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"UNITED STATES OF AMERICA"

Letter from Edward P. Gottlieb to Editor, New York Times

Thursday, November 23, 1967

Edward P. Gottlieb writes to the Editor of the New York Times expressing his concern on racial pride. He begins by stating that racial pride is to be deplored and discouraged. Gettlieb concludes with the notion that an African American will feel free only after he is able to explore his own history and culture so he may take from it what he wants for his personal enhancement.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Shapiro

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Mr. Shapiro's song, "The Most Important People." Dr. King states that the song is an "admirable contribution to the furtherance of the Freedom Movement."

Telegram from Terrence Hallinan to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

Mr. Hallinan requests Dr. King's assistance in aiding a service member undergoing a "court martial for refusal to go to Vietnam."

Letter from Carey Preston to Dora McDonald

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Mrs. Carey B. Preston confirms the details of Dr. King's trip to Philadelphia to speak at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Convention.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Velma B. Hall

Wednesday, October 12, 1960

Mrs. King addressed this correspondence to Velma Hall, in 1960. In this document, Mrs. King extended apologies for the delay in sending her biographical information.

Telegram from Chaim Potok to Andrew J. Young

Tuesday, May 11, 1965

Reverend Andrew J. Young informs Rabbi Chaim Potok that his heavy involvement in the South will not permit him to engage in any writing.

Letter from Wilma Fondel to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Wilma Fondel expresses interest in attending Dr. King's pilgrimage to Israel.

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

Tuesday, December 17, 1963

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

Note from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Harry and Julie Belafonte congratulate Dr. King on receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Harry Belafonte is an American entertainer and social activist.

Greek Philosophy Subject Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King points to the aim of Greek Philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

The Massachusetts Review: A Legacy of Creative Protest

Friday, September 7, 1962

Dr. King writes of the influence of Henry David Thoreau's essay on the duty of civil disobedience in forming his belief that non-cooperation with evil is a moral obligation. He cites lunch-counter sit-ins, freedom rides, and the bus boycott as evidence that Thoreau’s thinking is still alive. This article appeared in a special 1962 issue of The Massachusetts Review commemorating the centennial of Thoreau’s death.

Scripps Howard: Dr. King Asks LBJ to Do As Hero FDR Did

Monday, January 15, 1968

Tom Talburt reports in this article that Dr. King urged President Johnson to create jobs and provide for the disadvantaged in order to prevent another summer of riots, such as the Los Angeles Watts Riots of 1965.

Letter from David Caputo to MLK

Saturday, June 22, 1963

David Caputo extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at Miami University. Mr. Captuo requests that Dr. King responds in a timely manner so that honorarium can be negotiated.

Letter from Ernest Evans to MLK about Help

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

Ernest Evans is writing to Dr. King asking him to come by his home while he is visiting Chicago. Evans discusses the problems of his living conditions and the increase in the cost of living. He hopes that Dr. King will be able to bring about positive change for the community.

Letter from Chas. W. Bailey to MLK

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Chas. Bailey comments on representative Adam Clayton Powell, asserting that he cannot call himself a Christian and that he only escaped investigation because of his race. Bailey also lectures Dr. King for defending Powell.

Immortality

Dr. King writes a quote from Goethe from Johann Peter Eckermann's "Conversations of Goethe."

Workers Defense League Board Meeting Announcement

This is an invitation to the annual national executive board meeting of the Workers Defense League in New York City. The agenda is to discuss civil rights, how to defend the rights of conscientious objectors, workers and welfare recipients, political asylum, and other topics.

Letter from Adlai E. Stevenson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963

US Ambassador to the United Nations Adlai Stevenson, informs Dr. King that they will have to postpone their meeting due to a U.N. Security Council meeting that Mr. Stevenson has to preside over.

Notes - Dr. King's Rough Draft of a Response to Mr. Walter Harding

This document is a rough draft of Dr. King's thank-you letter to Mr. Harding for a book he dedicated in part to Dr. King.

Letter from William Kivi to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

William Kivi references a statement made by Dr. King at the SCLC convention pertaining to everyone having a "guaranteed income." Kivi's belief is that Republican officials in the state of California continue to chisel away at federal programs designed to give the poor access to health care and other government aid. His recommendation to Dr. King as a solution would be a "restructured national civil service."

Letter from Robert Beverly to Ralph David Abernathy

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

Robert Beverly of the City Employees Union Local 237 writes to Dr. Abernathy informing him of the enclosed May edition of the union's newspaper.

Mysticism

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking’s “The Meaning of God in Human Experience.”

I Have Decided to Start With Myself

Monday, August 14, 1967

This dictation of the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet includes speeches given by Dr. King, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, and Andrew Young. The keynote address given by Mr. Sidney Poitier concluded the evening, along with a presentation of an award.

What is Man?

Sunday, January 12, 1958

Citing views from historical and contemporary figures, Dr. King asserts that the definition of "man" lies somewhere between God and an animal. Dr. King contends that, although man is limited by time and space, humans are not animals, because they have the capacity for rational thought. However, the central theme that Dr. King argues is that humanity is inherently evil and must constantly strive for high moral standards.

Christology

Dr. King references the concept of Christology by quoting German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Beyond Condemnation

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Beyond Condemnation." He references the biblical story about a woman condemned to death by the Pharisees for adultery. Jesus commands "the person without sin to cast the first stone" as a lesson that all sins are equal and that no one should judge the flaws of others.

The Martin Luther King Fund

Friday, April 9, 1965

The Toronto Chapter of the Martin Luther King Fund organization commends Dr. King for his progessive actions to combat racial injusitices in the United States. The chapter contributes to Dr. King's organization for their active participation in the betterment of Selma, Alabama. In support of an official MLK day in Toronto, the organization invites Dr. King to speak.

Letter from Dolores H. Autuore to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967

Mrs. Autuore encloses some checks that were misplaced temporarily while offering her gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to Pine Island.

Letter from MLK to Raymond Beard

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King thanks Raymond Beard for his statement on peace and Christianity. He believes that the Fellowship of Reconciliation can distribute Beard's message to fellow clergyman around the country. In Dr. King's view, "...we must embark upon positive programs of international aid and amity to strenghten the bonds of world community and to eliminate the conditions which historically have led nations to start wars."

Letter from Kerstin Lindblom to the SCLC

Thursday, September 8, 1966

A Student from Sweden offers to come to America to work for the SCLC. Her letter describes all the ways she wishes to help.