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Anonymous Sender Criticizes MLK

This anonymous writer challenges Dr. King with his complaints concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He argues that a Negro man should be held responsible for breaking the law and should expect rightful punishment.

WBBM-TV: Ban Further Marches

Tuesday, August 16, 1966

This report by WBBM-TV of Chicago states that 60% of their feedback panelists would prefer the banning of further civil rights marches to reduce racial tension. Other questions posed include the perceived appropriate police response, the effect on neighborhoods, and Dr. King's influence in Chicago.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Edward A. Jones

Tuesday, April 9, 1963

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Edward Jones of Morehouse College, asking him to translate the enclosed letter for Dr. King.

War in Vietnam Must Be Ended

Friday, December 31, 1965

Marriner S. Eccles, a banker and former governor of the Federal Reserve System, urges an end to the Vietnam War, saying the U.S. is violating international law and has taken over the war to fight communism in Vietnam. He believes the billions spent on war would be more effective in preventing the spread of communism if spent on eliminating poverty and illiteracy in the developing countries.

Letter from Betty D. Richardson to MLK

Wednesday, February 22, 1967

Betty Richardson reminds Dr. King of his speaking engagement for the American Friends Service Committee 50th Anniversary Dinner.

Letter from Adlai E. Stevenson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

US Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai Stevenson, informs Dr. King that they will have to postpone their meeting due to a U.N. Security Council meeting that Mr. Stevenson has to preside over.

Memo from Barbara Moffett to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Barbara W. Moffett writes a memorandum to Dr. King and Harry Wachtel, commenting on a second draft statement submitted by the American Friends Service Committee to the SCLC. Ms. Moffett also sends a copy of the memo with a handwritten note to Andy Young.

Telegram from Wyatt Tee Walker

Saturday, July 28, 1962

Walker sends out this telegram to inform its recipients that Dr. King and Rev. Abernathy have been unjustly arrested in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from MLK to Harry Wachtel, Esq.

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

Dr. King updates Attorney Harry Wachtel about a nonviolence workshop that took place at the Penn Center in Frogmore, South Carolina.

Problems of Whitehead

Dr. King discusses the problem of metaphysical dualism as presented by philosopher Alfred North Whitehead. Dr. King reviewed much of Whitehead's work while at Boston University and later quoted him in his Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech.

Letter from MLK to Clifford Joesph

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mr. Joseph for donating Christmas cards to the SCLC.

Telegram from Planned Parenthood to MLK

Saturday, June 11, 1966

Medora Bass, Planned Parenthood President, asks Dr. King for a response to an invitation to speak at the organization's upcoming annual luncheon.

Letter from Margaret & Richard Dodge to MLK

Sunday, March 21, 1965

Margaret and Richard Dodge inform Dr. King of a successful fundraiser they hosted and enclose the profits to help Dr. King in the civil rights movement.

Self-World

Dr. King paraphrases Paul Tillich's view on the "self world polarity." Being a self, Dr. King writes, means being "both subject and object." This subject matter later appeared in Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from James A. Dombrowski Regarding S.C.E.F. Contribution

In this document, James A. Dombrowski, the Executive Director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. requests a $10.00 contribution.

Letter from MLK to James K. Shipman

Friday, November 17, 1967

Dr. King thanks James Shipman, Chairman of the Organization Committee of the Ohio Association of Community-Junior Colleges, for an invitation to speak at Cuyahog Community College. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to schedule demands related to planning for the first four months of 1968.

Letter from MLK to Professor William Goldsmith

Thursday, October 17, 1963

Dr. King sends his appreciation to Professor William Goldsmith for the contribution made by the students and faculty of Brandeis University to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Bifurcation of Nature

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead's views on the bifurcation of nature into apparent and causal nature in "The Concept of Nature."

Declaration of the World Council of Peace on Vietnam

Monday, February 12, 1968

The World Council of Peace issued this press release declaring their position against the Vietnam War. They state that they are pro-peace and against American oppression and that President Johnson is ignoring their peace proposals.

Letter from Curtis W. Harris to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

Curtis W. Harris demands that the United States Justice Department intervene in Virginia's school systems to prevent discrimination in how tax funds are used for public education. Mr. Harris reports that Negroes continue to be excluded from serving on local school boards and this exclusion "constitutes discrimination and is a violation of Federal law."

Letter From MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Dr. King regrets to inform some of the SCLC staff that they will have to cut back to their "normal capacity", while thanking them for their contribution to the organization.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

Wall Street Journal: Letter to Editor from J. Chico Ramos

Monday, July 22, 1963

Mexican- American J. Chico Ramos gives his opinion to the Editor of The Wall Street Journal on racial issues in America. He objects to the claims that the Civil Rights Movement is going to help all minorities, because while they may benefit negroes, he doesn't feel they have ever benefitted anyone of his own nationality.

Reservation for Official Inaugural Book

This is the reservation form for the 1965 Official Inaugural Book in honor of Lyndon Baines Johnson and Hubert Horatio Humphrey.

Slum Building Seized

This article includes multiple viewpoints regarding Dr. King and the seizure of a slum building in Chicago.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to Mr. T. M. Alexander, Jr.

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

Mr. Rutherford writes Mr. Alexander explaining that members of the SCLC were not aware of the purchase of stock made on behalf of the organization. He explains to Mr. Alexander that the organization is in complaint of and will protest Mr. Alexander's actions.

Letter from Reverend V. W. Glanton to MLK

Monday, February 6, 1967

Reverend V. W. Glanton encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC after receiving communications about voter registration initiatives in the South.

Letter from Frank Van Leemput to MLK

Saturday, December 30, 1967

Frank Ban Leemput, a high school student from Belgium, requests Dr. King provide signatures for the enclosed photos. Mr. Leemput is creating a biography of Dr. King and is in admiration of his political activism as well as achievements in the field of desegregation.

Letter from Emily Barton Arrabee to MLK

Sunday, January 20, 1963

Ms. Arrabee sends a check to Dr. King not for the SCLC, but for Dr. and Mrs. King to use to treat themselves in some way. Arrabee suggests a book, a new record or dinner together. The check is a token of her respect and admiration for both Dr. and Mrs. King.

Letter from Edwin Fenton to MLK about permission to use Marchi on Washington speech

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Edward Fenton, Co-Director, Social Studies Curriculum Development Center at Carnegie Institute of Technology writes to request permission to duplicate some excerpts from Dr.King's speech in Washington during the summer of 1963 without fee. Operating under a grant from the United States Office of Education, the Center is developing new courses of study and writing materials to teach social studies inductively to able students in grades nine through twelve.