Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Tuskegee, AL"

Letter from Rosa Lockett Reodus to MLK

Sunday, January 30, 1966

Reodus invites Dr. King to speak at the Progressive Community Church in Chicago and offers a small donation from the church in support of his cause.

"Question of Credibility"

Sunday, October 16, 1966

In this article, the author highlights and questions the credibility of The Child Development Group, which was created to assist in educating the youth of Mississippi.

Reception Honoring Ambassadors of the Organization of African Unity

In 1966, while President Lyndon B. Johnson was in office, Dr. King received this invitation to a reception at the White House. The reception honored Ambassadors of the Organization of African Unity States.

SANE Action: Citizens' Milk Strike

Friday, February 16, 1962

As an economic act against pollution and a nuclear war, the National Committee For A SANE Nuclear Policy stages a Citizens' Milk Strike.

The Uniqueness of Jesus

Dr. King reflects on the virgin birth of Jesus and how this attribute was used to contextualize his "uniqueness." This reflection later appeared in his essay entitled "What Experiences of Christians Living in the Early Christian Century Led to the Christian Doctrines of the Divine Sonship of Jesus, the Virgin Birth, and the Bodily Resurrection" that he completed during his time at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from Percival Ennis to MLK

Percival Ennis, president of the Universal Negro Improvement Association in British Honduras, asks Dr. King if he is able to visit British Honduras and speak to his organization.

Letter from Ann & John Flynn

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

In this letter, Ann Flynn requests a copy of the text of Dr. King's speech made at Riverside Church.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

"Delaware Hears Nixon Fight Bias"

Friday, October 1, 1954

This New York Times article provides details about Vice President Richard Nixon's decision to support the end of school segregation.

Letter from Gus Zucco to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, October 16, 1962

Gus Zucco, Director of Public Information for Cedar Crest College, writes Dora McDonald stating, "we are withholding any further announcement regarding Dr. King's visit with us" in hopes that he could reschedule.

Letter from Jerome Karlin to MLK

Wednesday, November 28, 1962

Jerome B. Karlin expresses his admiration for Dr. King's dedication to the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Karlin highlights the importance of Dr. King's ideals and the continuation of the fight for social justice.

Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?

Saturday, December 17, 1966

Dr. King outlines the ten chapters of his book "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

SCLC 10th Anniversary Flyer

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

The flyer highlights the 10th anniversary of the SCLC and outlines the speakers and events which will take place.

Telegram from A Philip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

Mr. A. Philip Randolph offers his brotherhood and support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Jefferson County jail.

Letter from MLK to Adolf Kriess

Friday, December 7, 1962

Dr. King sends a note of thanks to Mr. Kriess for a poem he sent.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Letter from R. Terry Taft to MLK

Monday, March 19, 1962

R. Terry Taft expresses his disappointment in reading Dr. King's feelings in Newsweek regarding the failure of the Office of Urban affairs to become a federal cabinet position.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This is the Lincoln Memorial program for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Notable leaders including Dr. King, Walter Reuther, and Whitney M. Young, Jr., will make remarks at the march. Also included is a list of demands, a joint statement from ten organizations and a map.

Call to Action in Race Relations

Sunday, January 1, 1961

J. Oscar Lee and S. Garry Oniki draft a memorandum to outline the purpose, function and program emphases for the General Committee for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations sponsored by the National Council of Churches.

Abelard

Dr. King quotes 12th century French philosopher Peter Abelard on the relationship between doubt, inquiry and truth.

Letter from Congressman Lionel Van Deerlin to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965

Congressman Lionel Van Deerlin, the 37th district Representative from California, thanks Dr. King for the telegram urging him to sign the discharge petition for the home rule bill for the District of Columbia, and he lets Dr. King know he has already signed it.

Chicago Urban League Golden Fellowship Dinner and Dance

The Chicago Urban League coaxes members and invitees to their Golden Fellowship Dinner and Dance with a night of privilege and a chance to win a 1967 Pontiac.

Letter from MLK to May Edward Chinn

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King responds to Dr. May Chinn's letter of support and encouragement. King states, "Our struggle for freedom is often difficult and the moments are often frustrating, but we gain new courage to carry on..."

Letter from MLK to Irene Shunfenthal

Dr. King thanks Irene Shunfenthal for her support. He says that those who seek peace through nonviolence must use every creative means of protest available to achieve U.S. disengagement from Vietnam, and must also urge that nonviolence be adopted internationally to settle disputes among nations.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa writes an uplifting message to General Yakubu Gowon of Lagos, Nigeria. They extend a "hand in friendship" to bring the war in Nigeria to an end.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

The Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Commission on Community Activity and Organization lists various members from different organizations.

Letter from Charles Johnson to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Charles Johnson offers suggestions to Dr. King about job creation following the violent riots that took place in the summer of 1967. He proposes that the federal government intervene and allow younger potential workers to enter into the job force and retire those who have been employed a long time. According to Johnson, employing these young workers will eliminate the uprisings seen in various urban cities around the United States.

Telegram from Congressman Seymour Halpern to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965

In this telegram to Dr. King in Selma jail, Congressman Seymour Halpern expresses his regret that he is unable to travel to Mississippi.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Inquiring about Dr.King's Professional Tour

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Mrs.Daves has requested that Mrs.McDonald send information pertaining to Dr.King's lectures and personal appearances to her office as soon as possible.

Program From MLK's Nobel Peace Prize Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

This is the program from a Recognition Dinner honoring Dr. King sponsored by the Citizens of Atlanta following his winning the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. It took place at the Dinkler Plaza Hotel and included an address by Dr. King.