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Letter from Dora McDonald to Jessie Stephens

Wednesday, September 16, 1964
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Miss McDonald informs Jessie Stephens that Dr. King is out of the country, but she recommends that Mrs. Stephens contact Dr. King's lawyer, Chauncey Eskridge, for help.

Letter from Mr. David Winder to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Boston, MA

Mr. David Winder writes Dr. King in an attempt to gain an interview during one of Dr. King's upcoming visits to New York.

Transcript of Press Conference on Hotel Restaurant Desegregation

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King states in this 1962 press conference that he sees integration of Atlanta hotels and restaurants as imminent. With the exception of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina, civil rights are progressing throughout the South. The many groups working on the issue are working toward a common goal and using a variety of strategies, including direct action, litigation, legislation, and education.

Dexter Echo: July 6, 1960

Wednesday, July 6, 1960
Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Memphis, TN, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL

This July 1960 newsletter of The Dexter Echo is sent to Dr. and Mrs. King. The newsletter covers recent events of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, the church Dr. King pastored during his time in Birmingham, Alabama. The main article "Christian Control and Action Amid Social Tensions" questions how to manage life's tensions and discusses the nature of fear. The newsletter also includes an article on Men's Day and shares the news on various congregation members.

Hegel System Diagram

Dr. King outlines notes regarding Hegel's system, which includes logic, nature, the mind and the spirit.

God

ISRAEL

Dr. King writes about God, according to Jeremiah 3:12.

Nature of Religion

Dr. King indicates Schleiermacher's view on the nature of religion.

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., GERMANY

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to Richard M. Austin

Friday, February 2, 1968
Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

William A. Rutherford, Executive Director of the SCLC, requests that Rev. Austin join a SCLC support committee. The support committee will offer assistance to the SCLC's upcoming campaign in Washington, D.C.

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs.Rousseau

California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs. Rousseau was about his views on Vietnam. He believed that America's involvement in Vietnam was wrong and that the United States was on the wrong side of peace.

Highlander Reports: Black Power in Mississipi

Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS), South Carolina (SC), Atlantic City, NJ, Michigan (MI), Kentucky (KY)

In this newsletter, the writers speak about various issues concerning African Americans and their discrimination in politics.

Letter from Mrs. R. K. Matthews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter is from a middle class housewife who expressed her despair and frustration to Mrs. King in learning of Dr. King's assassination.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1961

Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA), Prince Edward County, VA, Atlanta, GA, SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Johannesburg, South Africa, Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, Connecticut (CT), North Carolina (NC), KENYA

This September 1961 SCLC newsletter opens with a description of the Annual Convention scheduled to take place later that month in Nashville, Tennessee. The next section includes brief biographies of Harry Belefonte and South African singer Miriam Makeba, both slated to star in the convention's opening benefit concert. This section also outlines the advances SCLC made in its Leadership Training Program and future plans for the Citizenship Program, dedicated to increasing literacy in southern states.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Support Letter to MLK

Wednesday, January 10, 1962

Kiser writes Dr. King to enclose a financial contribution and expresses the need for better integration.

Letter from Rev. Charles William Butler to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1961
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Missouri (MO)

Dr. King writes to Rev. Charles William Butler of the Metropolitan Baptist Church to acknowledge receipt of his kind letter concerning moral support. Dr. King references his shock of reading about a vicious attack made by Dr. Jackson accusing him of conspiracy. Stating that numerous friends have suggested that the Reverend sue Jackson, Dr. King expresses his decision to be adherent to his basic philosophy of non-violence.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald

Friday, August 11, 1967
New York (NY)

Gitta Badeker informs Dora McDonald of an offer from Santi Ando & Figli for the Italian rights to "Where Do We Go from Here," and includes administrative instructions on how to proceed.

Philosopher (definition)

Dr. King quotes poet William Wordsworth's definition of a philosopher.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Court Hearings

Friday, December 3, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Dr. King compares past discrimination to recent strides that have been made in the American justice system.

Letter from Ivor Liss to MLK

Monday, April 15, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA, POLAND, HUNGARY

Ivor M. Liss writes Dr. King and explains his support for the movement that Dr. King is leading. He talks about how being silent would actually hurt Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement. Liss explains that as a Jew he understands the fight for equality as it is something that Jewish people are still fighting for. He encloses a check for $100.00.

Letter from MLK to Harry Wachtel, Esq.

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King updates Attorney Harry Wachtel about a nonviolence workshop that took place at the Penn Center in Frogmore, South Carolina.

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College for 1944-1948

Tuesday, November 7, 1950
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This is Dr. King's official transcript from Morehouse College from 1944-1948.

Letter from David Diamond to MLK

Tuesday, May 31, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

David Diamond, author of the book "A Bucket of Whitewash" inquires about Dr. King providing commentary for his upcoming release. As a result, Diamond is set to share royalties from his book sales with the SCLC.

Letter from Gunnar Fagerberg to MLK

Sunday, November 1, 1964
SWEDEN, Oslo, Norway, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is the recipient of this invitation to speak made by the students of the Chalmers University of Technology in Sweden.

Letter from William Woodall to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

Mr. Woodall relays instructions from God concerning Dr. King's next march.

Letter from Margaret & Richard Dodge to MLK

Sunday, March 21, 1965

Margaret and Richard Dodge inform Dr. King of a successful fundraiser they hosted and enclose the profits to help Dr. King in the civil rights movement.

Letter from MLK on behalf of Cosby Wallace

Monday, January 22, 1968

Dr. King requests reconsideration of Mr. Cosby Wallace's status in the U. S. Army. The financial strain on Mr. Wallace’s family and a physical disability warrants his not being inducted.

Memorandum Regarding Fund Raising and Sale of Memorial Objects

Wednesday, May 8, 1968

William A. Rutherford alerts SCLC members that Dr. King's name is being used in various parts of the country to obtain a profit. These individuals have used the organization's name as well as that of the Poor Peoples Campaign. These actions are unlawful and have not been certified by SCLC's headquarters.

Committee to Adopt a Freedom Rider

Saturday, August 5, 1961
New York (NY)

This is a brochure to an event entitled the Card Party. This event is catered to raising funds to adopt a freedom rider.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Friday, August 9, 1963
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.