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St. Augustine, Florida: 400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

St. Augustine, FL, Jacksonville, FL, Massachusetts (MA), Connecticut (CT), Florida (FL)

The SCLC compiled and published this pamphlet about St. Augustine, Florida, describing a long history of racial discrimination and segregation supported by Northern tourism.

"Negro Rights: Key Dates"

Louisiana (LA), Texas (TX), Oklahoma (OK)

This image depicts the chronological history of laws passed as it pertains to the life and wellbeing of Negros. The first date of reference is January 1st, 1863, the day when slavery was abolished.

SCLC Flyer: Going Out of Business

Texas (TX)

The Fort Worth chapter of the SCLC issued this flyer advising its fellow Negro residents to boycott Bill Sodd's Meat Store because of discrimination.

Letter from Roland Gammon to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963
New York, NY

Roland Gammon requests an interview with Dr. King for a sequel to Faith Is A Star, a book about the role faith has played in the lives of prominent Americans. The sequel will focus on world leaders.

Letter from Mrs. Ted Gustafson to MLK

Sunday, December 10, 1967
New York, NY, Minnesota (MN)

Mrs. Ted Gustafson writes Dr. King to express her dismay with pastors and the pulpit, providing her belief that a Saint is long overdue.

In A Land Where Murder is Respectable

Alabama (AL)

This pamphlet, issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, features a map of Alabama highlighting 18 murders of African Americans and white civil rights workers.

Letter from Rev. C. J. Bell to Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Rev. C. J. Bell, the Editor in Chief of the Alexandria News Leader and pastor of the Progressive Baptist Church, wrote this letter to Dr. Ralph David Abernathy expressing his support following Dr. King's assassination. Abernathy was named Dr. King's successor as president of the SCLC and Bell wishes to offer his help if he can be of service.

Letter from Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority to MLK

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

The Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority extends appreciation to Dr. King for agreeing to speak at their upcoming convention in Philadelphia.

Man (Cause of Sin)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from David Goodwin to MLK

New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

David Goodwin, a child 16 years of age, is outraged by the racial issues in the United States and hopes to be of assistance during the March on Washington despite his young age.

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

Letter from Jimmie Barnett to MLK

Wednesday, March 9, 1966
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL)

A Negro owner of "so-called slum property" takes offense at Dr. King's stance on the subject. He argues that the owners of the properties are primarily Negroes who are not at fault. Dr. King undertook an extensive "End to Slums" campaign in Chicago in 1966 under the sponsorship of the SCLC and various community organizations.

Levels of Love

Dr. King outlines several levels of love, such as Christian love, utilitarianism love and romantic love.

Letter from Governor Philip H. Hoff to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
New York, NY, Vermont (VT)

In this letter, Vermont Governor Philip H. Hoff expresses his gratitude for the autographed book that Dr. King sent to him.

Letter from MLK to Harry Wachtel, Esq.

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King updates Attorney Harry Wachtel about a nonviolence workshop that took place at the Penn Center in Frogmore, South Carolina.

Letter from George Y. Sodowick to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968
Washington, D.C., San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

George Sodowick expresses to Dr. King disapproval of the planned Poor Peoples Campaign of 1968. Sodowick suggests that, instead of occupying Washington, the demonstrators should settle in and enhance "riot torn cities."

Lucky to Be an American

An anonymous person tells Dr. King that he has lost his place as the most liked American. The author infers that Dr. King should not look for everything free and work for his success.

Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie Writes to MLK

Monday, December 18, 1967
NETHERLANDS, SWITZERLAND

Johan Keijser, writing for the Board of the Foundation of Stichting Werkgroep Wereldunie, sends a letter to Dr. King. It includes a list of names of those whom the group has invited to form a committee of support for their efforts in creating a "provisional world government." The list includes artists, intellectuals, national government leaders, and religious leaders from all over the world. Remarkably, it also includes "father of the hydrogen bomb" Edward Teller.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William Smith

Friday, July 31, 1964
California (CA)

Dora McDonald writes William Smith of Fullerton Junior College on behalf of Dr. King, granting permission to reprint material from Time magazine regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Letter from Clarence H. Haines to MLK

Wednesday, August 3, 1966
Massachusetts (MA), GERMANY

Clarence Haines encloses a donation and comments on economic power. Haines suggests a verbal network between Negros so they can learn which stores are integrated and friendly in order to support those business owners.

Briefing Sheet on Cleveland's Civil Rights Issues

Ohio (OH)

This document contains the briefing notes on Cleveland's Civil Rights Issues.

Letter from George W. Monroe to President Johnson

Monday, February 26, 1968
Jacksonville, FL, Washington, D.C.

A former employee of the US Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida, George Monroe, writes again to President Johnson regarding an injury he received and the discrimination he was met with in trying to receive his sick pay and disability benefits. President Johnson had given Monroe's complaint to the Commanding Officer of the USNA in Jacksonville, however, Monroe was still facing difficulty getting help and wrote again to President Johnson to ask for his help. Dr.

Points for Progress, Birmingham, Alabama

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This is a list or outline of points for progress in the Birmingham Campaign. They may have been used in a face-to-face presentation with local community leaders or with media officials. These words carefully enumerate the demands or wishes of the civil rights leaders and the Negro community.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK concerning VISTA volunteer training

Tuesday, November 23, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Maurice A. Dawkins, of the Office of Economic Opportunity, requests leadership training from the SCLC for the VISTA volunteers who were expected to work in the rural South.

Letter of Condolences on the death of MLK

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter of condolence was written less than week after the assassination of Dr. King. In this letter the writer states,"We shall work toward his dream".

Letter from W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. writes the SCLC enclosing a check from various church groups to be used toward Selma expenses.

Letter from the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Oslo, Norway

Dr. Milnor Alexander congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and extends an invitation to for him to speak at the Legislative Seminar during the 50th anniversary celebration of WILPF.

Telegram from MLK to Richard Maguire of the DNC

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs Richard Maguire of the Democratic National Committee that he is unable to accept an invitation to the pre-inaugural dinner.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, January 22, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., JAPAN

Robert Kennedy writes Dr. King requesting to interview him for an oral history program on the Kennedy Administration. Kennedy asserts, "You are obviously one of the persons who ought to be interviewed in order to get a full record of the Administration."

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.