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Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March

This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

A. N. Whitehead

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's view of the philosophy of science in The Concept of Nature.

MLK Address at the National Biennial Convention

Wednesday, May 14, 1958

Dr. King delivers this speech at the National Biennial Convention of the American Jewish Congress. The convention took place May 1, 1958 in Miami Beach, Florida. Dr. King discusses how the Jewish and Negro communities are unified by the escape of bondage. They share a common fight against the deadly enemies of oppression. He continues on to discuss the things that need to be done in order for African Americans to reach great potential along with the importance of fighting for and obtaining democracy.

Commentary on MLK Article

This article describes Dr. King's approval of a recent civil rights ordinance passing in Gary, Indiana. The purpose of the ordinance is to prohibit discrimination in the sale, rental, leasing or financing of real estate. Dr. King thanks the community and members of the City Council for making the ordinance possible.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding German Re-Publicaition

Monday, May 11, 1964

In this letter Daves informs Dr. King of what Mr. Von Wehrenalp, Dr. King's German publisher, might have had in mind for Dr. King's special introduction for the German edition. Ms. Daves further discusses other possible uses for such a piece.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Book Autographs

Friday, August 28, 1964

With this letter Joan Daves sends three copies of "Why We Cant Wait" to Ms. McDonald requesting them to be autographed by Dr. King and returned to the specified recipients.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Fred Koury

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

In this letter, Dora McDonald tells Fred Koury that Dr. King cannot attend the Annual Spring Conference of the United Federation of Teachers due to prior commitments.

Letter from Congressman Ralph J. Rivers to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Representative Rivers of Alaska informs Dr. King that he intends to sign the District of Columbia Home Rule Bill.

Letter from Roger Threats to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Roger Threats, a student from New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King death. In the letter, Threats describes his own dream, which is an end to fighting.

Letter from the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1968

The executive board of the Milwaukee Operation Breadbasket informs Dr. King of the works and efforts of their organization. The SCLC's Operation Breadbasket originated the very principles and methods in which the Milwaukee chapter operates. The chapter has initiated many employment opportunities and increased the economic status of the Negro community. Dr. King is requested to provide them with the official documentation to charter their chapter of Operation Breadbasket. Furthermore, they would greatly appreciate the opportunity to see Dr. King in an appearance in Milwaukee.

American Journal: Let Justice Roll Down

Monday, June 6, 1966

Carey McWilliams writes to Dr. King to inform him his article, "Let Justice Roll Down," was included in the American Journal, a publication by the US Information Service aimed at representing opinions and current subjects of interest in the United States. This edition, published in 1965, was he 5th year in a row Dr. King had contributed an article describing the tempo of the Civil Rights Movement in the United States.

Lifts to Living

Nanny H. Burroughs sends a short book entitled "Here and Beyond - The Sunset" with her signature and tag line to wish Dr. King a glorious New Year. The book contains a list of inspirational songs, parables, and poems regarding the process of life and spiritual encouragement.

Letter from Perceel Lanfair to MLK

Perceel Lanfair informs Dr. King that she and her husband are looking for a larger apartment.

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

Letter from John to MLK

John discusses some points on religious ethics with Dr. King and offers gratitude for a Labor Day dinner with the King family.

Judgment

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the "day of the Lord." According to Amos, this would be a day of judgment, opposed to a day of national exaltation.

People to People

Dr. King announces the SCLC's launching of a People to People tour of four northern cities. The SCLC launched this tour in the north to display a concern for the "moral welfare of Northern Negroes."

Letter from Ms. McDonald to Ms. Elinor G. Galusha

Thursday, October 27, 1966

In this letter dated October 28, 1966, Ms. McDonald tells Ms. Galusha that she may use an excerpt from Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe, associate of literary agent Joan Daves, encloses royalties for Dr. King's French edition of "Strength to Love".

Letter from Margo Belden to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Margo Belden inquires about materials from Dr. King for Choice '68, the national collegiate presidential primary.

Press Release - American Jewish Congress

Monday, March 4, 1968

Richard Cohen issues a statement on behalf of Murray A. Gordon, Dorothy Jones, and Arthur A. Wright. The statement denounces the article written by John F. Hatchett for the African-American Teachers Association Forum.

JFK's Executive Order In Housing

Thursday, December 13, 1962

This document is a draft of an article, written by Dr. King, to be placed in the Amsterdam Newspaper. Dr. King breaks down the housing order signed into law by President Kennedy. He makes clear that housing discrimination is a large hurdle to ending segregation.

SCLC Confab Boasts Galaxy of Civil Rights Stars

The SCLC has chosen Birmingham, Alabama as the place for their Sixth Annual Convention. It includes the Annual Freedom Dinner, that will honor the top personalities identified with the Negro struggle. The convention also includes presentations from major authorities on nonviolence.

Address by MLK to Southern Association of Political Scientist

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issues of poverty, unemployment, education, health, and housing disparities within the nation. Granted, many strides have been made but there is still more work to be done. Equality has still not come full circle in regards to these social issues. Dr. King urges the people to continue the fight of social justice in all aspects of inequality.

Folder

The folder, shown here, contained a sermon of Dr. King entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians." This address was one of Dr. King's well-known sermons.

Teacher's Manual: Civil Disobedience, Morality, and the Coming of the Civil War

Muriel Moulton of Chicago, Illinois provides a course manual for teaching civil disobedience and morality leading up to the American Civil War. Moulton does not assign a value to the morality of civil disobedience, but only poses the question while providing primary sources for interpretation.

Suffering

Dr. King writes that the view of suffering in Job 20 is fallacious.

Presentation of the Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights

Dr. King was a recipient of the first Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights. This award was issued by the Jamaican Government and was presented to Coretta Scott King due to the tragic death of Dr. King earlier in the year. This program outlines that event.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

In this letter Ms. Daves informs Dr. King that she is working to solve issue of copyright for his Oslo University address, and stresses the importance of copyrighting all of his "writings...and speeches."