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"UGANDA"

Letter from Minnie Summers Lindsey to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

Mrs. Lindsey asks Dr. King for a copy of a speech she recently heard on the radio and his "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Boston Sunday Herald: Martin King Discusses. . .

Sunday, May 7, 1967

In Boston Sunday Herald article, Dr. King shares his views on mayoral candidate Mrs. Louise Day Hicks, Senator Edward Brooke, and the President's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King is adamant enough on the latter issue that he remarks he may change his policy regarding neutrality in elections.

Letter from Terry J. Fox to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

This letter, was written to Dr. King from Terry J. Fox. Terry J. Fox is the President of Iroquois Industries Inc. In this letter he attaches to Dr. King a copy of his company brochure.

Letter Dated 12/7/62 from MLK's Secretary to Mel Arnold

Friday, December 7, 1962

In this correspondence to Mr. Mel Arnold, Miss. Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, sent a enclosure of the sermon entitled "Broken Dreams."

Telegram to MLK from Various Organizational Leaders

Monday, June 19, 1967

Several organizational leaders request that Dr. King join them in Washington, D.C. for an event in which Ambassador Galbraith will address a luncheon with a "major statement on Vietnam."

Letter from Sam Gasbarre to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967

Sam Gasbarre, identifying himself as a white American, writes Dr. King to support his opinion that the Vietnam War is evil and should end.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding Roosevelt Day Address on "Peace"

Friday, January 25, 1952

Here in this notecard, Dr. King provides a quote from the Roosevelt Day address concerning peace, on January 25, 1952.

Letter from Jessie Jackson to C. L. Franklin

Tuesday, February 21, 1967

Reverend Jessie Jackson writes this letter to Reverend C. L. Franklin of the New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Jackson expresses his gratitude for Franklin's suggestions and assistance during a recent stay in Detroit. He also appreciates the solidarity exhibited towards the SCLC.

Stanford University Faculty and Staff Pledge of Civil Disobedience

Friday, May 26, 1967

The Faculty and Staff members of Stanford University make a pledge of civil disobedience to protest the Vietnam conflict. The individuals signing the pledge request members of the clergy and academic community with like sentiments to join them in this demonstration.

Letter From Clifford Alexander Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, June 28, 1967

Clifford Alexander Jr. thanks Dr. King for supporting him in his nomination as Chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Contribution Letter to MLK

Monday, August 1, 1966

A Department of State Agency for International Development summer intern expresses his support for SCLC. He offers a small contribution to the Atlanta-based foundation.

Invoice-"Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 16, 1967

Harper & Row, Publishers issued this invoice to Dr. King, for the shipment of six copies of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from MLK to Gaynette Henderson

Monday, November 2, 1964

Dr. King regretfully informs Gaynette Henderson that he will be unable to visit the sorority suite of Delta Sigma Theta during his visit to Pennsylvania State University.

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King summarizes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "Can God Be Perceived" that appeared in The Journal of Religion (1943).

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

Metaphysic[s]

Dr. King quotes William James’ “The Sentiment of Rationality” on Arthur Schopenhauer’s view of metaphysics.

Response Letter to Mr. Frank Abrams from Dr. King

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King addressed this letter to Mr. Frank Abrams, as an expression of thanks, in response for his well wishes. As a another gesture of thanks, Dr. King indicated that he also enclosed a copy of his first book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1963

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, informs Dr. King that his department is inquiring into events in Greenwood, Mississippi that Dr. King brought to his attention. He assures Dr. King that the Justice Department will take appropriate action with respect to any violations of federal law.

Letter from Kathy Boudin to MLK

Thursday, September 5, 1963

Conference Coordinator Kathy Boudin invites Dr. King to participate in a three-day conference held by the students of Bryn Mawr and Haverford Colleges.

Letter from Mayor El-Khatib of Jerusalem to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967

Rouhi El-Khatib, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Jordan, welcomes Dr. King to the city in advance of a pilgrimage planned for November 1967. At the time of this letter, East Jerusalem was part of Jordan and West Jerusalem was Israeli territory. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

Letter to Jesse Jackson from Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 30, 1966

Dr. King request the attendance of Rev. Jesse Jackson at a meeting that will discuss the distribution of grant funds for a program regarding nonviolence and social change.

Speeches by the Leaders

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

Ex-West Sider

The author discusses their experiences with living in substandard housing in a low socioeconomic environment. The author also questions the racial focus of Chicago's appeasement to the Negro.

Hruska Says Capital...

Nebraska Senator Roman Hruska criticizes the Dr. King-led demonstrations and asserts that the government does not really know what the demonstrator's goals are.

Letter from Joan Daves to Mrs. Dora McDonald about expenses from trip to New York

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Dr. and Mrs. King extended their stay in New York City to launch his latest book. Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting lodging receipts in an effort to expedite the expense reporting process with Harper Publishing. Handwritten notes on the document suggest that the launch was very successful.

Helping Across the South

Operation Freedom is an organization that originally began in west Tennessee to aid African Americans that were wrongly evicted from their homes due to the white power structure. The committees of Operation Freedom have expanded to other southern states where their help is needed.

Letter from MLK to Moreland Griffith Smith, Sr.

Tuesday, February 23, 1965

Dr. King thanks Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee to the US Commission Civil Rights, in advance for advising him at the upcoming meeting. Dr. King states that he is sending Reverend Andrew Young to represent the SCLC.

Royalty Statement-MLK

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Dr. King receives a royalty statement for the sale of the Norwegian edition of "Stength to Love." The Norwegian edition was published by De Unge Forlag and sold 6963 copies. The total for the statement amounts to $1139.15.

Kant Critiques Other Philosophers

Dr. King contemplates Immanuel Kant's critique of other philosophers. Kant finds limitations in the ideologies of Hume, Leibniz, and Locke. He believes Hume and Leibniz to fall short on their understandings of knowledge. Kant further reproaches Hume and Locke as ignorant for viewing the senses as a viable explanation of consciousness.

God

Dr. King references the book of Job by discussing the immense and power of God.