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"UZBEKISTAN"

Albany Movement Position Paper

Tuesday, July 17, 1962

The Albany Movement expresses the damages of segregation and outlines their requests for peaceful integration.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 7, 1967

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, writes Dr. King to invite him to a meeting with members of the British Parliament to discuss the developing racial crisis in their country. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from John M. Thornton to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

John M. Thorton invites Dr. King to speak at the Citizenship Award Banquet hosted by the National Capital Voters Association, in order to encourage the 425,000 Negro citizens of Washington, DC to vote in the upcoming presidential election.

Style

Dr. King references Voltaire and his views regarding the impact of the style in which one chooses to express himself.

Letter from D. G. Witt to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

D. G. Witt notifies Dr. King that Preferred Risk Mutual Insurance Company has reconsidered canceling Dr. King's automobile insurance. Due to the number of accidents Dr. King has had, continued coverage will require payment of a higher surcharge.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, September 10, 1965

Joan Daves notifies Dora McDonald that she is sending "two Japanese language copies of two titles". The titles were originally addressed to Dr. King via Joan's office.

Letter from Wilbur C. Davis to MLK

Tuesday, February 8, 1966

Wilbur C. Davis writes Dr. King seeking prayer for him and his family. Davis also includes a poem that he wrote regarding Dr. King's life and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Spirit

Dr. King records some thoughts on the meaning of "spirit."

3000 Jackson Negros Flay Headstart Cutoff

This article discusses the protest of African Americans to the ending of the Headstart nursey program, and the reallocation of those funds to other state programs.

Letter from William G. Broaddus to MLK

Wednesday, August 30, 1967

The Editor of the Dicta column from The Virginia Law Weekly writes Dr. King to request a contribution to their "Law for the Poor" series. Mr. Broaddus states that an ideal article will discuss landlord tenant problems and offer solutions. He tells Dr. King that his work in Chicago "on the landlord tenant problem...[makes you] well qualified to write on this subject."

Cover to Cover

Saturday, June 24, 1967

The Trentonian newspaper, under the subheading "Cover to Cover," published a brief review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community." This review examines Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" was Dr. King's first publication, since he received the Nobel Peace Prize. The book was published and released in 1967.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

Letter from MLK to J. Howard Edmondson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Oklahoma Senator James Howard Edmondson to express appreciation for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Black Power: Two Views

Saturday, October 1, 1966

James Peck, a white civil rights activist, writes an article concerning the path of the Civil Rights Movement. He is beginning to notice that black power and black racism are taking over organizations that had been focused on nonviolence and racial equality.

Memo to Members of the National Board of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

Friday, January 6, 1967

This letter from Richard W. Boone invites recipients to attend a workshop for the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

Draft Letter from MLK to Reverend Jackson

Dr. King replies to Rev. Jackson's letter of April 22. He apologizes for the delay and assures Rev. Jackson that he will send thank you messages to everyone listed in his initial letter. Dr. King also tells Rev. Jackson that he hopes their friendship has not been affected by recent circumstances.

New York Amsterdam News: White-On-White Darien's Open Door

Saturday, December 12, 1964

In this editorial Ms. Gertrude Wilson highlights a teacher exchange program in an affluent White community. This particular program aims to enrich the lives of students by integrating a diverse representation of professionals.

Notre Dame Law School Library Letter to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

Miss Boller, the law school library assistant of Notre Dame, inquires about a recent speech by Dr. King concerning his perspective on the United States and violence.

Letter from Sam Gasbarre to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967

Sam Gasbarre, identifying himself as a white American, writes Dr. King to support his opinion that the Vietnam War is evil and should end.

Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

Letter from Morris A. Morse to Rev. Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Morris Morse sends his condolences regarding the death of Dr. King. Mr. Morse further explains his opposition of the idea of building a two million dollar church in Dr. King's honor, because he believes that the reverend would not want such a memorial when so many people are in need.

Co-Op Movements for Black Economic Development

This memorandum sent to Dr. King by Professor St. Clair Drake, is a full proposal for the development/revival of the co-operative movements among negroes in large urban centers.

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Friday, July 19, 1963

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Norwegian Peace Initiative

Friday, January 6, 1967

Five Norwegians concerned about the Vietnam conflict propose that winners of the Nobel Peace Prize form a negotiating delegation to visit the US and Hanoi governments.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Goucher College

Friday, June 26, 1964

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's delight in knowing that Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Coucher College will include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on their school's reading list. She urges Dean Dorsey to purchase Dr. King's recent book "Why We Can't Wait," which contains the full text of the letter.

Telegram from Randolph Blackwell to Mr. M. H. Thomas

Friday, August 6, 1965

Randolph T. Blackwell sends a telegram to M. H. Thomas to permit the SCLC to honor requests for telephone installations made by Carole Hoover.

SCLC News Release on Voter Registration

Monday, February 19, 1962

This press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference describes Dr. King's prediction that many African-Americans would register to vote in the upcoming election. Dr. King also remarks that President Kennedy "has not lived up to his civil rights campaign promises."

Telegram from Dr. Roland Smith to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967

Dr. Roland Smith congratulates Dr. King on being honored with a Doctor of Divinity Degree from Morehouse College.

Rural Negros Start New Program

This press release from the SCLC informs the public that the self-help program of education for seasonal farm workers in Wilcox County, Alabama has officially opened. Along with the help of the federal office of Economic Opportunity, the SCLC wishes to create hope for neglected rural families. Also, to make this program a success, the antipoverty agency funded about $250 as well as a federal grant of $300 to help in financing this project.

Letter of Appreciation from MLK to Beverly A. Asbury

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

In this letter Dr. King expresses gratitude to Rev. Beverly Asbury for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He stresses the importance of supporters' contributions in order to successfully continue the initiative toward unity, justice, and equality.