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"United States White House"

Letter from MLK to Senator Daniel Brewster

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King commends Senator Daniel Brewster for his support of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

Letter to Dorothy Height from Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Dora McDonald apologizes to Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, for not responding sooner to let her know that Dr. and Mrs. King would be unable to attend the Premier Life Membership Dinner. The invitation to the dinner came during Dr. King's sabbatical to write a new book.

Should F.E.P.C. Become a Federal Law?

In this draft article Dr. King discusses employment discrimination and the need for the Fair Employment Practices Commission to become legislation.

Alabama SCLC July 1966 Report

Thursday, July 21, 1966

Albert Turner of the Alabama SCLC delivers a report on upcoming and continuing programs of the local SCLC. Some of the programs include political action and a SCLC convention.

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.

MLK's Index Card Referencing Bertrand Russell

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Bertrand Russell's views on man.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Letter from Dan H. Elkind to MLK

Tuesday, August 22, 1967

Mr. Elkind discusses recent actions of the SNCC and the SCLC's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign. He believes that the actions made by the SNCC will lead to violence and also "alienate" supporters of civil rights legislation. He views Dr. King's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign to be unlawful, and therefore suggests a different approach for Dr. King to take.


Dr. King discusses the weakness of "non theistic humanism."

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

Letter from Betty White to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Betty White, president of The Young Matrons of True Light Baptist Church, invites Mrs. King to be a guest speaker and soloist at an upcoming civil rights program.


Dr. King clarifies the meaning of repentance according to the Old Testament.

Invitation from J.G. Kennelly to MLK

Wednesday, April 24, 1963

J.G. Kennelly invites Dr. King to address the Christian Culture Forum during their 1963-1964 season in Hamilton, Canada.

Today's Hero - The Negro Child

The "Southern Patriot" newsletter of the Southern Conference Educational Fund published this advertisement featuring the photo of two small children. The advertisement includes a heartfelt thank you to those many Negro students (trailblazers) brave enough to endure racial harassment and physical danger in the struggle to integrate schools in the South.

Letter from Edmund Gordon to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Edmund W. Gordon expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's agreement to use his name in connection with the development of a Memorial Park honoring W.E.B Dubois. Mr. Gordon also informs Dr. King of the other participants of the project along with a brief description of his professional background.

Mr. & Mrs. John Wesley Dobbs Sends Best Wishes for 1960

This card reflects the various dates in which progress has been made in the struggle for equal rights for all. In this card Mr. & Mrs. John Wesley Dobbs also gives their best wishes for 1960.

SCLC Newsletter: August 1963

Thursday, August 1, 1963

This is volume one of the SCLC Newsletter, printed for the month and year of August 1963. Several topics are covered including; the March on Washington, Rebuilding Bombed Churches, the WCLC, and Negro voting registration.

People to People: Is Non-Violence Doomed to Failure?

Saturday, February 12, 1966

Dr. King shares his view on the criticism that the nonviolent philosophy in America is disintegrating. Reviewing the historical success of nonviolence, he contends that the "unselfish" element of the movement is what has ensured its victory for all races in the past, and will continue to spur it to victory in the future. He surmises that proponents of nonviolence "shall be able, not only to remove injustice, but to establish in its place freedom and social peace for all Americans."

Letter with Enclosed Copy of Minutes of the SCLC Board Meeting

Wednesday, August 23, 1967

Mr. Eskridge sends a copy of the minutes for the SCLC Board Meeting to Secretary Dora McDonald. During the meeting, Andrew Young and Ralph David Abernathy address the twenty-eight board members of the organization at the Regency House in Atlanta, GA.

TV: Return of Susskind

Monday, October 3, 1966

This article reviews a series of television shows that aired on various networks dealing with politics and race relations. Among the programs mentioned is a segment featuring Senator Kennedy as well as a documentary entitled "The Agony of Two Cities" centered on segregation.

SCLC Strategy North/South

This document addresses indifference of the Northern and Southern movement contributions. The direct-action techniques that are exercised in the South do not exist in the North. The SCLC is in need of a fundamental and effective political action in the North. The primary focus is to lay political foundations for the basic social and economic reforms throughout the nation.

Judgement or Justice

Dr. King quotes a book entitled "Sea Dreams," by Alfred Lord Tennyson, regarding judgement and justice.

Civil Rights Symposium Program

Thursday, April 8, 1965

This document is a program from a symposium workshop on national and local civil rights challenges.

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

Letter from Mrs. Elsie Walker to the SCLF

Monday, April 15, 1968

In this letter, Mrs. Elsie Walker mentions the enclosure of $50 given in memory of Dr. King. She also commits her Church's Service Guild to making annual pilgrimages to Dr. King's burial site in order to pay homage to "our Leader."


Citing two sources concerning war, Dr. King notes the opinions of Dr. Charles W. Mayo and John M. Fletcher. Dr. Mayo believes that it is impossible to abolish war, as "war is part of our human inheritance," while Fletcher takes the opposite view in his book "Human Nature and World Peace."

Letter from Morehouse College to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967

Tobe Johnson asks Dr. King and other members of the Morehouse College Board of Trustees to fill out a questionnaire in preparation for re-accreditation by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.


Dr. King highlights a definition of sin according to Reinhold Niebuhr.

Letter from Mary Ann Quilter to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Ms. Quilter informs Dr. King of a political event taking place on campus and asks him for any campaign literature he can provide and a picture of himself.

"Negro Rights: Key Dates"

This image depicts the chronological history of laws passed as it pertains to the life and wellbeing of Negros. The first date of reference is January 1st, 1863, the day when slavery was abolished.