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Anonymous Letter to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

An individual finds it insulting that Dr. King is compared to Abraham Lincoln and would like Dr. King to be remembered as a traitor.

Looking Forward: The Montgomery Improvement Association, Inc.

Montgomery, AL

This pamphlet outlines the ten points the Montgomery Improvement Association uses to promote healthy race relations.

Letter from High School Student Elizabeth L. Andrews to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963
Pittsburgh, PA

Elizabeth Andrews, a sophomore at North Hills High School, requests Dr. King's autograph for her class letter writing project.

The Catholic Review: Letter From Birmingham Jail

Friday, July 19, 1963
Baltimore, MD, Birmingham, AL, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), Maryland (MD), Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" is printed in this publication along with articles and columns illustrating the Church's civil rights activities. Efforts included priests taking part in direct action to integrate an amusement park and an archbishop backing the civil rights bill.

Letter from V. K. Krishna Menon to MLK

Monday, September 5, 1966
VIETNAM, Geneva, Switzerland, SWITZERLAND, INDIA, New Delhi, India

V. K. Krishna Menon informs Dr. King of the upcoming International Conference Against War Danger, which has the support of more than 70 countries. He requests that Dr. King contribute a paper about racism to the conference, and he also invites Dr. King to attend the event.

Rabbi Heschel on the War on Vietnam

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rabbi Abraham Heschel, civil rights advocate and associate of Dr. King, writes on the ethical corruption created by the Vietnam War. Calling the war an example of "extreme absurdity" that has been "nurtured on stereotypes," Rabbi Heschel encourages American citizens to recognize the demoralization of the war and take action against it.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles Merrill

Wednesday, October 4, 1967
Boston, MA

Dora McDonald replies to Merrill's request that Dr. King nominate nonviolent activist Danilo Dolci for the Nobel Peace Prize. Known as the Sicilian Gandhi, Dolci opposed poverty, social exclusion and the Mafia. Merrill was chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College and King's personal friend.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLk

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York, NY

In this document, Dr. King's literary agent, Joan Daves, forwards a royalty statement, for the French editions of Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Strength to Love."

Poems Entitled "Black Power," "Beyond Anger," and "Sins Of The Father"

In this document, there are three poems: "Black Power", "Beyond Anger" and "Sins Of The Father".

Francis A. O'Connell Letter to Mr. Steve Klein and MLK

Monday, September 25, 1978
Washington, D.C.

Francis A. O' Connell provides Steve Klein with the requested copies of the speech delivered at the Transport Workers Union 11th Constitutional Convention.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Dr. King praises President John F. Kennedy for his eloquent appeal for freedom and justice and says the President's message will become "a hallmark in the annals of American history" if his proposed legislation is passed.

Letter from Charles S. Joelson to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Congressman Joelson of New Jersey responds to Dr. King's recent letter urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. He informs Dr. King that he shares his view and was one of the 148 members who voted against it.

Letter from Verinal Harris to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. Verinal Harris pleads for the help of Dr. King regarding the brutal actions of the police against children in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Letter from John C. Hall to MLK about a March

Thursday, February 8, 1968
Washington, D.C.

In this letter John C. Hall informs Dr. King of his desire to participate in the upcoming march to Washington D.C. and requests any information regarding such.

MLK Handwritten Notes

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding 'Love' and uses Reinhold Niebuhr as a reference.

Notecard regarding freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's views on freedom, according to the book, "Human Nature and Conduct." This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Credit

Saturday, September 1, 1962

This poem examines a man's earthly worth and finally his heavenly worth.

Anonymous Adverse Letter to MLK

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

The author of this letter sends Dr. King a strong message to leave Chicago. According to the sender, Dr. King does nothing but "cause trouble from one place to another."

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL)

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora MacDonald

Tuesday, May 12, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves informs Dora MacDonald of the details for Dr. King's appearances on the Today Show, the Martha Dean Show, a Press Conference and a Channel 13 interview.

Brutality in Mississippi

Jackson, MS, Chicago, IL, Maryland (MD), North Carolina (NC)

This document contains two articles that reference CORE worker Scott B. Smith. Disclosing accounts of Smith's experiences in Mississippi, the articles emphasize racially charged brutality as a common occurrence.

Fort Valley State College Vesper Program

Sunday, October 23, 1955
Fort Valley, GA, Georgia (GA)

This program outlines the events of a service held at Fort Valley State College in Georgia and notes Dr. King as the keynote speaker.

Letter from MLK to William A. Rutherford

Wednesday, November 23, 1966
SWITZERLAND, Chicago, IL

Dr. King encourages Mr. Rutherford that he would be a great asset to the S.C.L.C. and the Civil Rights Movement.

Note Regarding Boycotting Olympic Game

This is a brief handwritten note of appreciation for encouraging the boycott of the Olympic Games.

Letter from Miss D. McDonald to The Rev. Julian J. Keiser

Monday, June 22, 1964
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), Los Angeles, CA

Miss McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, assures Reverend Keiser that Dr. King's recent trip to Los Angeles was a pleasnt experience. Miss McDonald conveys Dr. King's hope that his "appearance, in some way, proved helpful."

We Would See Jesus

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King summarizes a biblical passage from the Book of John, in which he describes "inquiring Greeks" from a rich heritage who came to Philip and made the simple request, "sir, we would see Jesus." These words are also the title of one of Dr. King's sermons delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Letter from Rabbi Gerald A. Goldman to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968
New York (NY)

Rabbi Gerald A. Goldman invites Dr. King to be a guest at the West Side Peace Committee Conference.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Sunday, March 11, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King congratulate Reverend Ralph Abernathy on his birthday.

Letter from Christopher Pearce to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL

Mr. Pearce, a young English filmmaker, desiring to produce a documentary on Dr. King, requests permission to follow him about Washington, D. C. during his upcoming visit.