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"Tuskegee, AL"

Letter from President of Yugoslav Baptist Union to MLK

Tuesday, January 3, 1967

The President of the Yugoslav Baptist Union writes excitedly as he finds out Dr. King will be in his country. He requests that Dr. King stop by the church or his home during his short visit.

Mastering Ourselves

"Mastering Ourselves" is Dr. King's exploration of the inner struggle for good and evil that occurs within every human's experience. Dr. King asserts that this "dualism" can sometimes cause good people to do bad things and bad people to do good things. According to Dr. King, this can only be overcome through identifying and replacing one's own weaknesses. He also suggests finding a profitable way to use leisure time coupled with a devotional life and continuous prayer.

Letter from Alfred Gallen to MLK

A Chicago native writes to Dr. King concerning his current social and political affairs. He suggests that Dr. King should redirect his efforts to empower the black community rather than utilizing government assistance. He asserts that his presence and activities have ignited negative race relations.

Letter from Joseph Looney to MLK

Monday, November 14, 1966

Joseph Looney writes Dr. King inviting him to visit American College in Louvain, Belgium. Looney suggests the Reverend lead a discussion regarding the developments in the Civil Rights struggle and his role in it. Looney closes by praying that God will bless Dr. King and his family.

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

Southern Rural Action Project

Saturday, April 1, 1967

The Southern Rural Action Project, an initiative of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, seeks to finance and support community development in low-income areas. This progress report highlights current field projects and objectives.

A Message from Jail

Saturday, July 21, 1962

After being arrested and charged with parading without a license, Dr. King wrote a column from jail. The column shared his and Ralph David Abernathy's decision to serve the jail sentence instead of paying a fine of $178.

Letter from Vivian Cintron to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Vivian Cintron, who is a student, offers her condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Paul Verghese to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1966

Father Verghese requests Dr. King provide a written statement regarding what spiritual resources he draws upon, to cope with the constant threat from elements of American Society, and how he uses this as a basis for his position on nonviolence.

Fichte on God

Dr. King references Kantian protege Johann Gottlieb Fichte and philosophically defines God as the "moral order of the universe."

Telegram from the James A. Bailey Family to MLK

Monday, September 22, 1958

The James A. Bailey family offers its prayers for Dr. King's recovery.

Letter from Stanley Newman to MLK Regarding National Coalition for a New Congress

Newman writes that, given the recent passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Bill, a national coalition needs to be created to support and enforce it. Understanding the limitations of Congress, the new coalition would focus on transforming Congress to better support the needs of the underprivileged and oppressed.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Goucher College

Friday, June 26, 1964

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's delight in knowing that Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Coucher College will include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on their school's reading list. She urges Dean Dorsey to purchase Dr. King's recent book "Why We Can't Wait," which contains the full text of the letter.

Letter from James W. Ealey to MLK

Friday, June 21, 1963

The Baptist Minister's conference of Richmond and vicinity writes Dr. King, enclosing a contribution of $367.20 for the expenses incurred in the Birmingham struggle.

Religion

Dr. King writes that religion is paradoxical.

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Letter from Agatha G. Horn to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

Agatha Horn, the Worthy Grand Matron (presiding officer) of the Eureka, Illinois Grand Chapter of the Order of the Eastern Star, a Freemasonry affiliate, sends Dr. King a contribution and expresses how he has proven himself to be a man of integrity, courage and humility.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King summarizes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "Can God Be Perceived" that appeared in The Journal of Religion (1943).

Letter from Thomas Hirst to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1966

Thomas E. Hirst re-extends Dr. King an invitation for a speaking engagement at the Law School Forum of the University of Alberta. The Law School Forum publicly presents many intellectuals to present to their audience and provide community service. Mr. Hirst asserts that Canada serves as a neighbor to the United States and is concerned with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter to MLK from Raymond Brown

Sunday, December 10, 1967

Raymond Brown writes to Dr. King admonishing him for his affiliations with Adam Clayton Powell and Stokely Carmichael and hopes that these associations are temporary.

Letter from Robert Gabor to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963

Robert Gabor writes Dr. King inviting him to Oslo, Norway to speak at the 7th International Congress of the International Union of Socialist Youth. Gabor expresses to Dr. King that their organization supports "the present struggle of the American Negro."

Invitation from Southern Methodist University to MLK

Wednesday, August 4, 1965

Bert Moore invites Dr. King to be the guest lecturer at Southern Methodist University. He says that their organization has participated in demonstration and has raised awareness in their community. He also says that next year will be an important year for their school and for Dallas as a whole, and they need a man of Dr. King's stature to come.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Dr. Kings thanks Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton for her and Mr. James Peterson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Communism

Dr. King quotes a statement from Jacques Maritain's "True Harmonism" regarding communism. Jacques Maritain was a famous French Catholic philosopher.

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

A Manual for Direct Action

In this foreword Bayard Rustin provides an introduction into the rules and tips involved in nonviolent action concerning protests. Mr. Rustin describes nonviolent methods that people can use when encountering dangerous or difficult situations.

SCLC Newsletter

Sunday, August 27, 1967

This SCLC Newsletter discusses topics such as anti-Semitism, progress in various parts of the country, and Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Herbert J. Kramer to John W. Bloomer

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Herbert J. Kramer informs the managing editor of Birmingham News, about "America's New Commitment" and the "Plowshare Pledge."

Statement by Reverend Jesse Jackson

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Reverend Jesse Jackson gives a report regarding SCLC's Operation Breadbasket. Reverend Jackson states, "There are no riotous fires set aflame in this country that can be put out with water from a rubber hose; the flames must be extinguished by money from an economic hose."