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"Tuskegee, AL"

Memo from Tom Offenburger to SCLC Field Staff

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

Tom Offenburger released this memo to members of SCLC's field staff concerning the advertisement of the 1968 Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from Roland Smith to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1956
Nashville, TN, Montgomery, AL, Tennessee (TN), Alabama (AL)

Roland Smith requests that Dr. King prepare a list of themes for the Baptist Training Union. Smith encloses a copy of themes from the previous year for Dr. King to use as a template.

Letter from Leonard Manning to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Leonard Manning offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from MLK to Louis O. Kelso

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Attorney Louis O. Kelso for sending him an autographed copy of, "How to Turn Eighty Million Workers into Capitalists on Borrowed Money."

Letter from T. Jansma to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965
NETHERLANDS

The General Secretary of the Baptists in the Netherlands praises Dr. King for receiving an honorary degree from Vrije Unversiteit in Amsterdam and inquires if he is available to deliver any speeches in the Netherlands during the same time period.

Letter from Kerry Clayton to MLK 11/20/66

Sunday, November 20, 1966
California (CA)

Kerry Clayton informs Dr. King that she was asked to do a third grade report about his life. She also requested for Dr. King to send a picture to include in the report. Kerry Clayton was a resident of China Lake, California.

Financial Breakdown on the Basis of Individual Contributions

Dr. King illustrates the financial breakdown of individual financial contributions over the course of a year, broken down by number of people and amount per person.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

New York, NY

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Letter from Kennon Brownlee to MLK

Thursday, October 12, 1967
Texas (TX), Dallas, TX, VIETNAM

Kennon R. Brownlee, a social science major at Bishop College, asks Dr. King for his opinion concerning the war in Vietnam.

Telegram from Tuskegee Students and Teachers to the SCLC

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
Tuskegee, AL

Teachers and students from Tuskegee write members of the SCLC to express their support for the upcoming mobilization and Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

More State Funds Urged for Negro Banks

Monday, January 23, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This article reports about Operation Breadbasket's request for more funding from the State of Illinois to further its economic development efforts in the African American community.

Letter from Esther G. Stone to MLK

Sunday, January 21, 1968
Columbus, OH, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Esther G. Stone writes to Dr. King to express her opinions on Negro leadership, American politics, and the Vietnam War. Stone writes that President Lyndon Johnson has done so much for Negroes and that Mrs. Johnson did not deserve the hurtful remarks of Eartha Kitt.

Resurrection (Barth's View)

Dr. King quotes a passage from Hugh Mackintosh's "Types of Modern Theology" concerning Barth's views on resurrection.

Letter from Richard W. Boone

Saturday, October 29, 1966
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Memphis, TN, Chicago, IL, Cambridge, MA, New Orleans, LA, Texas (TX), Jackson, MS

The Child Development Group of Mississippi is being terminated by the Office of Economic Opportunity. This is not because the program isn't valid but because it would disturb the balance of politics in Mississippi. Klein and Saks, Inc. has helped keep the program alive. The goal of the program was to provide education, medical assistance, and nourishment for preschool children and their families.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. David Vetten

Thursday, April 4, 1968
New York, NY

The recipient of this letter is unknown, however, the Vetten family issued condolences for the murder of Dr. King. The Vettens acknowledged that Dr. Kng was a "hero of our nation."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Benjamin Hooks

Friday, November 11, 1966
Tennessee (TN)

In this letter Dr. King solicits the help of Mr. Hooks regarding allegations that SCLC associate Hosea Williams purchased stolen automobiles for SCLC. Dr. King asserts that the allegations should be investigated fully and enlists the aid of Benjamin Hooks, Chauncey Eskridge, and Joe Lowery.

Herbert Hill Statement Before the House Committee on Education and Labor

Friday, August 17, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, PUERTO RICO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Herbert Hill, National Labor Director for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, addresses the House Committee on Education and Labor regarding the questionable practices conducted by the leadership of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This telegram was sent from Benjamin Elijah Mays and his wife to Dr. King at the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia.

Evil

Dr. King references the religious philosopher William Ernest Hocking regarding the topic of evil.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Friday, August 9, 1963
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

Letter from Tore Lundby to MLK

Wednesday, January 13, 1965
NORWAY

Tore Lundby, editor, requests Dr. King to write an article on equality in America for a secondary school magazine.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Roy Wilkins, the chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urges Dr. King to attend a special meeting in Washington, D.C. to plan a course of action on pending civil rights legislation.

Relationship of State Units to the National Office

Virginia (VA), Nashville, TN

This document outlines the relationship between the national office of the SCLC and state level institutions, referred to as "State Units."

Negroes Hurl Rocks; Cops, Drivers Hurt

Michigan (MI), Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Missouri (MO), Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA), CANADA

An anonymous critic comments on a headline story that details a riot in Lansing, Michigan. Two additional reports are featured in the newspaper clipping including a short piece on Dr. King's visit to Jackson, Mississippi for a four day SCLC convention and a union convention in Kansas City, Missouri.

Letter from Werner Kelber to MLK

Wednesday, August 22, 1962
Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, GERMANY

German native and theological student Werner Kelber writes Dr. King expressing his discontent with the race relations in the Deep South. He compares the attitudes in the Deep South to those under Nazi Germany. Werner also explains that he would like to write his master's thesis on the movement and would value Dr. King's feedback.

Letter from Mary Grooms to Coretta Scott King

Friday, August 23, 1963
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Little Rock, AR, Memphis, TN

Mrs. Mary H. Grooms writes Mrs. Coretta Scott King expressing her support for Dr. King and the upcoming March on Washington. She also requests that Dr. King reach out to leaders in the North who have sought to emulate his methods.

Letter from MLK to Alyce Bledsoe

Monday, July 12, 1965
California (CA)

Dr. King thanks the Women's Auxiliary to the Charles R. Drew Medical Society for its contribution to the SCLC. The contribution will be used to send California students to assist in voter registration projects.

MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King examines the contradictions in human nature in this handwritten draft of a sermon.

Letter to Wallace Webster from MLK

Tuesday, December 29, 1964
Washington (WA)

Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Webster's invitation, but informs him that he has decided to commit more time to the civil rights struggle and is unable to accept.

Newspaper Article-New York TImes

Thursday, June 18, 1964
New York (NY)

This newspaper clipping is dated from the June 18, 1964 edition of the New York Times. In this article, Dr. King's new book entitled, "Why We Can't Wait" is advertised as "required reading."