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"UKRAINE"

Pass The Ammunition

Ernie Sheffield voices his opinion on the "Department of War Violence and Brute Force" and the spending of a billion dollars a week on violence. He states that in their spending of valuable money not "even a dime" has been spent on a "Department of Peace, Goodwill and Coexistence."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter White

Friday, September 10, 1965

Dora McDonald notifies Peter White, of the University of Western Ontario, that Dr. King is unable to accept any additional speaking engagements for the "next seven or eight months."

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

The Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Commission on Community Activity and Organization lists various members from different organizations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Dora McDonald updates Dr. King regarding the numerous letters, invitations, phone calls and other pending business matters while he has been away from the office. During this period of absence, Dr. King had been imprisoned and was now recovering at home.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ruby Hurley

Thursday, January 3, 1963

At Dr. King's request, Ms. McDonald sends Ruby Hurley a check from Delores Robinson for a lifetime membership in the NAACP.

MLK Memorandum on SCLC Direct Action Plans

In this confidential memorandum, Dr. King outlines SCLC’s direct action program for Birmingham, Alabama and Danville, Virginia. For each community, he states the challenges, defines goals, and then provides detailed steps to be taken and also staff assignments. He promises to outline his plan for Montgomery, Alabama in a few days.

Christianity

Dr. King quotes from Nietzsche's "The AntiChrist."

Telegram from Harry Belafonte to Coretta Scott King

In this telegram, Mr. Belafonte sympathizes with Mrs. King as she is preparing for Dr. King's sentence of four months in prison.

Letter from R. Belui to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

R. Belui thanks Dr. King for his courage in the fight for social justice. He also expresses his wishes for Dr. King's to be a presidential candidate.

Letter from Dorris M. Roberts to MLK

Dorris Roberts, Chairman of the New Breed Committee, writes to Dr. King concerning inaccurate statements regarding her organization's participation in a recent march. Mrs. Roberts encloses a newspaper article regarding the march and also requests that Dr. King release a statement declaring that the New Breed Committee were supporters of the march and not protestors.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington to MLK

Friday, January 19, 1968

Huntington writes to Dr. King concerning the separation of a mother and child in hospitals after birth. Huntington states, "If we get back to nature's ways in our hospitals instead of starting each new human life in America by rejecting it, as it were, I suspect the increase of juvenile delinquency would melt away."

Letter from Mrs. Ted Gustafson to MLK

Sunday, December 10, 1967

Mrs. Ted Gustafson writes Dr. King to express her dismay with pastors and the pulpit, providing her belief that a Saint is long overdue.

"How To Make History"

Mr. Eisenman acknowledges the irony of how America, which was created after a war of liberation, has now gone against everything it was founded upon.

Letter From E. Spencer Parsons to MLK

Thursday, June 8, 1967

E. Spencer Parsons, Dean of the Rockefeller Memorial Chapel at the University of Chicago, invites Dr. King to preach at a university religious service. He also commends him for the leadership he has provided Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam.

We Shall Overcome

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

This program serves as a memorial exercise for Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carol Robertson and Cynthia Wesley.

Methodist Church Statement on Vietnam Conflict

The Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church releases a statement regarding the conflict in Vietnam and possible outcomes and solutions. The board urges steps leading to a withdrawal of US forces from Vietnam.

What Moderation Means

Saturday, August 14, 1965

Dr. King explores the meaning of the word moderation, and shares his thoughts on its position in relation to nonviolence.

Letter and Questionnaire from Ronald B. Lee to MLK

Ronald B. Lee, a student of American University, requests that Dr. King complete a questionnaire concerning the SCLC's involvement in the June White House Conference "To Fulfill These Rights." The questions include how the SCLC was informed of this meeting, the conference, contributions, and more.

SCLC Newsletter: October-November 1965

Friday, October 1, 1965

This SCLC newsletter depicts the courage of SCLC workers putting their lives on the line while fighting for civil rights. The newsletter also highlights pictures from SCLC's ninth annual convention in Birmingham Alabama and a children's book about Dr. King.

An Open Letter to Free Americans

In response to Dr. King's assassination, the author urges "Free Americans" to join the fight against racism.

Letter from Mary T. Clark to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

This letter from the Social Action Secretariat, National Federation of Catholic College Students references an enclosed letter which was issued to all member colleges. The enclosed letter supports student activity in the 1964 Freedom Fast.

Beyond Vietnam

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

In Dr. Kings Beyond Vietnam address, he discusses seven major reasons for bringing Vietnam into "a field of moral vision," five things that the government should do to remove itself from conflict with Vietnam, the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam, and Premier Diem. Dr. King also encourages those in the churches and the synagogues to speak out against the war in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Ambassador and Madam J. Graham Parsons

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Ambassador and Madam J. Graham Parsons for the reception and their hospitality during Dr. King's visit to Sweden.

MLK's Address to American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa

Saturday, November 24, 1962

Drawing connections between the social injustices of two continents, Dr. King discusses the relationship between segregation in America and colonialism in Africa. Dr. King also shares his opinion about America dominating Africa politically and economically.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson, a civil rights activist and politician, invites Dr. King to speak at a concert that will benefit the children of Medgar Evers and the families of the girls killed in the bombing of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church. Culbertson explains that the program will feature performances from different choirs. He also mentions that if Dr. King is unable to attend, he would appreciate Dr. King's help securing another prominent speaker.

Letter from Lanette J. Campbell

Saturday, March 16, 1968

Lanette J. Campbell requests information regarding candidates in the Choice '68 presidential primary.

Gandhi Smarak Nidhi: Its Work and Plans Booklet

This booklet contains information on initiatives being brought to fruition by the Gandhi National Memorial Fund. Dr. and Mrs. King appear in a photo on page eight.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Lester Kendel Jackson

Monday, April 30, 1962

Dr. King writes to Dr. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church regarding Dr. Jackson's recent visit to Atlanta. Dr. King offers a heartfelt apology to Dr. Jackson for not meeting with him due to sequence of miscommunications and unavoidable events.

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Press Release from SCLC on New Biography of MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

This 1964 press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference focuses on a new biography of Dr. King "...written especially for children."