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"United States. Congress"

Letter to Jesse Jackson from Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 30, 1966
Chicago, IL, New York, NY

Dr. King request the attendance of Rev. Jesse Jackson at a meeting that will discuss the distribution of grant funds for a program regarding nonviolence and social change.

Letter from D. G. Amaron to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964
Washington, D.C., CANADA

The National Newspaper Awards of the Toronto Men's Press Club requests Dr. King as the keynote speaker for their dinner honors.

Gods Existence

Abstract: Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967
New York, NY, CHINA, Geneva, Switzerland, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, GUATEMALA, PERU, MEXICO

"Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam" is a sermon Dr. King delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967 in Atlanta. In this draft of the sermon, Dr. King references a previous speech, "Beyond Vietnam," that he delivered to the group "Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam" at Riverside Baptist Church in New York City.

Letter from Anthony Thompson to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968
Kansas (KS)

Anthony Thompson, of Bethany College in Kansas, requests that Dr. King send information concerning his political and world views. Thompson intends to include the information in a program called Choice '68 on campus.

Letter from The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge to MLK

Friday, February 17, 1967
Wisconsin (WI), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

A member of The Most Worshipful Mount Olive Grand Lodge in Milwaukee informs Dr. King of his study on the Negro voter. The study determined that Mississippi has the most non-registered Negro voters.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC)

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Letter from MLK to G. Lawrence Jones

Monday, December 23, 1963
LIBERIA

Dr. King writes G. Lawrence Jones distressed that Jones doesn't have the funds to pursue higher education. King states, "Our troubled world needs very much for young men with the courage and foresight you display to receive every chance to develop your full potential."

An Appreciation Dinner

Monday, December 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA

This dinner salutes the outstanding service of the SCLC staff. It includes menu items for the gathering as well as a schedule of guest speakers and attendees.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Uvee Mdonana-Arbouin

Thursday, August 15, 1963
New York (NY)

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald expresses appreciation for the poem of Mrs. Uvee Mdonana-Arbouin of the Progressive National Baptist Convention in New York. She encloses fifty copies of one of Dr. King's letters as Mrs. Mdonana-Arbouin requested.

Mastering Ourselves

"Mastering Ourselves" is Dr. King's exploration of the inner struggle for good and evil that occurs within every human's experience. Dr. King asserts that this "dualism" can sometimes cause good people to do bad things and bad people to do good things. According to Dr. King, this can only be overcome through identifying and replacing one's own weaknesses. He also suggests finding a profitable way to use leisure time coupled with a devotional life and continuous prayer.

Letter from Robert Lee King to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

A member of Ebenezer Baptist Church expresses concern over Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham Jail. Robert Lee King also shares his wish that he could physically be in jail as well to aid in the "freedom of all Americans." Though nothing in the letter has been blocked out, the letter does contain a stamp of the word "censored."

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Monday, December 4, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Selma, AL, Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

Letter from Milton R. Young to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Republican North Dakota Senator Milton Young thanks Dr. King for a recent telegram expressing his views on pending voting rights legislation.

Citizenship Education Proposal

South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ, Montgomery, AL

SCLC's Citizenship Education Program issues a five year proposal for the period between 1965 and 1970. The proposal outlines previous successful activities since the inception of the program.

Letter from John Conyers to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA

John Conyers, Congressman-Elect for the first district of Michigan, writes Dr. King seeking advice and endorsement for his campaign.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom News Release

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

The National Urban League expresses it's gratitude for being apart of the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Whitney Young expresses the importance of Americans continuing their fight for equality through the proper necessary legislation.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul Kurtz

Friday, January 5, 1968
New York (NY)

Dora McDonald grants Kurtz permission to print Dr. King's unedited speech "as is," as long as Kurtz indicates on the speech that is taken from a tape and is un-edited.

Resurrection (Barth's View)

Dr. King quotes a passage from Hugh Mackintosh's "Types of Modern Theology" concerning Barth's views on resurrection.

Ossie Davis Defines Blackness and Whiteness

In this document,Ossie Davis uses Roget's Thesaurus and defines the words "whiteness" and "blackness" only to find many positive outcomes for whiteness and an abundance of negative synonyms for blackness.

Food and Population Crisis Committee

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
New York, NY, INDIA, New Delhi, India, ISRAEL

Dr. David Lubbock and Dr. Jo Alter describe the economic conditions in New Delhi, India. The document lists the operations, communications, medical assistance, food and other things needed to provide relief to the population involved in the crisis.

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

Tuesday, June 21, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.

Letter from Michael Bennett to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964
Ohio (OH)

In this letter, Mr.Michael Bennett expresses how delighted the NAACP is knowing Dr. King will lecture on Kent State University's campus.

Letter from Edward Thacker to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Arkansas (AR), Hot Springs, AR, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Edward Thacker, former State Commander of the Veterans of Foreign Wars for Arkansas, expresses his disagreement with Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War. Thacker also contends that the eradication of poverty is an unrealistic goal.

Letter from Carl A. Auerbach to MLK

Monday, December 6, 1965
Minnesota (MN)

Carl A. Auerbach has declined to make contributions to the S.C.L.C based on the assumption that Dr. King will use the funds for protest movements "against the American policy in Vietnam."

Man The Christian View

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr’s three ways in which the Christian view of man differs from all others, citing “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1959
Johannesburg, South Africa, South Africa, New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

The Lonesome Road

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA)

Stanley D. Levison sends Dr. King an article from The Washington Post titled "The Lonesome Road," which is a review of Dr. Kings book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Martin Duberman, the author of the article, explains Dr. King's reasons for writing the book, and Duberman also provides a favorable review of the publication.

What is The OIC Institute?

Philadelphia, PA

The Opportunities Industrialization Center (OIC) Institute was founded in 1964 by Reverend Leon H. Sullivan in response to public demand for a centralized resource for economic and social progress. This brochure outlines the program's history, principles, and current executive leaders.

Letter from Mildred Hood to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mildred Hood explains to Dr. King what she and her daughter experienced at the Cook County Hospital in Chicago. Hood wants to know what she can do about the situation.