicts prominent civil rights and political leaders allegedly at a communist training school. This anti-King document asks the question, "what kind of American are you?"

Letter from MLK Requesting Support

Saturday, August 1, 1964

Dr. King sent this letter soliciting donations for the SCLC following the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He says there is gratifying compliance with desegregation in some areas and renewed defiance elsewhere. ?Responsibility is as important as militancy,? King writes, in challenging segregation and discrimination. The SCLC pledges both.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Rustin requests that Dr. King assents to being a member of the "Institute's Board of Advisory Directors".

Letter from MLK to Ernest Gruening

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Ernest Gruening, a United States Senator from Alaska, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Robert Kennedy writes to Dr. King to express his support for the Civil Rights Movement and the strive to preserve the basic values of freedom and dignity throughout the world. Lastly, Robert Kennedy sends Dr. King a series of speeches he made in January and wish to hear Dr. King's reactions to them.

Letter from Benjamin Singleteary to MLK

Thursday, December 16, 1965

Benjamin Singleteary, a student at Shortridge Junior High School in Indianapolis, requests Dr. King's autograph and other information for a class project on outstanding people.

Letter from Billy E. Bowles to MLK about an Interview

Monday, March 27, 1967

In this letter Billy E. Bowles requests an interview with Dr. King. Bowles is especially interested in Dr. King's perception of the new governor, Governor Maddox.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Babcock for her substantial contribution and lets her know that her continued generosity and abiding faith in the cause have served to sustain and renew the strength of the SCLC.

Poor People's Campaign

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Dr. King is touring the nation to meet poor people in an effort to expose their living conditions. He also wants them to join the campaign to fight for better housing and jobs.

Letter from Byron L. Johnson to MLK

Saturday, January 14, 1967

Byron L. Johnson questions the accountability and lack of trust within the House of Representatives. Furthermore, Mr. Johnson suggest the House of Representatives create a new code of ethics, observe due process of law, and ensure the financial validity of all candidates.

Letter from Gunnar Magnus to MLK Requesting Interview

Tuesday, October 18, 1966

Mr. Magnus, a Norwegian journalists and student at Davidson College in North Carolina, requests Dr. King grant an interview for his paper, the "Morgenbladet".

Letter from Mary T. Clark to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

This letter from the Social Action Secretariat, National Federation of Catholic College Students references an enclosed letter which was issued to all member colleges. The enclosed letter supports student activity in the 1964 Freedom Fast.

Letter from Duane Brown to MLK

Duane Brown requests an autograph of Dr. King because of his appearance on the cover of Newsweek Magazine.

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

Around The World Pilgrimage Proposal

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

Mr. W Emerson Smith appoints Dr. King and Mr. Abernathy as leaders of a proposed pilgrimage around the world. Mr. Smith outlines the estimated costs and planned itinerary along with profits for the SCLC.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.