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"UGANDA"

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from Beth Arnold to MLK

Ms. Arnold writes to inform Dr. King that she is head of his campaign committee for a campus movement for the upcoming election. She asks for any campaign material Dr. King can provide.

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.

Letter from MLK to Franklin D. Roosevelt III about Contribution

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Mr. Roosevelt regarding a contribution he made to the SCLC.

Memo from S. Leiss to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965

S. Leiss encloses payment from Gakashu Kenkju Sha for a Japanese-language digest of "Why We Can't Wait" that was published in "Fair Lady."

Worship

Dr. King notes some attributes and results of worship.

Draft of Dedication Page for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a rough draft of the dedication page of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait;" the draft reveals Dr. King's wish for his children.

Biography of MLK

Margaret B. Young details the events and accomplishments of Dr. King's life.

People In Action : "Birmingham Part 2"

Saturday, August 17, 1963

Dr. King, along with the SCLC, devises a plan to stop government officials from shutting down public facilities. Dr. King goes on to discuss the racism in Albany and plans to generate peace with the white communities.

Letter From Carl H. Pforzheimer to MLK

Friday, June 30, 1967

Mr. Pforzheimer expresses his appreciation for an inscribed copy of one of Dr. King's books.

Letter from Aileen B. Armstrong to MLK

Saturday, May 18, 1963

Mrs. Armstrong writes Dr. King to express her regard and deep appreciation for his work.

Letter from James Hamilton and Frank Pohlhaus

Friday, March 31, 1967

James Hamilton and Francis Pohlhaus offer the Leadership Conference Executive Committee a list of recommendations on school desegregation. They also provide information on reasons why goals toward equal education have not been progressing as needed.

Draft Letter from MLK Regarding Grand Freedom March

Dr. King addresses his "Brother-In-Christ" requesting assistance for an up and coming March for Freedom held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He makes three requests including financial and social support.

Letter from Melvin Kennedy to Mr. Ralph Helstein Recommending a Student Scholarship

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Melvin Kennedy, Chairman of the Department of History at Morehouse College, recommends a student for a United Packinghouse Scholarship.

Recommendation Letter for Mrs. Lillie Hunter from MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966

Dr. King drafts a letter of recommendation for a former employee, Lillie Hunter.

Letter from Anne Jewett to MLK

In this letter dated May 5, 1967, Jewett informs King of her song. Let There Be Peace. Jewett believes that this simple song is what churches and peace marchers need, so that they can be heard. She has given the song to King in hopes that the people everywhere will be able to sing out.

Letter from Rose Auguste to MLK

Rose Auguste asks Dr. King for a list of publishers that are open to Negro work. She is looking for a publisher for her manuscript, which has a "spiritual and supernatural theme."

Letter from Adie Marks to Harry Belafonte

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Adie Marks writes Harry Belafonte in an effort to organize an event consisting of several artists and organizations to combat issues African Americans face in America.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays

Thursday, December 19, 1963

In this letter to Dr. Mays, Dr. King mentions a letter of recommendation written on the behalf of William Herbert Gray Jr.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Wachman

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Dr. King informs Dr. Wachman, that due to his extremely busy schedule and his particular attention to the South, he will not be able to accept an invitation to speak at Lincoln University.

SCLC Mail Log: January 12, 1968

Friday, January 12, 1968

This mail log lists several contact names and businesses that have had mailing correspondences with the SCLC. It is an example of the manner by which Dr. King and the SCLC handled such a large quantity of incoming mail every day.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. Spock, pediatrician and Vietnam anti-war activist, writes Dr. King to enlist his support for an anti-war effort by joining in a "statement of common concern" with other "key spokesman for major American interests and institutions." He proposes that the group hold a press conference to release the statement with the intention of encouraging collective action against the Vietnam War. Dr. Spock indicates that he would like to hold the press conference on March 7, 1966. Dr. Spock hopes the group can get an audience with President Johnson to discuss their concerns.

Berkeley, George

Dr. King notes Berkeley's views on metaphysics.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from MLK to the Lamar W. Sessoms Family

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

Dr. King replies to the Sessoms' previous letter that requested assistance in alleviating racial inequality in Mississippi. King informs them that the first step is to "urge the struggle in our own community," and the second step is for everyone to "join together across the nation with people of good will and combat the evils of racism and injustice."

Freedom

Dr. King writes on the topic of "freedom," according to Jeremiah 1:5.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Friday, September 23, 1966

D.Sakrikar writes to solidify the plans for the donation of a bronze statue of Mahatma Gandhi.

U.S. News and World Report: Is Insurrection Brewing in U.S.?

Monday, December 25, 1967

This article in the U.S. News and World Report features an interview with Richard H. Sanger, known for his experience in the United States Foreign Service and his abilities to recognize the patterns of political violence.