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"UZBEKISTAN"

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Letter from E. B. Hathaway to MLK and Fred C. Bennette

Tuesday, October 3, 1967

E. B. Hathaway responds to a letter from Dr. King and Rev. Bennette concerning employment opportunities at the Firestone Tire and Rubber Company's new manufacturing plant in Albany, Georgia. Hathaway explains the company's projected construction timeline and ensures Dr. King and Rev. Bennette that hiring practices will be non-discriminatory.

Thank You Letter from Dr. King to Eartha Kitt

Tuesday, December 18, 1962

In this letter, Dr. King is expressing his deep apprecitation to Eartha Kitt for her contribution to the Southern Chrisitan Leadership Conference.

Letter from Reverend C. William Billingslea to MLK

Tuesday, July 24, 1962

Reverend C. William Billingslea notifies Dr. King that the Northern Christian Leadership Conference wants to assist the movement through mass rallies, speeches, fund-raising, etc. Reverend Billingslea also asks Dr. King to provide a Freedom Fighter to come and speak to the organization.

Letter from Ernest C. Copper to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Ernest Cooper, Executive Director of the Urban League of Cleveland, seeks a meeting with Dr. King to discuss how the two agencies can cooperate on the tentative Cleveland program announced by SCLC.

The Wells Newsletter: January 1964

Tuesday, October 15, 1963

This publication, to which Dr. King subscribed, discusses global issues such as Russian Communism, Marxism, the status of the United States economy, and Negroes in college.

God, Man, Sin, and Knowledge

Presented here is a series of notecards that defines an array of topics relating to philosophical and theological perspectives.

Letter from MLK to Elodia Trevino

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Dr. King thanks Elodia Trevino for her support of the Freedom Movement and calls her letter a "contribution to the morale and spirit" of the movement.

Letter from Steve Rubicz to MLK

Thursday, September 20, 1962

Steve Rubicz, of the Student Peace Union at the University of Washington, invites Dr. King to join a "speakers circuit" that will travel to a number of colleges in the Pacific Northwest.

On Being a Good Neighbor

Dr. King tells the Biblical story of the "Good Samaritan on the Road to Jericho," in which a traveler has been robbed, beaten and left for dead. Dr. King connects this story to the Declaration of Independence and offers an analysis of the modern era. Following the example of the "Good Samaritan," he encourages looking beyond "race, religion and nationality" to help those wounded by injustices.

Telegram from Rev. Ralph Abernathy to President Johnson

Wednesday, December 22, 1965

Rev. Abernathy urges President Johnson to meet with a group of poverty-stricken people from Syracuse, New York at Johnson's Texas White House.

Sin

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 1:18-20 indicates that sacrifices are not needed to be saved from sin; willingness and obedience are the way to be saved.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays

Thursday, December 19, 1963

In this letter to Dr. Mays, Dr. King mentions a letter of recommendation written on the behalf of William Herbert Gray Jr.

Letter from Maude Ballou to MLK

Friday, September 26, 1958

Maude Ballou, Dr. King's personal secretary at the Montgomery Improvement Association, writes to Dr. King during his recovery at Harlem Hospital in New York, after being stabbed a few days before. Ms. Ballou provides Dr. King a detailed report of pending correspondences awaiting his attention.

Negative Letters to the Editor about MLK

In these newspaper clippings, four people criticize Dr. King and the SCLC Chicago Campaign of 1966.

Telegram from Lavinia Underwood to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965

Lavinia Underwood writes Dr. King to discourage the possibility of a march that could strain relationships with white people.

Newsweek: Road to Selma - Hope & Death

Newsweek issues this synopsis of the 1965 voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. The article illustrates the details surrounding the brutal racial murder of Viola Liuzzo, delving into the federal investigation of Mrs. Liuzzo's murder and its impact on the future passage of the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Telgram From Denmark to Dr.King

Thursday, October 15, 1964

A representative of the Danish Jewish Community offers Dr. King the "Ben Adam Honorary Award". He invites Dr. King to the event held December 5th, 1964.

MLK Handwritten Signature

This note contains handwriting that says "Best Wishes-Martin Luther King, Jr."

Letter from Paul R. Trumpler to MLK

Friday, May 25, 1962

Paul Trumpler writes Dr. King expressing how he and his wife are pleased to have the chance to support Dr. King's work. They believe in Dr. King's ideas regarding racial issues and solutions. Trumpler encloses a check written out to Dr. King so he can use the money as he designate.

The Museum of Negro History and Art 1967 Calendar

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Distributed by the Museum of Negro History and Art, this calendar was used by Coretta Scott King and contains biographies of famous African American musicians. Mrs. King studied at the New England Conservatory to be an opera singer. On this calendar, she also marked April 27th as "my birthday."

Sentinel: "King's Book Refutes Black Power"

Thursday, June 22, 1967

This document is a newspaper clipping from the Los Angeles Sentinel,l giving a review of Dr. King's book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community. Headlined under the title, "King's Book Refutes Black Power", the book review places special emphasis on Dr. King's objection of black power as a slogan. In his book, Dr. King informed his readers that the paths of black and white individuals intersected towards equality and black power totally killed that process.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights Address by MLK

Thursday, May 17, 1962

Dr. King speaks at a luncheon launching the Gandhi Society on May 17, 1962, citing the great significance of the day: the anniversary of the US Supreme Court decision declaring school segregation unconstitutional, the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and the centennial of the death of Henry David Thoreau, whose essay on civil disobedience influenced Gandhi. He announces that earlier that day he sent President Kennedy a document seeking an executive order proclaiming all forms of segregation to be a violation of the US Constitution.

Letter from SNCC Chairman John Lewis to William Shawn

Thursday, April 22, 1965

John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, responds to a recent article in "The New Yorker." He provides a number of corrections to the article and also explains who should be considered official spokespersons for SNCC.

An Invitation to a Dedication by Olivet and Her Friends

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Olivet Institutional Baptist Church sponsors a month long dedication to the opening of the O. M. Hoover Christian Community Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Dr. King is listed as a participant in the dedication.

Notre Dame Law School Library Letter to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

Miss Boller, the law school library assistant of Notre Dame, inquires about a recent speech by Dr. King concerning his perspective on the United States and violence.

SCLC Press Release, Poor People's Campaign

Monday, March 4, 1968

In this press release intended for the American public and media outlets, Dr. King argues that the country is "splitting into two hostile societies and the chief destructive cutting force is white racism." The SCLC President asserts that the federal government fails to eradicate social ills, like poverty, unless it is "confronted directly and massively." Henceforth, the nonviolent April 1968 Poor People's Campaign is intended to serve as the "final victory over racism and poverty."

Newsletter from The Knights of the Confederacy

The Knights of the Confederacy, a student organization that promoted segregation in public schools, used this flyer to recruit students who were aligned with their goal of protecting "white rights."

Letter to Dr. King from Ralph M. Otwell Requesting an Address to the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education

Tuesday, March 24, 1964

Mr. Otwell, representing the Chicago Sun-Times, has requested that Dr. King writes an address to be published in the Sunday edition, regarding the 10th Anniversary of Brown v. Board of Education. Additionally, Mr. Otwell assures Dr. King that this will be an opportunity to promote his book, "Why We Can't Wait".

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.