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Letter from Pastor Sutton-Branch to SCLC

Monday, April 8, 1968
Chicago, IL

In this letter Pastor Sutton-Branch, of the Commonwealth Community Church in Chicago, sends condolences and donations to the SCLC, while urging the recipient to extend sympathy to Mrs. King, for the loss of her husband.

Letter From Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler

New Jersey (NJ)

Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler sends their support and best wishes to the S.C.L.C, C.O.R.E, and S.N.C.C for their efforts towards violence, Vietnam, and human dignity.

Powell's Court Suit Challenged by House Move

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Florida (FL), Massachusetts (MA), Washington, D.C.

Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, the first black Congressman from New York State, files a suit with the federal court to regain his congressional seat after being excluded from Congress due to "unauthorized travel at taxpayers' expense and payroll padding." This newspaper article briefly details Powell's suit and The House of Representatives' response to the charge. The case would eventually be heard by the Supreme Court in Powell vs. McCormack, leading to the Federal Contested Elections Act in 1969.

Correspondence to Dr. King from Chuck Wallis, 11/15/1962

Thursday, November 15, 1962
New York (NY)

Chuck Wallis, of Keuka College in New York, wrote to Dr. King at the request of Melvin Arnold an executive at Harper and Rowe Publishing Company. In the letter Wallis informs Dr. King of his editing responsibilities for a forthcoming book project highlighting Dr. King's sermons and requests a face to face meeting to discuss revisions.

Letter from MLK to Thomas R. Jones

Monday, July 29, 1963
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King thanks the Honorable Thomas R. Jones for his financial and moral support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Calvinism

Dr. King writes on the concept of Calvinism.

Brief for the Petitioners

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Wisconsin (WI), Kentucky (KY), California (CA), Connecticut (CT), Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), New Hampshire (NH), South Carolina (SC), Rhode Island (RI), Maryland (MD), Virginia (VA), New York, NY, Florida (FL), Minnesota (MN), Georgia (GA)

This brochure illustrates questions as well as events pertaining to petitioners during the Civil Rights Movement. Important petitioners, such as Dr. King and Ralph David Abernathy, were convicted and charged with Contempt of Court in violation of the First and Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution.

Secular

Dr. King identifies the origin of the term secular as "meaning 'century,' that in time as distinguished from eternity." He explains that eternal things were more important that the things deemed to be belonging only to the present.

Address for the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights

Thursday, May 17, 1962

This address was delivered by Dr. King at the Formation of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights event on May 17, 1962. Dr. King opens by discussing various anniversaries that coincide with the event and represent similar struggles for justice including the Supreme Court school desegregation ruling, the Emancipation Proclamation, and Henry David Thoreau's death.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King agrees that the United Civil Rights Leadership Council should be dissolved.

The Power of Nonviolence

Thursday, May 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Berkeley, CA

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.

Letter from Rembert Stokes to MLK

Monday, December 16, 1963
Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH

The President of Wilberforce University anticipates Dr. King's speech before a delegation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Rembert Stokes also notes that Dr. King would receive a donation following his address, to help support the civil rights movement. Stokes wishes that Dr. King's message would center around the AME church leadership's involvement in the freedom struggle.

Letter from MLK to Leslie Dunbar

Monday, August 22, 1966
New York, NY, Tennessee (TN), Memphis, TN, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes to Dr. Leslie Dunbar to assure her that the SCLC was indeed ready and able to administer CEP Grant Funds for that school year.

Jesse Jackson Gets New SCLC Assignment

Monday, November 21, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC), Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA)

The Chicago Daily Defender highlights Dr. King's appointment of Rev. Jesse Jackson as head of the Special Projects and Economic Development Department of the SCLC.

Letter from R. Elliot to Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 14, 1968
San Francisco, CA, CANADA, New York (NY)

In this response letter, R. Elliot thanks Dora McDonald for her response to his inquiry regarding the redevelopment of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA

John Lewis relays his appreciation for the advanced copy of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Mrs. Ray Mitchell to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Ray Mitchell constructs this thoughtful letter to Dr. King thanking him not only for sending her a copy of his book, "Strength to Love," but also for his diligence as a clergyman.

Telegram from the SCLC to Rev. John Golden

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Staff from the SCLC and Citizenship Education Program telegram Reverend John Golden informing him that all expenses will be paid for the trip to Georgia.

Coretta's Personal Story

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Oslo, Norway, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL)

This telegram, dictated to Charles L. Sanders on the way back from the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremony, contains Mrs. Coretta Scott King's sentimental narrative of her acclaimed relationship with Dr. King. Revealing details that range from their meeting in 1951 through twelve years of marriage, Mrs. King admits she was immediately smitten by Dr.

Letter from Erma Jewel Hughes to Wyatt Tee Walker

Friday, May 8, 1964
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Erma Jewel Hughes requests Reverend Wyatt Walker to send two thousand copies of the "SCLC Story" to be sold by Erma Hughes Business College. Erma Hughes ensures a protection detail will be assigned to Dr. King during the entire time he is in Texas for the commencement speech given at the college.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK 7/25/1967

Tuesday, July 25, 1967
New York, NY

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row Publishers, drafted this correspondence to Dr. King. Mr. Canfield was delighted to inform Dr. King of the impressive sales of his last book. He acknowledged that reorders for Dr. King's book came to an amazing $1,020, the best in comparison to bestsellers and wholesale stores. The book being referred to, in this document, would be Dr. King's most prophetic, entitled, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

NAACP Fight For Freedom Fund and Awards Dinner

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), California (CA), Maryland (MD), Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, Pennsylvania (PA), Tennessee (TN), Memphis, TN, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Florida (FL), Kansas (KS), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Washington (WA), New Jersey (NJ), Indiana (IN), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Texas (TX), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King gives the address at the 1962 NAACP Fight for Freedom Fund and Awards Dinner held at Morehouse College. Coretta Scott King is the soloist.

Letter from MLK to Richard C. Ernst

Wednesday, August 23, 1961
New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, McComb, MS

Dr. King writes Richard Ernst and thanks him for his generous contribution which "has tangibly resolved a part of the difficulty we face in the legal defense of Rev. Abernathy." Dr. King highlights some the programs the SCLC has been able to implement due to contributions, such as the Citizenship School Training Center and voter registration drives.

Letter from Clara Sturgas Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, December 19, 1961
Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

Clara Sturgas Johnson sends Dr. King a Christmas card with an enclosed article about the integration marches in Albany, Georgia.

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Wednesday, May 1, 1963
Virginia (VA), Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), North Carolina (NC), Washington, D.C., McComb, MS, Greenwood, MS

This pamphlet details the history, programs and purpose of The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Pledge Card: Get Rid of Wallace

Alabama (AL)

This adverse advertisement published by the SCLC encourages Negro residents of Alabama not to vote for Governor George Wallace.

Immortality

Dr. King finds the best description of the unknowable nature of immortality in the New Testament of the Bible. It is a fragment of 1 Corinthians 2:9 regarding heaven.

Letter from Mrs. Uvee Mdodana-Arbouin to MLK

Friday, August 2, 1963
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL

Mrs. Mdondana-Arbouin, President of the Women's Auxiliary of the Progressive Baptist National Convention, sends Dr. King the lyrics to the poem she delivered at their organization's recent dinner.

Telegram from Nathaniel Tillman Jr. to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

The Washington, D.C. chapter of Morehouse College Alumni invites Dr. King to speak at its first annual Public Affairs Forum. The organization suggests a topic of "The Negro 100 Years After Emancipation."

OEO Extends Contract with National Council of Negro Women

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL), GEORGIA

This press release from the Office of Economic Opportunity highlights a technical assistance program designed to stimulate home ownership among poor Negro women in the deep South.