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Judgement or Justice

Dr. King quotes a book entitled "Sea Dreams," by Alfred Lord Tennyson, regarding judgement and justice.

Letter from J. Campe to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"and "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, March 6, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter is enclosed a check and details of expenses for the Italian Edition of "Stride Toward Freedom and "Why We Can't Wait".

Knowledge of God

Dr. King quotes a segment of Professor John Baille's work regarding self-consciousness and God.

Northern District of Mississippi Court Order

Tuesday, November 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

District Court Judge Claude F. Clayton for Mississippi, issues an order sustaining part of the motion for supplemental relief on behalf of minor plaintiffs, Sharper T. Cunningham and Darlene Cunningham vs. Grenada Municipal Separate School District of Mississippi.

Letter from M. Carl Holman Regarding Equal Education Opportunity Conference

Thursday, November 9, 1967
Washington, D.C.

M. Carl Holman, the Director of the Equal Educational Opportunity in America's Cities, a conference of the United States Commission on Civil Rights, writes to the conference partic-ipants, Dr. King included. Carl Holman writes that this conference was specifically requested by President Johnson following the Commission's report on racial isolation in public schools.

Telegram from Marvin Rich to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966
South Carolina (SC), New York, NY, New York (NY)

Marvin Rich informs Dr. King of a resolution that was adopted at a recent conference. The resolution called for a summit of civil rights leaders.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Georgia (GA), VIETNAM, New Hampshire (NH), Wisconsin (WI)

This was sent to Dr. King from Abram Eisenman, who is running for President of the United States in 1968. He asks for Dr. King's support in running for president and presents his case on why he should be president.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Friday, June 15, 1962
New York (NY)

New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller writes Dr. King to tell him how much of a "privilege" it was to see him and meet Mrs. King at the Spelman College luncheon. He alludes to "tragic circumstances" surrounding his visit, but nonetheless conveys appreciation for the opportunity to be in attendance and meet with those working "for the cause of better understanding."

Letter from Harry C. Meserve to Dr. King

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Michigan (MI)

Mr. Meserve of the Michigan Human Relation Council thanks Dr. King for his address to the organization. Additionally he apologizes for the disturbance of the "Nazis" during his visit.

Sin

Dr. King cites a quote from Reinhold Niebuhr regarding sin.

Letter of Condolence to Mrs. King from Deborah Easton

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter of condolence was composed the day after Dr. King's assassination by a young student, Deborah Easton.

Tidewater Youth Association Invites MLK to Speak

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Virginia (VA)

Edwin Crocker, president of the Tidewater Youth Association, Inc. in Portsmouth, Virginia informs Dr. King of an interest to present him as their forum speaker. A student initiative, the organization strives to improve social, economic, and spiritual conditions of the Negro. The group hopes Dr. King will consider helping the youth fight for racial justice and equality.

Beyond Condemnation

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Beyond Condemnation." He references the biblical story about a woman condemned to death by the Pharisees for adultery. Jesus commands "the person without sin to cast the first stone" as a lesson that all sins are equal and that no one should judge the flaws of others.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963
Texas (TX), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Statement by Dr. Robert W. Spike on the Mississippi Seating Challenge

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Reverend Dr. Robert W. Spike writes a statement concerning a plan to dismiss a seating challenge in the U.S. House of Representatives. Reverend Spikes discusses the political inadequacies concerning the denial of the Mississippi residents right to vote. Following the seating of the delegation, an investigation commenced to ensure the political legitimacy.

Isaiah

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Isaiah regarding topics like ritual sacrifice, knowledge, social ethics, and the doctrine of man.

Man

ISRAEL

Dr. King writes about man, as discussed in the Old Testament passages, Hosea 10: 13 and 14.

Black Marches and White Hysteria

Monday, August 15, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This editorial by WBBM-TV in Chicago, a CBS station, highlights recent civil rights marches and the corresponding white hysteria. Carter Davidson, editorial director, discusses the marches and the middle-class citizens who displayed Nazi swastikas in response.

Holiday Greetings to You and Yours!

Frances Pauley inquires about the "white Santa Claus" and seeks the day when all children are equal.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

In support of the Albany Movement, the Albany Manifesto was drafted to make clear what the proponents of the cause sought to resolve.

MLK's Final Exam for Social Philosophy

Monday, May 28, 1962

Dr. King's final exam for the Seminar in Social Philosophy class he taught at Morehouse College from 1961-1962.

Telegram to MLK from the Dogwood Tree

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King receives a telegram of support from "The Dogwood Tree." The telegram conveys that "the orthodox Jewish religion is working for you. Keep your faith...."

Cardinal Virtues

Dr. King defines "cardinal virtues" and then lists those held by the Greeks and Christians.

Letter from "A Southerner" to MLK

This letter, signed by, "A Southerner", suggests that Dr. King persuade Black people to return to Africa.

MLK Speaker's Contract

Monday, April 3, 1967
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Wisconsin (WI)

This Speakers Bureau Contract states that Dr. King has a speaking engagement on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin.

Annual Report of The President: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Chicago, IL, Jackson, MS, North Carolina (NC), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In the SCLC's Annual Presidential Report, Dr. King chronicles a decade of organization's activities to eliminate segregation. The report was delivered at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC.

Worship

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from James Bissett Pratt's "Religious Consciousness," which focuses on the purpose of the Protestant sermon. Dr. King expands Pratt's analysis to encompass the entire Protestant service.

Letter from William J. Connor to MLK

Saturday, December 2, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King was the recipient of the correspondence from Mr. William J. Connor of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Mr. Connor was honored to extend a contribution to the civil rights movement. He went on to extend courtesies to Dr. King's family and Rev. Abernathy.

Transcript of National Educational Television's For Freedom Now

Tuesday, July 23, 1963
Chicago, IL, Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL), New York, NY, New York (NY), Ohio (OH), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), CUBA, HUNGARY

For Freedom Now, with host Dr. Kenneth Clark, is television’s first exchange of ideas by the leaders of five organizations engaged in securing full civil rights for Negroes. Featured guests are Dr. King of SCLC, Whitney Young of the National Urban League, James Farmer of CORE, James Forman of SNCC, and Roy Wilkins of the NAACP.

Letter From Ms. Gretchen Johnston to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
North Carolina (NC), Washington, D.C.

Gretchen Johnston, a Caucasian Quaker, expresses her support and gratitude to Dr. King regarding the employment of women, integration of schools, and awarding of the Nobel Peace Prize.