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Letter from Richard Boone Enclosing CCAP Statement

This letter from the Executive Director of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty encloses a statement regarding the 1966 Amendments made to the Economic Opportunity Act.

Letter from Edward Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 18, 1966

Edward Kennedy thanks Dr. and Mrs. King for their hospitality during the Annual Convention of the SCLC.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Thursday, August 10, 1967

Co-Chairman Julian Bond welcomes Dr. King and other members of the SCLC to the National Conference for New Politics. Bond also comments on past civil rights victories, and he mentions future organizational directions.

MLK Flyer: "Integrated Bus Suggestions"

Wednesday, December 19, 1956

In this document, Dr. King and the Reverend W.J. Powell list under "The Montgomery Improvement Association" guidelines to mitigate potential conflicts in the transition to integrated buses. The principle of nonviolence is present throughout the document.

Letter from Richard Dobbins to SCLC

Thursday, August 11, 1966

The Fabulous Two Restaurant invites Coordinating Council of Community Organizations and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to a dinner on behalf of Dr. King.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to Dr. King regarding the 1968 election. He argues against Dr. King's picks for the best potential Republican and Democrat presidential candidates, saying that Vice President Humphrey would have a good chance at the White House if he were to publicly break with President Johnson over the Vietnam War.

Letter from Julius H. Avery to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966

Julius H. Avery notifies Dr. King that he will be in Atlanta for a conference at the Home Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention. Mr. Avery further requests that during his visit to the city, he and Dr. King arrange a meeting.

Letter from MLK to Laura R. Daly

Tuesday, April 19, 1966

Dr. King apologizes to Laura Daly for his delayed response and expresses his appreciation for her financial contribution. He states that the "new democracy" that has emerged in the south would not be possible without the moral and financial support from contributors such as Miss Daly. He discusses how there is still work to accomplish and the SCLC will continue their efforts in the freedom struggle.

Letter from Frank Elliot to MLK

Friday, January 18, 1963

This letter is discussing the manuscript and galley proofs that will be sent to Dr. King before his trip to the West Indies. Frank Elliot suggest to Dr. King to search for the references in the galley proof, since no foot notes will be provided. He also request that Dr.King proof read "Antidotes of Fear" and provide a preface if he has spare time to do so.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Nature and Thought

Dr. King summarizes views of Alfred North Whitehead in ?The Concept of Nature.?

Dr. King Sermon Rough Draft - "Man Incurably Religious"

The document, shown here, is a rough draft of sermon notes, prepared by Dr. King, under the title "Man Incurably Religious." The exact timeframe, of this sermon draft, is unknown. Dr. King, in this draft, puts the spotlight on examples such as a baby's attachment to a mother, a flower's direction toward the sun and the flight pattern of a pigeon. He used a quotation of St. Augustine that said, "We come forth from God and we shall be homesick until we return to him."

Speech at Chicago Freedom Movement Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1966

Dr. King speaks of the urgent need to address issues in the city such as deplorable housing conditions, discrimination in employment, segregation and overcrowded schools. He urges his listeners to commit to fill up the jails if necessary, register every eligible Negro to vote, withhold rent from slumlords, withdraw economic support from companies that don't hire Negroes, and support Negro-owned businesses. He stresses the importance of using nonviolent methods.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Frank Kuhlman about Support

In this letter Dr. King expresses his belated gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Kuhlman for their letter of support. Dr. King also comments on nonviolence and the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Leroy Benefield to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Mr. Benefield requests information on how Dr. King prepared his Old Testatment sermons.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Eugene Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addresses multiple issues that were misunderstood. He then encourages Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions and informs him that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

War

Citing two sources concerning war, Dr. King notes the opinions of Dr. Charles W. Mayo and John M. Fletcher. Dr. Mayo believes that it is impossible to abolish war, as "war is part of our human inheritance," while Fletcher takes the opposite view in his book "Human Nature and World Peace."

Letter from Nancy and Bill Brodie to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Nancy and Bill Brodie write Mrs. King to express their sympathy regarding Dr. King's assassination. As a method to comfort Mrs. King, Nancy includes a poem that she wrote for her father when he died.

Letter from Kendall Bryant to MLK

Sunday, October 27, 1963

A fourth grader from Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia writes Dr. King to inform him of a donation drive conducted by "Mrs. Magaziner's 4th grade class" for the rehabilitation of the 16th Street Baptist Church. The student requests a response letter from Dr. King to take back to the class.

Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church Concerns on Vietnam

Thursday, April 13, 1967

The Board of Christian Social Concerns are troubled by the events transpiring in Vietnam. They believe that such violence cannot be God's will and offer their solutions on how to end the war. They also applaud Dr. King for his views and words concerning the war.

Difference of the Transition Period from the Early Scientific Period

Dr. King references Alfred North Whitehead by noting the differences between the Transition Period and the Early Scientific Period.

Letter from Rita Machelle Foster to MLK

Wednesday, January 30, 1963

Rita Machelle Foster, an eighth grade student a Harvard Elementary School, requests any information or documentation provided by Dr. King for her composition on Negro History Week. Ms. Foster asks that Dr. King provide a photograph and discuss the James Meredith situation.

Letter from A. Bohdan to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

A. Bohdan, catering manager of Sydney, Australia's Chevron Hotel, writes Dr. King in request of his favorite meal to include on a special menu featuring dishes of other "famous personalities in Politics, Industry, and Art."

MLK's GRE Scores

Thursday, February 1, 1951

This report contains MLK's graduate record examination scores.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Mr. Virginia M. Burke

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Miss McDonald writes to Mr. Burke of the University of Wisconsin granting permission to quote Dr. King's historical "I Have a Dream" speech.

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

Letter from Indian Agency to Harper & Row

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this letter, the writer requests permission to translate Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" into Marahati, one of the regional languages in India. The author mentions that some of the social problems in India are similar problems "the Negro" faced in the United States.

MLK's Own Ticket to the SCLC Banquet

Friday, October 25, 1963

Sometimes you buy your own ticket to your own show!

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

SCLC Newsletter, July-August 1964

Wednesday, July 15, 1964

This 1964 SCLC newsletter addresses nearly all if not all topics related to the Civil Rights Movement of the era.