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"UZBEKISTAN"

Letter from Ruth H. Bunche to MLK

Saturday, September 9, 1967

Mrs. Ruth H. Bunche appeals to Dr. King for his financial support for Inwood House, a support system for unmarried mothers. Enclosed is a brochure describing the program and its services.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Spicher

Dr. King informs Mrs. Spicher that he is unable to assist her with the issues from her previous letter due to limited resources.

Telegram from Reinhold Niebuhr to MLK

Friday, March 19, 1965

Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr regrets that a stroke prevents him from accepting Dr. King's invitation to participate in the Selma-to-Montgomery March and hopes there will be "massive" support.

Intervention Anyone? A New Look at Social Action

Dr. Hans B. C. Spiegel wrote this piece to describe the different components of social action. Dr. Spiegel, the Director of the Center for Community Tensions at Springfield College, uses the Montgomery and Albany Movements as examples of various levels of social intervention. He also references the SCLC, the Fair Employment Practices Commission, and the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity.

Letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes Stewart

Saturday, December 17, 1966

This document is a letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes S. Stewart pertaining to Mr. Johnson's objection to participating in the Armed Forces physical examination due to his belief that "there is a better way to solve conflicting problems that beset men".

Letter from Robert S. Swann to MLK

Monday, February 5, 1968

This letter to Dr. King accompanies the enclosure of a proposal regarding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Co-operative Association. Robert Swann hopes that this proposal can be discussed at the upcoming SCLC meeting in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Sam Aluko to MLK

Wednesday, November 16, 1966

Sam Aluko writes Dr. King requesting him to contribute to the National Relief Fund, which assists displaced people in Nigeria.

Dr. King's Children Viewing his Body for First Time at the Funeral, April, 1968

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Culbert G. Rutenber to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Professor Rutenber, of Andover Newton Theological School, writes Dr. King on behalf of Lovic Dean, an African American minister, who has requested Dr. King send him "the best books" to build a library on the subject of pacifism.

Letter from a Disillusioned Supporter to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

An anonymous author, who identifies himself as a "white Jew," explains his decision to withdraw financial support from Negro organizations and causes. The reasons for his lack of support include the death of two Jews in Philadelphia, who died aiding the Negro cause, and the rioting in cities.

Letter from H. Carl Moultrie to MLK

Saturday, January 25, 1964

H. Carl Moultrie invites Dr. King or another representative to participate in a panel discussion as a part of the Omega Psi Phi Fraternity's Annual Grand Conclave. Moultrie also provides brief information about the fraternity.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program Brochure

This brochure, which describes the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Citizenship Education Program, states the purpose of the program and also explains how the community can "prepare for first-class citizenship." Included is a brief article by Dr. King entitled "What Makes A First Class Citizen." In the article, Dr. King lists characteristics that first class citizens possess, such as literacy, participation in the political process and an understanding of the Constitution.

New York Amsterdam News: White-On-White Darien's Open Door

Saturday, December 12, 1964

In this editorial Ms. Gertrude Wilson highlights a teacher exchange program in an affluent White community. This particular program aims to enrich the lives of students by integrating a diverse representation of professionals.

94:17 General Correspondence 1966(B)

Thursday, April 21, 1966

Mrs. Burke, a representative of the Wisconsin Council of Teachers of English, requests permission to reprint several exerts from the "I Have a Dream" address. The material will be included in the Johnson publication, entitled "The Day They Marched".

Letter from Hester DeLacy to MLK

Hester De Lacy contributes to the SCLC and expresses an urgent need for written copies of Dr. King's speeches. Mr. De Lacy informs Dr. King that he would prefer a copy of a speech delivered to a large and small audience in both the North and South of the country.

Letter from June A. Williams

June A. Williams encloses a copy of the November - December, 1966 American Veterans Committee Bulletin which carries a summary report of the recent AVC National Conference of the Draft.

MLK Statement Before the Credentials Committee of the DNC

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King addresses the Democratic National Committee urging them to stand up against the inequities that prevent Negro participation in the political process in the state of Mississippi.

Letter from Rev. J. Edward Lantz to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Rev. Lantz, Executive Director of the Southern Office of the National Council of the Churches of Christ, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from William Welsh to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

William Welsh objects to Cassius Clay's (Muhammad Ali) rejection to enter the draft for the Vietnam War. Mr. Welsh asks that if Dr. King agrees with this notion, he should denounce Mr. Clay publicly.

Letter from Stan Brooks to MLK

Monday, June 1, 1964

Stan Brooks, of Wins Radio 1010, writes Dr. King to express his gratitude and enjoyment concerning Dr. King's appearance on a recent broadcast.

Vietnam Peace Parade Flyer

This flyer, issued by the National Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, advertises to New Yorkers to head to D.C. for an anti-war demonstration on October 21st and 22nd. Calling for citizens to 'Confront the Warmakers in Washington,' this flyer features a young boy with a sign reading "Lyndon - I'm too young to die."

SCLC Board Members

This document lists the SCLC's executive board of 53 members.

Integration Details in Wilcox County

Thursday, December 22, 1966

On September 23, 1966, Wilcox County School in Alabama was integrated. However, the amount of "physical acts" and "extreme brutality" directed towards the Negro students was so great that the parents of the students prohibited their children from attending just a few months later. In this report, Robert L. Green, the Education Consultant to the SCLC, outlines the details of this event to Mr. John Doar of the U.S. Justice Department. He tells Mr.

Telegram from Jacob K. Javits to MLK

Amidst the confusion of varying interpretations, Senator Jacob K. Javits asks Dr. King to share his interpretation of the term "black power," so that it can serve as a guide to others.

Adverse Message from Dr. Douglas of Sarasota, FL

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

This message from Dr. Douglas was given over the telephone #525-1717 in Springfield, Illinois. Douglas discusses his beliefs on racism and communism in regards to Dr. King. He discusses how communist are the followers of Dr. King, and also how the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to King in order to cause a "communist world revolution." Bayard Rustin is described by Douglas as a "pervert, jail bird" close associate of Dr. King.

William E. Channing

Dr. King references theologian William E. Channing regarding his views on "Unitarian Christianity."

Letter From Dr. Fred Lange - Nielsen to MLK

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Dr. Fred Lange - Nielson writes Dr. King informing him of a recent appeal that was sent to several Norwegian Bishops. He also encloses a copy of an official translated 'Manifesto'.

Notes on Generational Questions

The document, shown here, was briefly handwritten by Dr. King. Some of the writing in the document says, "One of the most important questions raised in any generation is the question.........." The remaining content of the document is unwritten.

Letter to Mrs. King from Patricia Pleas

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter of condolence originates from East Orange, NJ, and is addressed to Mrs. King. The letter was written the day, following Dr. King's assassination, and its receipt stamp date would suggest the vast volume of mail, in the aftermath of his death.

Letter from Sympathizer to MLK

Writing under a pseudonym, the author suggests that the world is separate because that is the way that God intended it to be. The author pulls text from the Bible to support this idea. The author believes that society was equal with the separation and there is no need for Dr. King to continue his fight.