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"UKRAINE"

Letter from Governor John Reynolds to MLK

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Governor Reynolds requests Dr. King to speak at a Conference on Civil Rights in celebration of the centennial year of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter to Ralph D. Abernathy from Ralph E. Gulliver

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

The James H. Farrell Lodge contributes to the SCLC for the cause of Freedom-Now.

Telegram from Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz offer their encouragement to Dr. King.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Members List

This document lists members of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, Commission on National Programs and Policies as of December 1965.

Operation Breadbasket of the SCLC

How to Win Jobs And Influence Businessmen; a speech given by the SCLC'S Operation Breadbasket, discusses job discrimination and the stimulation of Negro businessmen.

Worship

Dr. King defines worship.

SCLC Warns of Disaster in Mississippi

The SCLC issues a statement regarding a fire that destroyed their office at the Bell Flower Baptist Church in Grenada, Mississippi. The SCLC set up a new office in Grenada to continue programs including school integration, voter registration, and development of community leadership.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Rodney Clurman writes to Dr. King concerning recent updates with regard to political and social agendas. He concludes by requesting a wire transfer to his current location in New York City.

Essay on Violence and Nonviolence

The impractical and immoral effect of violence and testimony to the moral power and efficiency of nonviolence are discussed in this essay. Violence is recognized as achieving social justice with great results, but not without damage to society. Although a much tougher way of seeking social justice, nonviolence is a more satisfying lasting solution.

Address at a Conference of Religious Leaders Under the Sponsorship of the President's Committee on Government Contracts

Monday, May 11, 1959

Dr. King addresses a delegation of religious leaders at a conference hosted by the President's Committee on Government Contracts. In this pivotal speech, Dr. King outlines the responsibilites of clergymen and government officials in combating poverty and economic discrimination. He stresses the need for lay leaders and representatives of government to bodly speak out against the vestiges of discrimination that continuously hinder the economic and social progress of Negroes in America.

Letter from Dupree Jordan to MLK about Office of Economic Opportunity

Thursday, November 17, 1966

In this letter, dated November 17, 1966, Jordan is requesting a meeting with King to discuss the efforts of Office of Economic Opportunity (O.E.O.). Jordan is Director of Public Affairs at O.E.O. King attended O.E.O.'s meetings with the Child Development Group of Mississippi a few weeks prior to this letter.

Letter from Robert Harris to SCLC

Thursday, June 17, 1965

Mr. Harris offers the SCLC assistance from the Michigan Chapter of the Law Students Civil Rights Research Council to research civil rights problems.

Letter from Reese High School Student to MLK

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

Ann Renwick, a senior at Reese High School, informs Dr. King of a term paper she is writing about him and requests information regarding his next visit to Detroit. She also expresses discontent with prejudices against Negros in her small all-white town, but is determined to change the mentality of her peers.

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, confirms a meeting with President Kennedy and Dr. King to discuss the Birmingham bombing incident.

God the Inescapable

Dr. King references the book of Psalms regarding the topic "God the Inescapable." King speaks about man attempting to hide from God, but ultimately expresses that this impossible to do.

Christianity and Crisis: April 3, 1967

Monday, April 3, 1967

Roger L. Shinn wrote this article for Christianity and Crisis: A Christian Journal of Opinion. Shinn defines a "conscientious objector" as one who believes a war morally unjustifiable, and chooses, therefore, not to serve in it. Several Christian organizations attempted to introduce legislation banning forced participation. The American Civil Liberties Union has encouraged the selective service system to recognize a policy "under which no person shall be compelled to participate in armed conflict when he believes it to be in violation of his conscience."

Letter from Mary Hart to MLK

In one of three letters Mary Hart sends Dr. King, she thanks him for his efforts in assisting poor people in America. Hart says that she is representing all poor people and sends apologies that she will not be present for the March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from Mr. William A. Linsley to MLK

Wednesday, February 8, 1967

This document features a faculty member from the University of Houston conferring with Dr. King on "I Have a Dream" materials to be used for his students' curriculum.

Religious Education

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Cosomological Argument for God

Dr. King references the cosmological argument for God.

Letter from George W. Parker

Tuesday, June 19, 1962

George Parker explains his theory of mind control as a "mass electronic psychological weapon." He also details how this weapon is currently being employed.

I Have A Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Dr. King delivered the "I Have A Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963. Along with Lincoln's "Gettysburg Address," it is considered to be one of the greatest speeches of all time.

Letter from Karen Ladin to God

In her letter to God, Karen Ladin expresses concern for the plight of the Negro.

Letter from Dr. D. F. Harris to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

Dr. D. F. Harris asks Dr. King if he can participate in the upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He gives Dr. King the names of people who can be contacted for information about his background, including Dr. Milton Reid, pastor of the New Calvary Baptist Church in Norfolk, Virginia.

Letter from Rev. Theodore L. Fischer to MLK

Wednesday, June 23, 1965

Rev. Theodore Fischer of the Comittee on Religion and Race of the Eastern Pennsylvania Synod offers support to end discrimination in housing.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

Letter from Vince Hartke to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Democratic Indiana Senator Vance Hartke informs Dr. King that the Senate might not vote on the issue of the Voting Rights Bill due to a recent decision concerning the constitutionality of a poll tax.

MLK Fights For Peace

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Included on page four of this Bedding, Curtain and Drapery Workers Union newsletter is an article regarding Dr. King's courageous efforts in helping Negros achieve equality, and the support he has received from the trade union. The union also supports Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam war, and agrees that the war is harming America's domestic programs against poverty.

Get Well Letter from Albert Adams to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Saturday, September 20, 1958

Out of the many well wishes sent to Dr. King, he received one in particular from this New York inmate, Albert Adams. Mr. Adams wished Dr. King a full recovery and prayed that he would not, again, endure the same hardship.

Letter from Marie Brookter to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Marie Brookter offers Dr. King "information as to the needs of the Poor" in preparation for the upcoming March of Poor People to Washington.