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"UZBEKISTAN"

MLK's Statement on Birmingham Jails

Monday, May 6, 1963

During a broadcast, Dr. King states that the witness and determination of those incarcerated in Birmingham, will break down the barriers of segregation.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Jaggart to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

Mr and Mrs. C. Jaggart express how much they enjoyed one of Dr. King's messages.

Letter from Andrew Hobart to MLK

Tuesday, November 29, 1966

In this letter, dated 11/29/66, Mr. Andrew Hobart, President of Ministers Life and Casualty Union informs Dr. King that his application for reinstatement has been accepted, and cautions a lapsed contract may result in a loss or reduction of benefits.

King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed

Monday, March 25, 1963

This press release entitled, "King Says Voice of White Moderate Needed," highlights Dr. King's challenge to moderate white southerners to become more vocal against racial injustices.

New Politics Convention. Chicago, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter of Support to MLK While In Jail

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

Silas Townsend wrote this letter to Dr. King upon his jailing in Birmingham in 1967. Townsend writes how appropriate it is that Dr. King is jailed on All Saints Day.

Letter From Birmingham City Jail

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

Dr. King's famous "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a response to a statement written by several Alabama Clergymen. In that statement, the Clergymen assert that Dr. King's methods are both "unwise and untimely." They brand him an "outside agitator" who should not be advocating the breaking of the law. Dr. King responds with this Letter and politely references Biblical, Classical and early American figures to counter the arguments of the Clergymen.

The Bible

Dr. King records notes regarding Protestant Orthodoxy and its great error in dealing with the Bible.

Letter from Robert Balkind to Rev. Abernathy about NAACP

Monday, April 15, 1968

This letter, written by the CEO of Hampton Manufacturing Co., references an attached letter for the NAACP.

Letter from P. M. Smith to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

P. M. Smith writes Dora McDonald thanking her on Dr. Ruden's behalf for a letter regarding Dr. King's visit to Amsterdam. Miss Smith references a previous correspondence from Dr. Ruden's informing Miss McDonald of the schedule for Dr. King's visit.

Letter from Miles W. Jackson to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967

The Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Pacific Northwest Conference invites Dr. King to speak at the 1968 conference dinner. The conference will be held at the Methodist Church and will present civil rights spokesman Bishop Everett W. Palmer.

Along This Way: The Violence of Poverty

Saturday, January 1, 1966

In his regular column of the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the rate of unemployment among Negroes. He states that 2/3 of all Negro families live in poverty. Dr. King argues that the administration needs to carry out the mandate of the Unemployment Act of 1945 and stimulate employment.

Letter from Jacques Muhlethaler to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

The EIP, an association which seeks to establish the greatest number of schools in the world, asks Dr. King to become a member of their Board of Patrons.

Letter from Burton Cain to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Burton Caine informs Dr. King of the dilemma with the American Jewish liberal's continuation in the Civil Rights Movement. Caine recounts repeated instances of Negroes singling out Jews in verbal attacks. He emphasizes this irony given that Jews have been active supporters of the Civil Rights Movement. Unsure if Dr. King stands in solidarity with anti-Semitic views, Caine asks Dr. King to issue a statement to clarify his beliefs.

Letter from MLK to Mildred Lynch

Monday, December 11, 1967

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Mildred Lynch's letter inviting him to visit Toronto. He expresses his appreciation but regretfully declines the invitation due to the future plans of the SCLC.

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.

Job

Dr. King reflects on the purpose of suffering in the Book of Job and how Job deals with it.

Letter from John A. McDermott Copied to Al Raby and MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes to Al Raby and Dr. King. Mr. McDermott describes the Council's involvement with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Mr. McDermott also expresses his appreciation for Mr. Raby and Dr. King's support in the fight for fair housing legislation in Chicago. McDermott goes on to describe the Movement struggle with the controversial Atomic Energy Commission project in Weston, Illinois.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles E. Boddie

Friday, February 17, 1961

Dora McDonald informs Charles Boddie that Dr. King cannot accept any speaking engagements for his desired date because he has previously committed to having lunch with some students and faculty.

Eisenhower - Views on the Racial Question

Dr. King notes General Dwight D. Eisenhower's justification of racial segregation during Eisenhower's 1948 testimony before a Senate subcommittee.

Individualization and Participation

Dr. King records notes on the individualization and participation of man.

The Dilemma of The Negro

Saturday, January 29, 1966

Dr. King provides an outlook on the social and political plight of the contemporary Negro. He claims "The challenge is the fact that society expects, indeed demands, that the Negro be as productive, as resourceful, as skillful and as responsible as his white brother who is not handicapped by oppression". He urges Negro citizens to capitalize on current opportunities for advancement. "The negro must not wait until the dawn of absolute emancipation...".

Letter of invitation from Rabbi Albert A. Goldman to MLK

Thursday, May 20, 1965

Goldman invites Dr. King to be the guest speaker for the Community Thanksgiving Service at The Isaac M. Wise temple in Ohio.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

Sunday, March 31, 1968

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

"Open Hearings Bill Offered in House"

This article addresses political concerns in Jackson, Mississippi, as introduced by John Perkins and Ralph Sowell Jr. The "freedom of information" act will allow the public to be active and aware of political actions. Any violation of this act will result in a penalty for the individual or organization.

Southern Christian Leadership Resolutions

Friday, June 30, 1967

Chauncey Eskridge sends Andrew Young resolutions related to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Mr. Eskridge explains that an examination into the foundation's tax exempt status by the IRS prompted his letter.

The Wells Newsletter: January 1964

Tuesday, October 15, 1963

This publication, to which Dr. King subscribed, discusses global issues such as Russian Communism, Marxism, the status of the United States economy, and Negroes in college.

Letter from Dr. Alex Hershaft to MLK

Saturday, June 24, 1967

Dr. Alex Hershaft writes to Dr. King to tell him he is happy to make a donation now that Dr. King has aligned himself against the war in Vietnam. Rather than having to choose between donating to civil rights or anti-war causes, Dr. Hershaft can donate to Dr. King and accomplish both.

Letter from Armour G. McDaniel to MLK

Monday, March 20, 1967

Armour G. McDaniel, Director of the Small Business Development Center, writes Dr. King to alert him that government assistance to low-income individuals is at risk. Mr. McDaniel describes the Small Business Administration's initiative to assist poor Negroes and states that since the Economic Opportunity Act of 1966 was amended, not a single loan has been granted in Atlantic or Cape May Counties by the SBA.