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Statement to Confront the Conflict in Harlem

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. Arthur C. Logan, Chairman of the Board of Directors for HARYOU-ACT, Inc., writes this statement addressing the conflict in Harlem. According to Logan, "the present conflict in the Harlem community is a consequence of a long-standing feeling of powerlessness and its resultant frustrations." Specifically, the unrest in Harlem is attributed to the unreasonable behavior and inadequate training of the Police Department. This statement includes a list of recommendations to help confront the crisis.

Letter from Silas Norman to MLK

Tuesday, July 20, 1965

Silas Norman, State Project Director of the Alabama SNCC, writes Dr. King to inform him that they have not received a response from a past telegram inviting him to speak at a rally in Lowndes County, Alabama.

Letter to MLK from F.D. Patterson regarding Differences of Opinion

Monday, April 17, 1967

The president of Phelps-Stokes Fund writes to encourage Dr. King to meet annually with other Negro leaders for a discussion on their differences of opinion.

Letter from Steve Allen to MLK

Tuesday, March 1, 1966

Mr. Allen forwards Dr. King a letter from Paul C. Hosfeldt in which Mr. Hosfeldt calls Dr. King a Communist. Mr. Allen believes that this letter will be of interest to Dr. King and his attorneys.

Letter from Sandra A. Lonsfoote to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968

Sandra A. Lonsfoote, Campus Coordinator at Bethel College, writes Dr. King requesting campaign information for the Choice 68' campaign.

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Sunday, February 20, 1966

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

This is SCLC

This SCLC brochure highlights the organization's mission, organizational structure, and initiatives, such as voter registration drives, Citizenship Schools, and the Leadership Training Program.

SCLC Newsletter: March-April 1966

This is an example of one of many SCLC Newsletters printed for public distribution. In this third volume, topics include: Bloody Sunday, Dr. King Thanks Sweden, Man with a Plan, Abernathy Tells Hawaii of Brotherhood, and several others.

Letter from Augusta Hill to MLK

Sunday, October 10, 1965

Augusta Hill, president of the newly formed Negro American Labor Council, requests that Dr. King visit Racine, Wisconsin in an effort to help address the employment discrimination occurring there.

Letter from Juanita Kurtza to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963

Juanita Kurtza sends Dr. King a list of scriptures to encourage him in his work. She also apologizes for her inability to send money.

Letter From Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler

Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler sends their support and best wishes to the S.C.L.C, C.O.R.E, and S.N.C.C for their efforts towards violence, Vietnam, and human dignity.

Schleiermacher & Ritschl

Dr. King writes notes regarding the philosophies of German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl. King states there is a mixture of attraction and repulsion between the two, as Ritschl is repelled by Schleiermacher's mysticism and attracted to his views on Christianity.

Speech at Chicago Freedom Movement Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1966

Dr. King speaks of the urgent need to address issues in the city such as deplorable housing conditions, discrimination in employment, segregation and overcrowded schools. He urges his listeners to commit to fill up the jails if necessary, register every eligible Negro to vote, withhold rent from slumlords, withdraw economic support from companies that don't hire Negroes, and support Negro-owned businesses. He stresses the importance of using nonviolent methods.

Letter from John Moody

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mr. Moody discusses his hopes of creating an event that will demonstrate the phenomenon of Harumbe, with hopes of it becoming a National holiday. The proposed name of this day is "Harumbe", a Swahili term meaning Let's Get Together. Moody suggests May 19, the birthday of Malcolm X, as the date for this event to occur. Additionally, Moody provides an outline for the festivities, and requests that Dr. King contribute his suggestions after reviewing the proposal.

War

Citing two sources concerning war, Dr. King notes the opinions of Dr. Charles W. Mayo and John M. Fletcher. Dr. Mayo believes that it is impossible to abolish war, as "war is part of our human inheritance," while Fletcher takes the opposite view in his book "Human Nature and World Peace."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Dreifuss to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Dreifuss inform Dr. King that his recent broadcast on Face the Nation has reinvigorated their faith in the movement.

Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Program

This document details an amended budget for the SCLC's Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee.

Young Americans Newsletter

This Young Americans newsletter covers topics such as: The Vietnam War, Young Americans for Freedom, and the usage of violence for a good cause.

Letter from Howard R. Neville to MLK

Tuesday, June 29, 1965

Michigan State provost, Howard Neville, tells Dr. King that Dr. Robert Green is available for a one year leave of absence for the Neighborhood Leader Training Program.

Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.

SCLC Fall Conference Agenda

Friday, September 30, 1960

This is a tentative program for the SCLC's General Fall Conference to be held October 11th through the 13th in 1960. The program included such keynote speakers as Kelley Miller Smith, Joseph E. Lowery, and a freedom rally led by Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy and Fred Shuttlesworth.

Note Cards on God

Dr. King's writes on the possibility of finding God from the First Book of Chronicles.

Letter from Congressman Paul H. Todd to MLK

Monday, October 11, 1965

Florida Democratic Congressman Paul Todd explains to Dr. King why he voted against seating five congressman of the Mississippi Freedonm Democratic Party. Todd based his decision on an earlier precedent, which dismissed a previous claim "because it was brought by a party not legally a candidate for the contested seat."

His Attitude Toward Higher Criticism

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Immanuel Kant's book "The Preface to the First Edition.

Letter from Juanita Epps to MLK

Tuesday, March 23, 1965

Juanita Epps sends Dr. King a check on behalf of the People's Community Church of Queens, New York. Epps acknowledges that their church doesn't have a huge congregation but they wanted to make their contribution towards justice and equality.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. D. Bollinger

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Miss McDonald sends Dr. Bollinger an expense statement for Dr. King's appearance in Lincoln, Nebraska.

Adverse Advertisement Regarding MLK

This flyer questions prominent leaders Dr. King and Robert Kennedy.

Homeric Problem

Dr. King briefly outlines the problem surrounding the work of the Greek poet Homer. The note card references the view of German scholar and critic Friedrich August Wolf and documents two primary theories regarding Homeric literature.

MLK's Statement at Prayer Rally in Albany, Georgia

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

After the bombing of a local church, Dr. King delivered this statement attempting to both criticize the actions of the perpetrators and provide a sense of calm to Albany demonstrators.

Employment Testing Disenfranchises Minority Groups

Monday, March 11, 1968

The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights releases a report revealing the frequency and impact of employers' discriminatory hiring procedures. Staff Director of the Commission William L. Taylor emphasizes the improper use of employment testing greatly undermines "the goal of providing equal employment opportunities for minority group members."