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Letter from E. Cowles Andrus to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967
Maryland (MD), CANADA, Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Cowles Andrus commends Dr. King a speech made in Washington. Having donated in the past, Mrs. Cowley Andrus was so impressed and inspired by the speech that she increased her contribution with hope it would be of great benefit.

Schleiermacher (The Social Implication of Religion)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Statement to Be Used If There is a Victory for Reagan

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Maryland (MD)

SCLC prepares a contingency statement, with Dr. King's handwritten edits. The statement asserts that some elections' newly overt racism reflects the prejudice and bigotry in America. The statement calls on Negroes to collaborate with honest white allies to gain legal and moral rights.

Financial Document-Receipt from Ramparts Magazine

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
New York, NY

This note references a check sent to Dr. King by Ramparts Magazine for monies received for the use of his Riverside Church Speech.

Letter from Clarence Long to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965
Washington, D.C., Maryland (MD)

Congressman Long writes Dr. King delighted to inform him of his full support regarding home rule for the District of Columbia.

Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller on Church Bombing

Monday, September 16, 1963
New York, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller comments on the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombings and expresses his sympathy to the families of the four children who were killed.

Letter from Harris McDowell, Jr. to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

Representative Harris McDowell, Jr. writes Dr. King stating that he voted against seating the Mississippi delegation. McDowell states, "I appreciate having your views regarding this important problem."

Letter from Harold Eggers to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

In this letter Harold Eggers, a White supremacist, criticizes the African American race, for what Eggers perceives as an inability to recognize "real leadership ability." However, he does this while commending Dr. King for possessing "real leadership ability."

Letter from Shelia Mills to MLK

Sunday, December 13, 1964
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Shelia Mills, a 7th grade student, commends Dr. King for his efforts within the nonviolence movement and for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Eleanor Bell Barnard to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967
VIETNAM

Eleanor Bell Barnard expresses her appreciation for Dr. King's position on Vietnam and Civil Rights. Ms. Barnard also describes to Dr. King how his work is motivation to those who are unemployed.

Ralph David Abernathy: A Man of the People

Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Memphis, TN, Albany, GA, Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH, St. Augustine, FL

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference published this booklet profiling Ralph David Abernathy. The articles describe his background, how he got involved in the Civil Rights Movement and the future of the SCLC under his leadership.

Letter from Arthur C. Holden to MLK Requesting Publication Review

Monday, December 11, 1967
New York, NY

Arthur C. Holden sends his paper entitled "The Negro, The Small Group, And Our Slum Problem" to Dr. King for review.

We Would See Jesus

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King summarizes a biblical passage from the Book of John, in which he describes "inquiring Greeks" from a rich heritage who came to Philip and made the simple request, "sir, we would see Jesus." These words are also the title of one of Dr. King's sermons delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Lenin

The role of State in Society is described as Dr. King documents a quote from the book "The State and Revolution" written by Vladimir Lenin.

Letter from Mary Eunice to MLK

Saturday, June 13, 1964
California (CA), St. Augustine, FL

Mary Eunice writes Dr. King offering her appreciation for the program he held in San Diego, California. Ms. Eunice notifies Dr. King that she will send him pictures from the program.

Letter from Marc Steel to Rev. R.D. Abernathy about a Term Paper

Saturday, April 27, 1968
Baltimore, MD

Marc Steel, a high school sophomore from Maryland, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy, requesting information on his role in the Civil Rights Movement. This student sought to acquire a narrative of Rev. Abernathy and his goals for SCLC, in order to complete a term paper.

Urban Strategy Conference and Demonstration Participants

Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

This document lists attendees of the Urban Strategy Conference who also went to a demonstration in Washington, D. C.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in a Bon Voyage to Europe

Thursday, January 29, 1959
Indiana (IN)

The Fair Share Organization presents Dr. King in a "Bon Voyage to Europe." Dr. King will be delivering an address for Indiana Reverend Julius James, a former Morehouse College classmate of Dr. King's. Also included are advertisements of people and businesses who donated to the Fair Share Organization.

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Monday, May 25, 1964
Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. William Machesney

Tuesday, January 9, 1962
California (CA)

Dr. King communicates with Mrs. William Machesney of Compton, California regarding her letter about children who need help. Dr. King recommends that Machesney pursue her initiative and encourages her to solicit the support of the State of California.

Letter to Mr. Otwell from Dr. King Regarding the Request for an Article for the Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, March 30, 1964
Chicago, IL

Dr. King informs Mr. Otwell that, due to prior obligations, he will not be able to write the article for the Sunday edition as requested. However, he assures Mr. Otwell that he will look into the possibility of editing a section of "Why We Can't Wait" to be published instead.

Letter from Arlen B. Makler and Alfred J. Lindh to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1966
Delaware (DE)

Mr.Makler and and Mr.Lindh provide details for the Delaware Citizens Housing Conference that Dr. King has contingently agreed to participate in. The overall purpose of the conference is to explore race relations as it pertains to "equal opportunity in housing".

Letter from Robert A. Goldwin to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Robert A. Goldwin informs Dr. King that he is enclosing four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation." Goldwin hopes Dr. King will enjoy reading the essays.

Freedom

Dr. King writes on the topic of "freedom," according to Jeremiah 1:5.

Letter from Mike Epstein to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967
Connecticut (CT), VIETNAM

Mr. Epstein thanks Dr. King for his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement and his stance on the war in Vietnam. Epstein considers Dr. King's status as "a man of judgment" an asset.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Hugh Morrow

Monday, June 25, 1962
New York, NY

Wyatt Tee Walker writes to Hugh Morrow expressing his grievance for the attack of Governor Rockefeller.

Evil (Psalm)

Dr. King notes that Psalm 73 raises the question of why the wicked prosper and suggests that the only solution for the mystery of evil is faith.

The SCLC and Leadership of MLK

INDIA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

The various protest mechanisms and action organizations serves as a long lasting contribution to the Negro community initiated by the movement in the South. The church has served as a location for organization which progresses community participation. During slavery, the slaves were allowed to congregate only at weddings and funerals. Many of these events were fabricated in order to create a means of collective communication between the slaves. The author asserts that it was in this tradition that the SCLC was formed.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), New York, NY, New York (NY), Tallahassee, FL, Florida (FL), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), West Virginia (WV), Birmingham, AL, New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.