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"UNITED STATES OF AMERICA"

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker, executive assistant to Dr. King writes a response letter to Eugene Cook, the Attorney General of Georgia. Walker asks the Attorney General to provide his office with a list of questions that he would like answered. He also informs Cook that he will release the contents of this letter to the news media to make sure their is a level of transparency.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Taban

Dr. King expresses his concern for Mr. Taban's welfare in Kenya after fleeing Sudan.

Letter from The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge to MLK

Friday, February 17, 1967

A member of The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge in Milwaukee informs Dr. King of his study on the Negro voter. The study determined that Mississippi has the most non-registered Negro voters.

Telegram to MLK from Truman B. Douglass

Thursday, November 24, 1966

Truman B. Douglass, the chairman of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM), informs Dr. King that he has appealed to President Johnson for a meeting regarding the funding of CDGM.

Letter from the Committee To Secure Justice for Morton Sobell to MLK

Tuesday, April 10, 1962

Helen Sobell, wife of Morton Sobell and co-chair of the committee trying to free him, requests that Dr. King write a letter supporting the approval of his parole. She includes an attachment explaining the parole process and contact information for the US Board of Parole.

Letter from MLK to John Evarts

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, a specialized agency of the United Nations, contributes to peace and security by promoting international collaboration through education, science, and culture in order to further universal respect for justice, the rule of law, human rights, and fundamental freedoms proclaimed in the UN Charter. Dr. King thanks his contact in France after a successful joint fundraising event.

SCLC Mail Log: January 29, 1968

Monday, January 29, 1968

This document contains a record of received mail for several members of the SCLC Executive Board.

Letter from William T. Murphy to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Mr. Murphy, a representative of the United States Congress, writes to Dr. King to convey his intentions to support the House of Judiciary Committee Voting Rights bill.

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Christianity

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Martin Luther's views on Christianity, accroding to the book, "Concerning Christian Liberty."

Loving Your Enemies

Sunday, November 10, 1957

In this sermon, Dr. King states that "love is the key to the solution of the problems which we confront in the world today." Dr. King notes that this is not a simple task, but it is necessary.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Harold E. Carlson

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend Carlson to thank him for his recent telegram of encouragement and support. Dr. King states, "You may be confident that such reassurance provides us with an additional source of strength." Dr. King also discusses the philosophy of the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Bruce Smith

Tuesday, June 23, 1964

Dr. King responds to Mr. Smith's earlier letter, in which Smith objected to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dr. King recommends his book, "Why We Can't Wait" to Smith and offers his response to Smith's argument against the bill.

Letter from Edward Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 18, 1966

Edward Kennedy thanks Dr. and Mrs. King for their hospitality during the Annual Convention of the SCLC.

Telegram from Dr. L. K. Jackson to President John F. Kennedy

Dr. L. K. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church writes to President Kennedy regarding "barbaric" demonstrations against Negroes in the South.

People In Action: March on Washington

Saturday, August 24, 1968

Dr. King wrote this article for the New York Amsterdam news in anticipation of the March On Washington. He hoped it would be a nonviolent "orderly massing of people." He discusses past meetings and rallies that suffered from low participation due to fear of association with the protest movement. Dr. King encourages supporters to be courageous enough to attend this march.

Letter to Dr. King from Ralph M. Otwell Requesting an Address to the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

Tuesday, March 24, 1964

Mr. Otwell, representing the Chicago Sun-Times, has requested that Dr. King writes an address to be published in the Sunday edition, regarding the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. Additionally, Mr. Otwell assures Dr. King that this will be an opportunity to promote his book, "Why We Can't Wait".

Appeal from the Circuit Court of Cook County

Defendant-Appelant Frank Ditto filed for an appeal against the City of Chicago after feeling he was unconstitutionally denied a trial by jury. Ditto, Dr. King, and others were on trial previously for their demonstrations in the Chicago, Illinois.

Latitudinarianism

Dr. King defines latitudinarianism, a term "applied to a liberal opinion which allows the diversity of opinion."

Letter from Percy A. Blackburn to Ed Clayton

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Percy A. Blackburn refers to a previous letter Alice Bucher, president of S. J. Bucher Ltd. Lucerne sent Ed Clayton, SCLC Director of Public Relations, concerning their book about the History of the American Negro. Blackburn encloses a "resume of the proposed contents of the book." He also informs Mr. Clayton of Mrs. Bucher and her associate's current visit to the US and that they would like to arrange an appointment with Dr. King at his convenience.

Letter from MLK to Reverend George W. Goth

Sunday, October 27, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend George Goth of Metropolitan United Church declining his invitation to make an appearance at his church. Dr. King has engagements for the remainder of the year that hinder him from committing to any further appearances.

Plato's Psychology

Dr. King outlines Plato’s psychology.

Letter from James D. Wyker to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

James D. Wyker writes this letter to Dr. King and encloses his proposal for direct action against the Vietnam War. Wyker questions if 60% of the population really supports President Johnson's actions in Vietnam, implying that many citizens are just neutral and not wanting to fight the status quo.

Letter Regarding MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

This letter from Dad to Frank and Mark commends Dr. Kings use of the 'march' as means to secure a better life for the Negro. The author goes on to say the integration benefits both the Negro and whites in the supply and demand of labor.

Letter from Carey B. Preston to MLK

Friday, August 28, 1964

Carey Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, thanks Dr. King for being the public meeting speaker at their convention.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dr. King shortly after President Kennedy's assassination to urge him to take precautions.

Telegram from MLK to Mr. Sylveter A. Okereke

Friday, August 6, 1965

Dr. King regrettably informs Mr. Okereke that he will be unable to accept his invitation for an event held on August 18, 1965.

More and Faster

Sunday, January 5, 1964

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.

Cities and Dates Suggested For Harry Belafonte's Tour

These notes compile a list of suggested cities and possible dates for Harry Belafonte's tour.

Statement by MLK

Dr. King discusses the backlash received during the protests and demonstrations for civil rights. He asserts that nonviolence is the most successful weapon, and that in order to participate the individual must be bold, brave, and disciplined.

Letter from Curtis Cosby to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965

Curtis Cosby, writing on behalf of the Esquires Club, encourages Dr. King to support attorney Donald Hollowell as the replacement for judge Boyd Sloan in order to place a Negro in a high level federal position.