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MLK Handwritten Notecard on "Scientific Method"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines "Scientific Method."

Mississippi Project

The Mississippi Project is developed by SNCC which rooted from the evident white supremacy in this state. The organization sought to take action to eradicate the societal restrictions of the American Negro. The summer project will involve voter registration, freedom schools, community centers, and many more sectional projects.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

The Irish Echo: Ann Daly's Corner

Saturday, June 15, 1963

Ann Daly, a writer for the Irish Echo newspaper, reviews Dr. King's "Strength to Love" and recommends that her readers get a copy of it. She notes that the Irish community should be sympathetic to the plight of Negroes in Alabama because their Irish ancestors also endured oppression. She also gives her opinion on a Gaelic society publication, a book for teenage boys, and recent Irish cultural events.

Letter from E. Rawley to MLK

E. Rawley writes Dr. King stating, "you are judged by the company you keep." Furthermore, Rawley asserts that King will end up a "nothing" when he is on the brink of fame and respect.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Introduction to Philosophy." Brightman was a Christian theologan in the Methodist tradition.

Telegram from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, December 20, 1967

Bayard Rustin informs Dr. King that Albert Shanker, President of the United Federation of Teachers, has been sentenced to fifteen days in jail. He requests Dr. King to contribute $5.00 towards the payment of Mr. Shanker's fine and for permission to state publicly that he has contributed.

Letter from MLK to Rev. W.W. Finlator about Preaching Invitation

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King offers deep regrets to Rev. Finlator for his inability to accept an invitation to preach at The Pullen Memorial Baptist Church.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves Regarding MLK's Book Draft

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Genevieve Young, from Harper & Row Publishers, expresses concern regarding an outline for Dr. King's upcoming book. She suggests an alternative way to frame the outline, and advises Joan Daves to use her discretion as to whether or not the memorandum should be passed on to Dr. King.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Letter of Inspiration from Dwight Church to MLK

Tuesday, January 10, 1967

Dwight Church informs Dr. King that "actions count more than words." He further shares details about Clayton Powell and the progress of the Irish.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King highlights a quote from "Evil and the Christian Faith" by Nels F S. Ferre regarding Jesus and his relationship with humanity.

God (His Love)

Dr. King writes that the answer to F. W. H. Myers' question about whether the universe is friendly lies at the basis of religion. His cites E. C. Wilm's "The Problem of Religion."

Letter from Inam Rahman to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964

Inam Rahman, member of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations, sends Dr. King a copy of the letter from the President of the Council inviting him to present a speech at the Azad Memorial Lectures.

Letter from Guy Heinemann to MLK

Wednesday, June 12, 1963

Guy Heinemann states that several copies of the Civil Rights issue of the Yale Political have been sent to Dr. King.

Letter from Colin W. Bell to MLK

Tuesday, May 17, 1966

Colin W. Bell invites Dr. King to deliver a lecture during the anniversary activities of the American Friends Service Committee. This letter also includes Dora McDonald's shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Fannie Lou Hamer to Friends

Monday, October 23, 1967

Mrs. Fannie Lou Hamer requests the help of 'Friends', pertaining to voting rights in Mississippi. Mrs. Hamer also details some of the sufferings of black folks in Mississippi, especially, as it pertains to potential repercussions for them registering to vote.

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.

Letter from Augusta Hill to MLK

Sunday, October 10, 1965

Augusta Hill, president of the newly formed Negro American Labor Council, requests that Dr. King visit Racine, Wisconsin in an effort to help address the employment discrimination occurring there.

Letter from Rev. Hedley W. Plunkett to MLK

Friday, March 3, 1967

Reverend Hedley W. Plunkett of Belfast, Northern Ireland, invites Dr. King to include the city on his schedule the next time he comes to Europe. Plunkett describes his interest in King's work and Ireland's own "Color Bar."

Letter from MLK to Dwight Campbelll

Friday, September 11, 1964

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Methodist Youth Fellowship to speak in Philadelphia.

Fichte on God

Dr. King references Kantian protege Johann Gottlieb Fichte and philosophically defines God as the "moral order of the universe."

And There Was Love

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Letter from MLK to William Sibley

Monday, July 13, 1964

Dr. King thanks Dr. Sibley for his contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He also reports the results of a recent fundraising reception, which will be used to establish Dr. Robert Hayling's practice and provide legal defense to participants in the Albany and St. Augustine Movements.

Letter from Rev. Celestine Fernado to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

The Editor of the Ceylon Churchman, Reverend Celestine Fernando, request a copy of Dr. King's letter from jail to publish in the magazine. Reverend Fernando is certain that this publication is a great message and will allow the church to re-evaluate its work.

Postcard from J. Mason

Mason requests that Dr. King focus more on black youth crime rates, orphan children and other charitable activities within the black community.

Letter from William S. Minor to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965

William Minor, the Director of The Foundation for Creative Philosophy, invites Dr. King to speak at The Society for Creative Ethics meeting in New York.

The Cold War: The Insanity of Deterrence

This brochure depicts a child asking "mommy, what's an H bomb?" and serves as anti-nuclear war propaganda.

TV: Return of Susskind

Monday, October 3, 1966

This article reviews a series of television shows that aired on various networks dealing with politics and race relations. Among the programs mentioned is a segment featuring Senator Kennedy as well as a documentary entitled "The Agony of Two Cities" centered on segregation.