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"UNITED STATES OF AMERICA"

King's Way Hurts Rights Movement

Mr. White, author of this article, argues that the political fallout from Dr. King's stance on America's involvement in Vietnam hinders the goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Letter from Dr. E. Wolf to MLK

Thursday, April 2, 1964

Professor Dr. E. Wolf, Chairman of the International Peace Bureau, writes Dr. King expressing the bureau's desire to have him as a guess speaker at their annual conference in Norway.

Student Shot in Accident in Hyde Park High

Gerald Patton is listed as being in good condition by Billings hospital following be shot in the right hip by fellow student Ronald Smith. Patrolman Walter Johnson said the shooting occurred in the assembly hall of Hyde Park High School.

Letter from Benjamin Conklin to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

Mr. Conklin writes this letter urging Rev. Abernathy to rethink the decision to proceed with the Peoples March on Washington. He is concerned that with the recent assassination of Dr. King this action will only alienate Congress and the American public. Hence the march could cause more bloodshed.

Letter from Morris A. Morse to Rev. Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Morris Morse sends his condolences regarding the death of Dr. King. Mr. Morse further explains his opposition of the idea of building a two million dollar church in Dr. King's honor, because he believes that the reverend would not want such a memorial when so many people are in need.

Telegram from Margaret Saunders to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1960

Margaret Saunders sends a telegram to encourage Dr. King while he is in jail.

Letter from James Dombrowski to MLK

Saturday, November 13, 1965

A letter to Dr. and Mrs. King, from Mr. James Dombrowski, thanks them for their support and contribution to SCEF.

Letter from MLK to Vincenso Lapiccirella

Thursday, January 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. Lapiccirella for his invitation to participate in a program in Florence, Italy.

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Monday, December 30, 1963

The Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg invites Dr. King to speak at meeting that will be held at the Pennsylvania State Educational Building. Martin Morand, Vice-President of the Council, also includes information about the issues in Harrisburg's black community to show why Dr. King should accept the invitation.

Letter from J. D. Williams to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1966

Professor Williams requests a phone interview with Dr. King concerning the studies of a select group of Honors students at the University of Utah.

List of Negro Inventors

This list of Negro American inventors includes various individuals such as Dr. Daniel Hale Williams, who performed the first successful open heart surgery, and W.A. Lavalette, who invented the printing press.

Letter from E. B. Hathaway to MLK and Fred C. Bennette

Tuesday, October 3, 1967

E. B. Hathaway responds to a letter from Dr. King and Rev. Bennette concerning employment opportunities at the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company's new manufacturing plant in Albany, Georgia. Hathaway explains the company's projected construction timeline and ensures Dr. King and Rev. Bennette that hiring practices will be non-discriminatory.

Letter to MLK from C. Linski

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

This letter from Mr. C. Linski, invites Dr. King to work on the project for a shopping mall in Calumet City IL. The goal would be for the shops to hire 50% Negroes through the "Operation Employment for Negroes".

MLK Address to the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the SCLC

Dr. King, at the Tenth Anniversary Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses numerous civil rights issues the organization is addressing throughout America.

The Crozer Theological Seminary Student Chapel - Order of Service

Friday, January 27, 1950

This order of service outlines the events taken place during student chapel at The Crozier Theological Seminary. The service was guided by presiding student, Fred Eugene Stom, and focused heavily on Christian affirmations and the reciting of the ten commandments.

Telegrams Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Participants of the Selma-Montgomery March send telegrams to defend the integrity of the march against allegations of sexual immorality.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Mr. Jones, on behalf of the Council for Co-operative Action, invites Dr. King to speak at their function in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Letter from Mary Meeks to MLK

Saturday, August 14, 1965

Mrs. Meeks praises Dr. King for his nonviolent approach. She describes Dr. King as a "man of God" and believes that he is also a servant of God.

Community Salute to MLK Nobel Peace Prize Winner

Thursday, December 17, 1964

This program outlines an event to celebrate Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. The event takes place in New York City on December 17, 1964.

Letter From Don Slaiman

Don Slaiman of the AFL-CIO encloses a brochure titled "The Right to Strike and General Welfare." This brochure, which was developed by the Committee on the Church and Economic Life of the National Council of Churches, address problems and proposes solution to the Labor Movement.

Letter from Martin Kessler to MLK

Thursday, November 10, 1966

Martin Kessler sends Dr. King an article by Daniel P. Moynihan entitled "Is There Really an Urban Crisis?" Moynihan addresses issues of the economic and social conditions in America in the interview with Challenge Magazine.

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964

R. Lennox, a principal at Presbyterian College in Montreal, Canada, invites Dr. King to speak on ministry at the college's 100th anniversary convocation address.

At Your Service!

The Washington Office of the Council for Christian Social Action chronicles the events of the organization including various seminars and cooperation with other organizations.

Notecard on the Definition of Time

On this notecard, Dr. King explores the meaning of "Time" according to modern physics and philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books, and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter From Bessie G. White to MLK

Bessie G. White writes to Dr. King, highlighting the strife that she feels Dr. King will continue to go through while fighting for civil rights in the south.

Letter from MLK to Cal David Gleaton

Thursday, December 2, 1965

Dr. King thanks Rev. Cal Gleaton for his letter in support of the work of the SCLC. Dr. King tells Gleaton that the letter was uplifting and that his contribution to the morale and the spirit of the freedom movement is mostly appreciated by the staff of the SCLC.

Letter from Clifford Alexander to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Clifford Alexander, Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, sends Dr. King a report involving discrimination against Jews in the workplace. According to the report, numerous members of the Jewish community face prejudice from receiving management level jobs in the white collar sector.

Anonymous Letter to Paul Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

The anonymous author of this letter addresses a "Paul" Abernathy to speak against the March of the Poor People's Campaign after Dr. King's death. The author makes statements suggesting that the efforts on behalf of Abernathy are forced upon the government through such demonstrations.

Telegram from Committee of Concerned Mothers to MLK

Monday, February 22, 1965

The Committee of Concerned Mothers for Mrs. Malcolm X and Family writes to Dr. King requesting the SCLC to help assist Mrs. Malcolm X and her four children in the wake of her husband's assassination.