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"UZBEKISTAN"

Clement of Alexandria

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on Clement of Alexandria.

Letter from MLK to Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Connecticut (CT), Hartford, CT

Dr. King commends the Westminster Presbyterian Church and the Hartford Meeting of Friends for pursuing an initiative to buy a home in an all white section of Hartford, Connecticut. He proudly supports the project and extends his best wishes.

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

Friday, July 28, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Cambridge, MA

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."

Letter from Lewis W. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1960
Alabama (AL)

Lewis W. Jones worries about Dr. King because of the recent turmoil he has faced. He hopes that the struggles King has faced recently does not undermine his position in the movement.

Memo from Edwin Berry and Melville Hosch to Freedom Government Conference Members

Wednesday, March 8, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

The United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare details the purpose of the Freedom-Government Conference and outlines the objectives for the scheduled meetings in the spring.

Letter from E. H. Williams to MLK

California (CA)

E. H. Williams writes to tell Dr. King of the great job he is doing speaking out on the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack Delano

Tuesday, July 6, 1965
PUERTO RICO

Dr. King accepts Mr. Delano's invitation to appear for an hour on WIPR-TV during his visit to Puerto Rico.

Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Program

This document details an amended budget for the SCLC's Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee.

The Sentinel: Sweetheart's Korner

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Hattie Bea Carney expresses her views and feelings on the moral trend of young people. Throughout the article, Ms. Carney offers alternative, as well as, parental advice for Christian parents.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

GHANA, ISRAEL

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

Conference on Social Statistics Resolutions

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ)

This document lists a number of solutions for improving the acknowledgement of minorities in America. These solutions were drafted during the Conference on Social Statistics held in Washington D.C.

Letter from Clara Sturges Johnson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963
California (CA)

Ms. Johnson informs Dr. King of her efforts promoting the passing of the "Kennedy Civil Rights Memorial Act." The United States Congress would go on to pass this act in 1964.

The State of Alabama - Equal Administration of Justice

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This document addresses issues of discrimination in the South, particularly in Alabama, by state and federal institutions since the Republican Compromise of 1877. The document outlines a response to the many forms of discrimination occurring.

MLK's Remarks to Swedish Audience

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Los Angeles, CA, SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden, Washington, D.C., California (CA)

Dr. King delivers a speech in Stockholm, Sweden applauding the nation's commitment and support of racial justice in America. King further articulates his belief that despite several social ills people will "be able to sing together in the not too distant future."

Letter from Douglas Mosley and Dwight Campbell to MLK

Monday, August 24, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Delaware (DE), New Jersey (NJ), Maryland (MD)

The Philadelphia District of The Methodist Youth Fellowship asks Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at an upcoming freedom rally.

Letter from William R. Rice to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

William Rice, editorial director for WLS radio in Chicago, offers Dr. King suggestions for Operation Dropout. Also enclosed in the letter is a statement on the reasons to stay in school.

Letter from MLK to Rev. C. V. Willis

Tuesday, February 20, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Coatesville, Pennsylvania in support of the NAACP. He explains that his recent commitment to the SCLC Board to tour the South for a voter registration campaign prevents him from accepting any additional speaking engagements.

Transformed Noncomformist

Friday, November 1, 1957

Dr. King delivered this sermon in November 1957 while serving as the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. In the sermon, Dr. King discusses the Christian dilemma of being "a citizen of two worlds: the world of time and the world of eternity." He situates the experience of black people in America within this dichotomy, and asserts that Christians must not conform to the world of mass opinion when it lacks Christian virtue, but must assume nonconformity.

Biography of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr

Stockbridge, GA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This document presents a biographical sketch of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Letter from W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

W. P. Buckwalter, Jr. writes the SCLC enclosing a check from various church groups to be used toward Selma expenses.

Holiday Greetings to You and Yours!

Frances Pauley inquires about the "white Santa Claus" and seeks the day when all children are equal.

Governor Rockefeller Confirms Invitation to Speak at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
New York, NY

This letter dated September 2, 1965, was sent to Dr. King from Margaret Fowler, calendar Secretary to Gov. Rockefeller. In this letter Ms. Fowler confirms to Dr. King that the governor will be able to speak at the Men's Day Observance at Ebenezer Baptist Church on October 17, 1965.

We Shall Overcome Sketch

Charlie Cheese Carson's created this sketch which illustrates many notable civil rights leaders as chess pieces.

Letter from Richard Beal to MLK

Saturday, January 21, 1967
Florida (FL)

Mr. Beal informs Dr. King that he believes the best way for African Americans to gain the support of Caucasian Americans is for them to earn their respect.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

Letter from Arthur R. Mann to Dora McDonald

Monday, November 1, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Arthur Mann thanks Dora McDonald for her hospitality during a recent visit to Atlanta by New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller.

Letter from Wesley Hotchkiss to Associates of the Citizen Education Project

Wednesday, September 7, 1966
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Mr. Hotchkiss, the General Secretary of the AMA and primary UCBHM representative for the CEP, writes employees to clear up confusion regarding the administrative structure of the CEP. He informs employees that the the CEP is administered by the UCBHM stating, "When staff are confused about their employer it usually means they are confused about their objectives." The organization's most important objective, Mr. Hotchkiss asserts, is to mobilize individuals who have been trained under the CEP to focus the skills they have acquired on community development.

Letter from Rosa A. King to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA)

Rosa King invites Dr. King to be a speaker at Central Baptist Church's 14th Annual Friends Day in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, June 11, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes to President John F. Kennedy about the President's speech to the nation. Dr. King writes that he found the speech to be most eloquent and unequivocal.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, April 7, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Randolph addresses his concerns with current events that could potentially harm the Civil Rights Movement. His list of developments includes Malcolm X's promotion of rifle clubs, the use of propaganda tactics to separate white people from the Civil Rights Movement, the increasing totalitarian influence on protest groups in northern cities and demagogic leadership that creates confusion and frustration. Mr. Randolph requests a meeting to discuss how to address these issues.