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Letter from Theodore E. Brown to MLK and Others

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Mr. Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other members of the ANLCA's call committee of vaccinations required when traveling internationally.

Why We Chose Jail Rather than Bail

Dr. King cites seven reasons for choosing jail not bail. Among them is that ?the highest expression of nonviolence is self suffering.?


Dr. King quotes the views of Italian politician Benito Mussolini, English public intellectual John Ruskin, and Nazi politician Dr. Robert Ley on war and its relationship to masculinity.

Letter from Stephen J. M. Robbins to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Stephen Robbins thanks Dr. King for inviting the United States National Student Association to participate in the demonstrations in Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. Robbins states that the organization has directed its focus to equal opportunity for all and protection for demonstrators. Robbins also invites Dr. King to address the 18th National Student Congress at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

The Denver Post Reprint "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shaby Clothes"

Thursday, January 25, 1962

In this reprint, of the Denver Post article, entitled "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shabby Clothes", the reader learns that a 13 year old boy did not go to school because he was ashamed by his clothes. The Colorado judge responded with an attempt to get the boy new clothes and reinstated in school.

Letter from Robert Lee King to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

A member of Ebenezer Baptist Church expresses concern over Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham Jail. Robert Lee King also shares his wish that he could physically be in jail as well to aid in the "freedom of all Americans." Though nothing in the letter has been blocked out, the letter does contain a stamp of the word "censored."

Letter from MLK to Zelma George

Wednesday, November 6, 1963

Dr. King thanks Zelma George and her husband for their hospitality while he visited Cleveland.

Letter from Reverend C. William Billingslea to MLK

Tuesday, July 24, 1962

Reverend C. William Billingslea notifies Dr. King that the Northern Christian Leadership Conference wants to assist the movement through mass rallies, speeches, fund-raising, etc. Reverend Billingslea also asks Dr. King to provide a Freedom Fighter to come and speak to the organization.

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

Letter from Leslie Cohen to MLK

Leslie Cohen informs Dr. King that Miss Egnal's eighth grade classes from Great Neck South Junior High School in New York have each elected him their "Man of the Year" over all other world leaders.


Dr. King writes about the proper function of philosophy.


Dr. King defines "deism" as a concept developed by a group of English and French religious thinkers who "interpreted God purely in terms of natural order" during the 17th and 18th century.

Project Concern Pamphlet

This Pamphlet, made by Project Concern, discusses the efforts taken to help the impoverished and sick.

Letter from George Graham to MLK

Thursday, September 1, 1966

Mr. Graham thanks Dr.King for replying to his letter, and expresses how much he enjoyed seeing him when he visited Raleigh.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Sadye Brooks

Friday, April 28, 1967

Dr. and Mrs. King offer their condolences to the Brooks family on the recent loss of their beloved husband and father.

Letter from Sheldon L. Gutman to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Sheldon L. Gutman writes Dr. King urging him to utilize his prominence by consistently speaking out about the issues of the world. Gutman also expresses concern regarding America's potential retaliation to China detonating a hydrogen bomb.


Dr. King cross-references fundamentalism with authoritarianism.

Founders Day Address

Dr. King addresses Spelman College at their Founders Day celebration. He discusses issues such as the Promised Land and the function of education.

Victor Capron Requests MLK Deliver Condolences to Lt. Col. Odumeguu Ojukuu

Thursday, March 14, 1968

Capron requests that Dr. King deliver a personal message of condolence to the President of Biafra, Lt. Col. Odumegwu Ojukwu. MLK's trip to Biafra in March of 1968 was canceled.

Letter from James Hamilton and Frank Pohlhaus

Friday, March 31, 1967

James Hamilton and Francis Pohlhaus offer the Leadership Conference Executive Committee a list of recommendations on school desegregation. They also provide information on reasons why goals toward equal education have not been progressing as needed.

Peace of Mind or Soul

Dr. King quotes French physiologist Dr. Charles Richet.

Freedom Walk Committee of Ithaca

This form letter from the Freedom Walk Committee of Ithaca and the Cornell Committee Against Segregation announces both the guest appearance of Dr. King as well as a fundraising drive for the SCLC.

Speaking Out

Dr. King discusses the roles of Civil Rights leaders. He states that leaders do not control crime but have the responsibility of maintaining discipline. Dr. King reminds his audience that the Negro was the creator of nonviolence.

I Will Vote For You

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Mr. Joe Kozne proclaims allegiance to Dr. King and his political aspirations if George Wallace, the governor of Alabama, runs for presidency.

Letter from Walter G. Pietsch to MLK

Thursday, January 12, 1967

Walter G. Peitsch asks Dr. King to support a resolution to reinstate Adam Clayton Powell to his seat in the United States House of Representatives and his Chairmanship of the United States Committee on Education and Labor.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Friday, May 20, 1966

Mr. Clark, a representative of the United States Senate, requests a written statement from Dr. King concerning a recent Bill (2993) up for election.

Faith in Man

Dr. King discusses people's general lack of faith in man. He asserts that because of Christianity one can have faith in man because "man's plight is never so low that he can't do better."

Letter from Sonja Lid Larssen and Lars Andr. Larssen to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

The Fredskontoret (Peace Bureau) of Norway congratulates Dr. King on his being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize and requests that he presents for the inhabitants of Stavanger. The authors detail four reasons why he should accept this invitation, with one including a public meeting concerning nonviolence.

Letter from Bob Strain to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1961

Bob Strain writes Dr. King after reading an article in Newsweek entitled "Albany Movement." He apologizes for the ignorant behavior of fellow whites and expresses his desire to be a part of the movement. He also conveys his admiration for Dr. King and his work.

Telegram from Andrew Hieskell and A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Dr. King receives this telegram from Mr. Heiskell and Mr. Randolph regarding the newly appointed chief executive of the National Urban Coalition.