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"UZBEKISTAN"

Letter from MLK to J. S. Beckington

Wednesday, June 15, 1966
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King thanks Mr. J. S. Beckington for his contribution to the SCLC. King also expresses how important the loyal supporters are to his organization.

Berkeley, George

Dr. King notes Berkeley's views on metaphysics.

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

Rochester Action for Welfare Rights

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is invited to make an appearance on behalf of the Rochester Action for Welfare Rights. They explain that they have also extended an invitation to Reverend Bernard Lafayette to attend the event.

Letter from MLK to Moreland Griffith Smith, Sr.

Tuesday, February 23, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee to the US Commission Civil Rights, in advance for advising him at the upcoming meeting. Dr. King states that he is sending Reverend Andrew Young to represent the SCLC.

Letter from Verinal Harris to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. Verinal Harris pleads for the help of Dr. King regarding the brutal actions of the police against children in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Memphis, TN

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Sin

Dr. King offers two possible interpretations of Psalms 53:1.

Letter from Student Mobilization Committee

New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM, San Francisco, CA

The Student Mobilization Committee petitions for help to protest the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Arthur Abba Goldberg to Dr. King about Conducting Seminars for SCLC

Friday, January 12, 1968
New Jersey (NJ)

Arthur Abba Goldberg, Deputy Attorney General for the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs and the Housing Finance Agency is sending a copy of his resume to Dr. King, and expresses his interest in conducting seminars in the field of housing or housing finance.

II Samuel Class Notes

Dr. King outlines the biblical Book of II Samuel by topic.

Telegram from Georgiana Hardy to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, August 7, 1963
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Georgiana Hardy, president of the Los Angeles City Board of Education, requests a meeting with Dr. King's upon his upcoming visit to California.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The SCLC issues a notice for more teachers to assist with their Citizenship Education Program. The training held at the Dorchester Center in McIntosh, Georgia, teaches potential instructors on how to educate community individuals about utilizing their basic first-class citizenship rights.

Letter from Alice McBee to MLK

Wednesday, September 7, 1966
New Jersey (NJ)

Alice McBee expresses her admiration for Dr. King and dedicates two of her poems to the King family.

MLK's Examination Book for Bible Course

Tuesday, December 3, 1946
EGYPT, GREECE

Dr. King writes six short essays for an examination in his Bible course.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Clarence Lundquist

Thursday, March 15, 1962

Dr. King writes to the administrator of wage hour and public contracts division for the U.S. Department of Labor, Clarence Lundquist. In this telegram, Dr. King requests that Lundquist investigate a violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act at Seapak Shrimp Factories. It is here that African Americans were told to sign statements that said they were handicapped. If the forms were signed the African American workers received significantly lower wages than before.

Letter from MLK to Adolph Held

Friday, September 29, 1967
New York, NY, Chicago, IL, ISRAEL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King writes Adolph Held, President of the Jewish Labor Committee, in response to his inquiry regarding SCLC's position on anti-semitism. Dr. King clarifies a number of distortions produced by the media, and presents the facts of the Chicago Conference of New Politics event throughout the letter.

B.F. Randolph

South Carolina (SC)

B.F. Randolph, African American preacher and member of the South Carolina Legislature, is honored in this statement for his work against racial discrimination. The documents states that Mr. Randolph fought for the words 'irrespective of race and color,' to be included in the Bill of Rights.

Letter from Lawrence Caesar to Andrew Young

Saturday, March 11, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Lawrence A. Caesar writes Andrew Young with concerns about charges against Dr. King having appeared in a "Training School for Communists." He states that he simply wants information to refute these charges in order to prevent any negative impact against the movement.

Letter from MLK to Rev. W.W. Finlator about Preaching Invitation

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King offers deep regrets to Rev. Finlator for his inability to accept an invitation to preach at The Pullen Memorial Baptist Church.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Vincent

Wednesday, November 23, 1966
Chicago, IL

Dr. King expresses his gratitude, to Mrs. Vincent and the Millinery Workers Union, for their support and hard work towards the SCLC.

The Other America

Sunday, March 10, 1968
VIETNAM

Dr. King delivered this speech, "The Other America," for the Local 1199 Salute to Freedom program. The speech emphasized the need to address poverty, the Vietnam War, and race relations in America.

Letter from Patricia Reid to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Patricia Reid has mixed feelings about Dr. King and the position he has taken. Even though she and her husband agree with this stance on civil rights, they respectfully disagree on his position on the Vietnam War. The Reids believe that Dr. King shouldn't interfere with foreign policy unless he can come up with a viable solution to end the Vietnam War. However, they still feel compelled to contribute to the work of the SCLC, but warn Dr. King that other individuals may not be that sympathetic.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965
Chattanooga, TN, Baltimore, MD

Mr. Jones, on behalf of the Council for Co-operative Action, invites Dr. King to speak at their function in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Telegram from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Wednesday, July 7, 1965
Chicago, IL

Talk show host and columnist Irv Kupcinet invites Dr. King to make an appearance on his television panel. Mr. Kupcinet discloses knowledge of Dr. King's visit to Chicago for an announcement on July 24, 1965, and encourages the civil rights leader to appear on the show later that afternoon.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Linda Brown

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student expresses condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from Maj Palmberg to MLK

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
FINLAND, Chicago, IL, Stockholm, Sweden, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Maj Palmberg, Cultural Secretary of Abo Akademi University in Finland, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak to Turku students during his upcoming visit to the region.

New York Times: US Judge Forbids A House Inquiry; Panel is Defiant

Tuesday, August 16, 1966
VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This article discusses the decision of a federal judge, ordering the House Committes of Un-American Activities to not hold a hearing on a bill that would make it illegal for Americans to aid the Vietcong.

Sin

Dr. King outlines some insights regarding moral duty and sin.

The Strength of the Legacy

Sunday, November 22, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL)

In this New York Herald Tribune article, Dr. King refers to the recent 1964 Presidential election as a decisive repudiation of segregation and extremism. He claims the election results honored the memory of President John F. Kennedy, assassinated a year earlier. Kennedy’s greatest contribution to human rights, King says, was his televised appeal to the American people on June 19, 1963 describing equal rights and equal opportunity as a moral issue as old as the scriptures and as clear as the Constitution.