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Kant Critiques Other Philosophers

Dr. King contemplates Immanuel Kant's critique of other philosophers. Kant finds limitations in the ideologies of Hume, Leibniz, and Locke. He believes Hume and Leibniz to fall short on their understandings of knowledge. Kant further reproaches Hume and Locke as ignorant for viewing the senses as a viable explanation of consciousness.

Telegram from Charles Cogen to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

Charles Cogen, President of the American Federation of Teachers, writes Dr. King a note expressing that there is national shame because Dr. King is in jail for defending constitutional rights. He also informs Dr. King that they are making their outrage known publicly.

Letter from MLK to Robert H. Iwanabe

In this draft letter to Mr. Iwanabe, Dr. King explains his methods, understanding and goals pertaining to the Civil Rights Movement.

Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King makes an address at the "Pilgrimage for Democracy" in Atlanta during the winter of 1963. He opens with the Supreme Courts ruling to cease segregation in schools and how Atlanta served as the "epitome of social progress." He continues to elaborate on how the city needs to continue its desegregation efforts to achieve justice. Dr. King numerically highlights the inadequacies of the integrated schools in Atlanta and expresses the reality of the continuing segregation in the city's public accommodations.

Telegram from Phil Lenud to MLK

Sunday, December 18, 1966
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Phil Lenud sends a telegram to Dr. King expressing that Reverend Andrew Young will telegraph him.

Letter from Lawrence Friedman to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
California (CA)

The former president of the Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation, Lawrence J. Friedman, writes Dr. King to inform him of a letter concerning the Kennedy assassination, which was written on an unauthorized piece of stationery. The letter is dated January 29, 1968, but The Los Angeles Theatre Arts Foundation was dissovled under the laws of the State of California on May 16, 1966. The letter was signed by Donald Freed. Lawrence P. Friedman wishes to make it clear that he had no knowledge of the letter being sent.

Letter from W. C. Dobbins to MLK

Wednesday, May 29, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL

W.C. Dobbins, of the Pensacola Council of Ministers, follows up with Dr. King to request his presence at a mass meeting to be held in either September or October.

Letter from The Charleston Business & Professional Men's Club to Dr. King

Thursday, October 2, 1958
New York, NY

Samuel Baskerville, of the Charleston Business & Professional Men's Club, wrote to Dr. King out of sympathy, for his nearly fatal stabbing at a department store in Harlem. Mr. Baskerville, on behalf of his organization, conveyed their delight in knowing of Dr. King's survival, per various press releases.

Telegram from Mrs. Willie Bass to MLK

Thursday, September 23, 1954
New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

Mrs. Willie M. Bass sent this telegram expressing her hope for Dr. King's speedy recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Letter from Michael J. Gerstley to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963
Illinois (IL), Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA

Michael J. Gerstley desires to continue to legacy of his grandfather's, Dr. Samuel Loebenstein, autograph collection from over 1500 prominent leaders. Dr. Loebenstein's collection is unique because he would request the leaders to sign over a stamp that correlated with their vocation. Mr. Gerstley provides Dr. King with a stamp of George Washington Carver to carry on his grandfather's collection.

Letter from Alice Houghton Sherill to MLK

Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

On behalf of the Detroit Women for Dr. Martin Luther King, Alice Houghton Sherrill thanks Dr. King for the envelopes received from his secretary. Mrs. Sherrill extends her welcome to Dr. King for his upcoming visit to Detroit and offers the group's assistance during his stay.

Letter from MLK to Professor Zeegus

Detroit, MI

Dr. King commends Professor Zeegus for his organization, Heart of Africa, and its mission to "mobilize public support for the struggle of the American Negro in efforts to help achieve freedom and equality."

God

Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's statement that there is no "medium point" as it relates to God.

Unwise and Untimely?

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, New Orleans, LA, New York (NY), Texas (TX), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

This pamphlet from the Fellowship of Reconciliation features a letter written from eight Alabama Clergymen to Dr. King. The Clergymen express their discontent with the movement and Dr. King brings forth a response. The response is later known as one of Dr. King's famous texts, "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." The pamphlet also includes Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech from the 1963 March on Washington.

Letter from Warren R. Austin to MLK

Wednesday, September 17, 1958

In this letter, Mr. Austin, Honorary Chairman of The Committee of One Million, writes to Dr. King and encloses an advanced review copy of the "Black Book on Red China." The book is scheduled to be published soon and was commissioned by the Committee of One Million as an "international public service."

Telegram from Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights to MLK

Thursday, August 9, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights and its executives offer support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Albany jail.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Sidney Anger

Monday, March 25, 1968
New York, NY

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Sidney Anger for his contribution of $100 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King continues to share the current work of the organization and the importance of financial support in order to ensure sustainability.

Letter from Emmitt LaMarr to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967
New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Kentucky (KY)

Emmitt LaMarr writes Dr. King about the status of his proposal to the National Dairy Products Corporation regarding Operation Breadbasket. Although LaMarr does not hold an executive position with the corporation, he assures Dr. King his efforts are not in vain.

Letter form Gloria Kenny to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967
New York (NY)

Gloria Kenny praises Dr. King and the SCLC for sending a small group of individuals to the Agape Mass at MaryMount College. She also commends him on his efforts to speak out against the Vietnam War.

Letter from Monica Wilson to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA, Geneva, Switzerland

Monica Wilson reaches out to Dr. King on behalf of a student organization at the University of Cape Town to obtain a response to their invitation asking Dr. King to deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture.

Letter from Robert Johnson to MLK

New York (NY)

The author requests Dr. King to encourage black people to put away their wickedness so the Lord can take care of them.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, September 20, 1963
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA

W. David Angus, Secretary of the Canadian Club of Montreal, extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at an upcoming luncheon. He concludes by offering to cover any expenses that Dr. King may accumulate if he were to accept the invitation.

My Dream: Julian Bond and the Constitution by MLK

Saturday, January 22, 1966
New York, NY, Georgia (GA), MEXICO, VIETNAM

Dr. King elaborates on the "hypocritical" and "high-handed injustice" executed by the United States and their refusal to seat Julian Bond for the Georgia State Legislature. Abraham Lincoln is highlighted for his exercise of the democratic right in his stance against Congress involving the United States war with Mexico. Dr. King asserts the irony in the method of Mr. Bond's colleagues and critics whom either indirectly or directly supported racial segregation. Dr.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Saturday, February 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL

In Dr. King's article, The Danger of a Little Progress, he discusses the work of the SCLC and SNCC in correlation to statistics regarding integrated housing and schools, as well as discrimination in employment. Dr. King concludes that there has been little progress among blacks in Atlanta statistically.

Appeal from Wyatt Tee Walker for Albany Support

Wednesday, July 25, 1962
Albany, GA

Following the arrests of Dr. King and three others who held a prayer vigil at the Albany, Georgia City Hall, Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker issues this appeal for support from those active in the civil rights movement. He calls for telegrams to be sent to federal, state, and local officials, prayer vigils, and the wearing of black armbands.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves provides the figures for royalties and advances of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from JohnFischer to MLK Regarding an Article in Harper's Magazine

Wednesday, September 26, 1962
New York (NY), Albany, GA

John Fischer of Harpers Magazine informs Dr. King that the Albany Georgia article will not be published in the upcoming edition.

Letter from Rev. Milton Reid to MLK

Tuesday, January 28, 1964
Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC)

Rev. Milton Reid invites Dr. King to Petersburg, Virginia to be the speaker at the 190th Anniversary of the First Baptist Church. Rev. Reid mentions to Dr. King that the church holds historical significance because meetings about abolishing slavery were held at the church by Nat Turner and John Brown. Reid asks Dr. King to suggest another speaker if he is unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from James E. Orange to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Cleveland, OH

Rev. Andrew Young advises Rev. James Orange to contact Dr. King about a salary increase. As a member of the SCLC, Rev. Orange is assigned a project in Philadelphia and desires to avoid financial issues.

More and Faster

Sunday, January 5, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.