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"UKRAINE"

Letter from Raphael Gould to Dora McDonald Re Thich Nhat Hanh

Friday, January 27, 1967
New York, NY

Raphael Gould, of The Fellowship of Reconciliation, writes to Miss McDonald requesting a letter from Dr. King nominating Thich Nhat Hanh for the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Gould calls attention to the approaching deadline and the extensive documentation that must accompany the letter.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Washington, D.C.

During the year of 1967, Sargent Shriver served as Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity and created several community oriented programs. Shriver sends this telegram to Dr. King informing his support. Shriver appreciates King's ability to be forthright on the condemnation of lawless behavior and causes of social unrest. He agrees that "America must quickly develop and support adequate programs to remove these causes."

Letter to MLK from Irving Zipin

Friday, June 9, 1967
Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, New York (NY)

Mr. Zipin writes to offer his support for Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War.

Telegram from Georgiana Hardy to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 7, 1963
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Georgiana Hardy, president of the Los Angeles City Board of Education, requests a meeting with Dr. King's upon his upcoming visit to California.

Letter from MLK to George Bass

Friday, June 17, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King responds to Mrs. George Bass' recent letter inviting him to speak at the annual convention of the Planned Parenthood Association. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation because his schedule is booked for the entire month of January.

Letter from Ben A. Todd to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, Texas (TX)

Ben A. Todd commends Dr. King for his recent stand against the United States' position in Vietnam, particularly because making such a statement may hurt the Civil Rights Movement.

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Sunday, September 18, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

Letter from Butler Henderson to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Butler Henderson invites Dr. and Mrs. King to the Dinner for the President of Morehouse College, Dr. Benjamin E. Mays.

Letter to Melvin Arnold from MLK

Wednesday, December 26, 1962
New York, NY, New York (NY)

In this correspondence to Mr. Mel Arnold, Dr. King informed him that he has enclosed the final draft of the sixteen sermons to be included, in his second book. He also added that he was in the process of working on the final two sermons to be published in the book.

Montgomery Bus Protest Planning Agenda

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This outline documents information regarding the Montgomery Bus Protest.

Love and Forgiveness

Tuesday, May 5, 1964
New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), INDIA, St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), New Jersey (NJ)

This is a speech entitled "Love and Forgiveness" that Dr. King delivered at the American Baptist Convention meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jesus Christ and segregation serve as the major topics for this speech. Dr. King makes the compelling statements that "Jesus decided to meet hate with love," and that "segregation is still the Negro's burden and America's shame."

Civil-Righters Isolation

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Washington, D.C., California (CA), BAHAMAS, Mississippi (MS), VIETNAM, Texas (TX), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Arizona (AZ)

David Lawrence states that the recent initiatives of Negro leaders are hindering the overall mission of the Civil Rights Movement. He believes that Negro groups are defeating their own cause.

Letter from Joan Daves to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves expresses her gratitude toward Mrs. King for her support of her husband throughout his work in the Civil Rights Movement, following his receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Newspaper Article-New York TImes

Thursday, June 18, 1964
New York (NY)

This newspaper clipping is dated from the June 18, 1964 edition of the New York Times. In this article, Dr. King's new book entitled, "Why We Can't Wait" is advertised as "required reading."

Redbook: The Police

Wednesday, February 1, 1967
New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, California (CA), Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

In this article from Redbook magazine, Sam Blum informs readers that policemen are not only "crime fighters" but also are expected to be skilled in numerous other areas as well. He exposes the FBI's often inaccurate assessment of the cost of crime and states that this is an effort to keep the public in fear and generate increased funding. Blum discusses the different experiences of the middle class and slum-dwellers, the perception of police brutality, and the need for professionalized training.

Forgiveness

Dr. King gives examples of what it means to forgive. Among other definitions, forgiveness means "that the past is overlooked" and that there is "a renewal of higher fellowship."

Letter from Members of a French Church to Dr. King

Monday, January 22, 1968
FRANCE

Members of the Paul - Gerhardt Church in Cologne, France send Dr. King birthday greetings.

Postcard from Jacksonville Beach

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
Jacksonville, FL

This postcard to Dr. King requesting an autograph is one printed by the Jacksonville Beach, Florida Chamber of Commerce.

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College for 1944-1948

Tuesday, November 7, 1950
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College from 1944-1948.

Letter from Margo George to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

Margo George, a student at the Kent School, wrote to Dr. King requesting any suggestions on how she could help with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson

Wednesday, August 10, 1966
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King requests government assistance for the impoverished communities of the Mississippi Delta. He then provides a course of action to improve the standard of living within those communities.

Book Outline: Education and the Urban Poor

Michigan (MI), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., California (CA), Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, New Jersey (NJ), Wisconsin (WI), Berkeley, CA, Illinois (IL)

This book outline lists the chapters and contributing authors of the publication "Education and the Urban Poor." The authors represented include educational professionals from all over the country including Robert L. Green, Associate Professor at Michigan State University and Education Director for the SCLC. Dr. King is listed as the author of Chapter Two entitled "Education and the Negro Revolution."

Photograph of MLK Receiving Honorary Degree

Monday, June 1, 1959
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

This photograph shows Dr. King receiving an honorary degree from Boston University.

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
SWITZERLAND

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.

MLK Interview with Glenn E. Smiley

Thursday, March 1, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This early (1956) interview with Dr. King has as its center the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in Dr. King's career and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from David Goodwin to MLK

New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

David Goodwin, a child 16 years of age, is outraged by the racial issues in the United States and hopes to be of assistance during the March on Washington despite his young age.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Letter to Baron Allard from Mrs. King

Thursday, June 15, 1967
BELGIUM, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King writes to Baron Allard to thank him for the time she spent in Belgium. She thanks him for the gifts he sent for her loved ones and extends an invitation to visit when he travels to Atlanta.

Dexter Echo: July 6, 1960

Wednesday, July 6, 1960
Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Memphis, TN, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL

This July 1960 newsletter of The Dexter Echo is sent to Dr. and Mrs. King. The newsletter covers recent events of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, the church Dr. King pastored during his time in Birmingham, Alabama. The main article "Christian Control and Action Amid Social Tensions" questions how to manage life's tensions and discusses the nature of fear. The newsletter also includes an article on Men's Day and shares the news on various congregation members.

Tribute to Dr. King by Rev. Joseph L. Roberts

Friday, April 5, 1968
Detroit, MI

In this document, Rev. Joseph L. Roberts, Presiding Elder for the West Detroit District of the AME church, delivered this profound tribute to Dr. King, the day after his assassination.