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"United States White House"

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Tuesday, September 15, 1964

Benjamin Spock, Co-Chairman for the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy, solicits Dr. King as a sponsor for a testimonial dinner. The committee will honor Max Youngstein with its Eleanor Roosevelt Peace Award at the dinner.

Centennial Edition of The Nation

Wednesday, February 17, 1965

James J. Storrow, Jr., Publisher of The Nation, invites Dr. King to advertise in its 100th anniversary edition. Storrow suggests that Dr. King could write an article on SCLC's achievements and services to the community within the advertisement.

Community of Glenville, City of Cleveland,

This 1965 brochure from the Office of the City Planning Commission, Cleveland, OH, focuses on the "almost all-Negro community" of Glenville. In it the Commission discusses both its ability to assist the community and the responsibility of the community to engage in grass roots activities that would serve as a springboard for larger scale urban renewal. The overall message of the brochure is that for the City to provide assistance, the community will have to "begin at home".

Letter from Debbie Steiner to MLK

Sunday, May 17, 1964

Debbie Steiner of Willburn, New Jersey tells Dr. King how she was moved by his article in Life magazine, which she calls "a realistic summary of why the Negro can not wait." She explains her discontent with prejudice and inquires about how young people can influence change.

Letter from Philip M. Weightman to MLK

Friday, January 3, 1964

Philip Weightman invites Dr. King to attend the AFL-CIO Committee on Political Education's conference at the Dinkler Plaza Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia. Weightman also briefly explains what will be discussed at the conference.

Ebenezer Baptist Church Courtesy Guild Fifth Anniversary

Sunday, February 14, 1965

This document is a cover page for the program of the Ebenezer Baptist Church Courtesy Guild Fifth Anniversary. Included is a listing of Guild Officers and Ministers.

Letter from A3C Johnson to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965

Mr. Johnson writes to Dr. King requesting a recommendation letter for reclassification. Johnson explains that he is highly affiliated and a notable person must write his recommendation.

Letter from MLK to Senator Henry M. Jackson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Senator Henry M. Jackson expressing gratitude for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett, Dorothy M. Steere, and George C. Hardin

The Religious Society of Friends, which consists of 17,000 Quakers, decides to send its members to spread a message of "love and goodwill" to both whites and Negroes of Philadelphia.

Food and Population Crisis Committee

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

Dr. David Lubbock and Dr. Jo Alter describe the economic conditions in New Delhi, India. The document lists the operations, communications, medical assistance, food and other things needed to provide relief to the population involved in the crisis.

Erasmus

Dr. King writes about Erasmus, a Dutch scholar, who lived during the Reformation period.

Letter from Patricia M. Shillingburg to Walter Fauntroy

Tuesday, January 16, 1968

Patricia M. Shillingburg requests payments that she has yet to recieve upon her release from the SCLC during her assistance with the Harry Belafonte Concert. After making numerous attempts to discover the reason of her release and location of her funds, Ms. Shillingburg informs Rev. Walter Fauntroy that she will take alternative appropriate steps to secure the payment of her services.

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

Letter to MLK from Stewart Meacham

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Stewart Meacham writes Dr. King about his availability to attend a conference hosted by the American Friends Service Committee at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He mentions the theme of the ocnference, other invited guests, and that the orgranization is prepared to cover Dr. King's travel and housing expenses.

Letter from Mrs. Flossie Dedmond to MLK

Monday, July 6, 1964

A representative of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority invites Dr. King to speak at the Public Meeting of the Forty-first National Convention held in Philadelphia, PA. For publicity purposes she requests several glossy photographs for distribution.

Letter from Paul P. Martin to MLK

Monday, March 26, 1962

The Erie Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to be the principal speaker at its Freedom Rally.

Letter from MLK to Burke Marshall of the US Justice Department

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, expressing gratitude for Marshall's leadership in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through both houses of Congress.

The Shaking Off of Burdens

Thursday, August 19, 1965

Professor Robert Birley delivers an annual memorial lecture on T.B. Davie at the University of Cape Town, South Africa. He notes that Mr. Davie served as vice-chancellor for the college and is most noted for his adherence to the principles of academic freedom and his stand against apartheid. Birley believes that this annual memorial is absolutely necessary to maintain Davie's inspirational legacy and continue the fight for academic freedom . He brings up the politics of slaves versus the free, drawing on the philosophies of Aristotle, Plato, and others to describe examples.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

Religious Education

Dr. King discusses the topic of religious education. King asserts that religious education should not become a substitute for personal evangelism and that "religious instruction without conversion is comparatively ineffective."

Immortality

Dr. King quotes philosopher John Fiske regarding the topic of immortality.

Resource Teachers

This document lists the eight duties of Resource Teachers, and includes targeted instruction for how this group should interact with base teachers and students.

Letter from the National Union of South African Students to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

On behalf of the National Union of South African Students at the University of Cape Town and the University Van Kaapstad, Martin West requests Dr. King's contribution concerning race relations to the Nusas Journal. The scholarly journal is the "only real national" organ available to students regardless of "race, religion, or colour" in apartheid South Africa.

Letter from Norman Walsh to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

Norman Walsh thanks Dr. King for being a spokesperson for Vietnam, poverty, and civil rights.

Letter from Dorothy O. Bucklin to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963

Mrs. Bucklin invites Dr. King to deliver a series of sermons highlighting his biblical preference and his experiences with the SCLC. The conference will host affiliates of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

This letter serves to inform Dr.King of the offers being made from a Japanese publisher, to purchase the rights to "Strength to Love."

Letter from Kenyan Student to MLK

Monday, March 5, 1962

A student writes Dr. King expressing support for his movement and social views in regards to Civil Rights.

Letter from MLK to Sarah Harvey

Tuesday, November 28, 1961

Dr. King thanks Miss Harvey of Oxford, England for her contribution to his cause. He suggests that she inquire about any regulations governing money coming from England to the US. He also expresses his hope to meet her in his travels.

The Concordia Lutheran: First Quarter 1968

The Concordia Lutheran Conference distributed a newsletter to aid fellow Lutherans. The purpose was to provide various Bible verses and teachings that could be applied to the reader's life.

Mt. Zion Baptist Church Third Annual Lecture Series

Friday, November 10, 1961

The Mount Zion Baptist Church presents Dr. King as the key note speaker for their Third Annual Lecture Series. The lecture series will provide the community with a conscientious perspective of the societal issues as recognized by Dr. King. Furthermore, this event will bring aid to the Building Program of Mount Zion.