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Letter from Alma Opal to Dr. King

Friday, August 19, 1966
Michigan (MI)

Mrs. Alma Opal informs Dr. King that he should use the word "proud," with complete caution. She also sends him a leaflet entitled, "Lawyer Troubles."

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA), Virginia (VA), New York (NY)

This document is a memo updating Dr. King of requests, invitations and current SCLC finances.

Contribution Letter from Dr. and Mrs. Bacon to Dr. King

Friday, February 23, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. and Mrs. Bacon are writing to express their support and concern for the "last chance" SCLC project. Enclosed in the letter is $200 contribution to help further support the initiative.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Mr. Rustin requests that Dr. King assents to being a member of the "Institute's Board of Advisory Directors".

Statement by Dr. Robert W. Spike on the Mississippi Seating Challenge

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Reverend Dr. Robert W. Spike writes a statement concerning a plan to dismiss a seating challenge in the U.S. House of Representatives. Reverend Spikes discusses the political inadequacies concerning the denial of the Mississippi residents right to vote. Following the seating of the delegation, an investigation commenced to ensure the political legitimacy.

God

Dr. King expounds on "the eternality of God" by using the Book of Psalms.

Man

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 17:5 and suggests that “those of us who oppose humanism” might speak against it like Jeremiah did and provide a rational defense of theism.

Letter from Mrs. A. P. Boynton to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963
Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. A.P, Boynton, chairman of the Dallas County Voters League, informs Dr. King of unjust treatment towards colored women employed at Dunn's Rest Home. Due to physical abuse from the rest home's owner Charles E. Dunn, many of the women left. The Dallas County Voters League also requests a sewing machine from Dr. King to assist the women with "gainful employment."

Letter from David Morgan to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

David Morgan writes this letter of condolence to Coretta Scott King following Dr. King's assassination.

Hruska Says Capital...

Washington, D.C.

Nebraska Senator Roman Hruska criticizes the Dr. King-led demonstrations and asserts that the government does not really know what the demonstrator's goals are.

Letter From Joan Daves to Clarence B. Jones

Monday, May 18, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Clarence B. Jones about the carbon of the letter sent to Dr. King regarding an excerpt from "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from David Goodwin to MLK

New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

David Goodwin, a child 16 years of age, is outraged by the racial issues in the United States and hopes to be of assistance during the March on Washington despite his young age.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to the SCLC

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Ralph Abernathy, Vice President and Financial Secretary of the SCLC, submits the semi-annual financial report for the period of July 1, 1967 to December 31, 1967 to the SCLC Board of Directors. He also commends his financial staff members for their good work.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), GERMANY

Theodore Brown writes Dr. King requesting his signature on a telegram to President Johnson from the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa expressing disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and requesting U.S. support for turning over administration to the United Nations.

Letter from Glenn T. Izutsu to MLK

Friday, November 6, 1964
Hawaii (HI)

Mr. Izutsu, President of the Associated Students of the University of Hawaii, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize and recalls a visit by Dr. King earlier in the year.

Letter from William S. Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1963
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

William Thompson invites Dr. King to speak at the National Bar Association's 38th Annual Convention in Chicago, Illinois.

Huntley Thomas Writes MLK About His New Production

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Thomas Huntley tells Dr. King that he is the first in Atlanta to get a copy of his new production and asks for Dr. Kings opinion.

Anonymous Adverse Letter to MLK

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

The author of this letter sends Dr. King a strong message to leave Chicago. According to the sender, Dr. King does nothing but "cause trouble from one place to another."

Darien Seeking Negro Teachers

Thursday, November 26, 1964
Connecticut (CT), New York (NY)

This article discusses the teacher exchange program between New York City Public Schools and Darien, Connecticut. The program calls for African American teachers to teach students in the predominately white town. The superintendent states the purpose of the project is to show the students that African Americans, if given the same opportunity, are just as intelligent as their white counterparts.

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy on House Resolution 7152

Tuesday, October 15, 1963

Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy comments on House Bill 7152, the bill that eventually culminated in the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Kennedy argues that the bill is a "test" to white Americans and that it must "effectively eliminate racial discrimination in voting, education and in employment." He addresses the eleven titles of the bill and describes the differences between the current bill and the version introduced by the president. Kennedy finally asserts that if the bill is not passed, then "the whole nation will be the loser."

Telegram from Mrs. King on Meaning of Christmas

Thursday, December 19, 1968
Florida (FL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mrs. King expresses sadness that the United States is launching a new dimension in its space program, but spends so little on eliminating poverty, hunger, disease, war and racism.

SCLC Action Committee Meeting

Monday, March 11, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to members of the Action Committee informing them of the date, time, and duties required for the meeting.

Telegram from Mrs. King to Canon L. John Collins

Friday, January 3, 1969
London, England, UNITED KINGDOM

Mrs. King confirms with Canon L. John Collins the dates of her visit to England.

MLK Address to Chicago's Peace Parade and Rally

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, FRANCE, CHINA, JAPAN, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King discusses the nation's present-day involvement with Vietnam. The civil rights leader claims that as a nation founded on democratic and revolutionary ideas, the United States has a moral obligation to intervene on behalf of those suffering and dying throughout the world.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. Lamm

Friday, October 30, 1964
GERMANY

Joan Daves corresponds with a German citizen regarding a recent request to submit Dr. King's book Why We Can't Wait to a German publisher.

Knowledge

Dr. King refers to Ecclesiastes 1:18 which says that increased knowledge brings increased sorrow.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Benjamin E. Mays

Monday, May 4, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Wyatt Tee Walker informs Benjamin E. Mays that an advance copy of Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," is being sent in appreciation of Dr. Mays' support.

Citizenship Education Proposal

South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ, Montgomery, AL

SCLC's Citizenship Education Program issues a five year proposal for the period between 1965 and 1970. The proposal outlines previous successful activities since the inception of the program.

Handwritten Notes on Science and Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brightman's views on Science and Religion.

Letter from MLK to Laura Graves

Monday, October 21, 1963
Chicago, IL

Dr. King thanks Laura Graves for her recent letter which presented suggestions and advice regarding the prejudice in the American community. King states, "with persons of good will increasingly speaking on behalf of racial injustice, the day will arrive more quickly."