The Archive

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"United States. Congress"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. James Halsey

Wednesday, March 20, 1963

Dora McDonald sends, at Dr. King's request, a check to Dr. James Halsey.

Letter from Barry Diamond to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Barry Diamond, Chairman of Choice 68 at the University of Florida, informs Dr. King that his name will be on the ballot and invites him to speak at the University. Diamond explains that Choice 68 is "a national collegiate presidential primary sponsored by Time Magazine."

Letter from Herschel Auerbach to MLK

Friday, October 13, 1967

Mr. Auerbach objects to "anti-Semitic and anti-Israel" resolutions adopted at the National Conference of New Politics, at which King was a keynote speaker.

Ebenezer Baptist Church

This picture depicts Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Dr. King pastored.

Letter from the Chester, Pennsylvania Branch of the NAACP to MLK

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

The Chester Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to attend its celebration of the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation. The organizers ask for information about the process to arrange the visit and for a picture to be enclosed with Dr. King's reply.

Letter from Harry Denman to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Mr.Denman writes Dr. King to share words of support and encouragement as Dr. King prepares to turn himself over to the Birmingham officials. Denman suggests that Dr.King should turn this event into a major demonstration.

Letter from Mrs. Frank Summers to SCLC

Monday, April 9, 1962

Mrs. Frank Summers sends contribution to SCLC and wishes to pass on the March SCLC Newsletter.

Letter from Robert Bialek to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Dr. King informs Mr. Bialek of a creative arts festival named "The Artists of Conscience." Local artists who are not in favor of the administrative policy in Vietnam initiated the festival. Mr. Bialek also requests that Dr. King send him a list of Negro artists who may be interested in participating in the festival.

News Article about MLK's Church and Atlanta Housing Project

In this article, the author highlights Dr. King's involvement with a recent urban housing redevelopment project. The author states that the Ebenezer Baptist Church will commit full sponsorship; he later discusses the various plans in more detail and the purpose to community it will serve.

Letter of Appreciation to MLK from Mrs. A.M.Digilio

Friday, July 30, 1965

In this letter, Mrs. A.M. Digilio writes to Dr. King. Along with her expressions of appreciation, she admits to being one of the millions of whites who have "prayerfully" followed Dr. King's work. Mrs. Digilio states that Dr. King has been a voice to those of the "inarticulate working class", both white and black. She speaks of the unfortunate decline of morality amongst Americans and the necessary Christian might to rectify it. Mrs. Digilio further compares Dr.


Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking’s “The Meaning of God in Human Experience.”

Letter from Joseph F. McCrindle to SCLC

Wednesday, December 28, 1966

Joseph F. McCrindle, President of the Henfield Foundation, encloses a check of $250.00 to SCLC on behalf of the Henfield Foundation.

Letter from Josephine Davis to Dr. King

Friday, June 24, 1966

In this letter, Josephine Davis tells Dr. King that they enjoyed the evening he spent with them. She then informs him that their prayers are with him and that he can look forward to financial help from "THOSE".

Letter to Lucille Withers from MLK's Secretary

Monday, December 3, 1962

Miss Lucille Withers, of Harper and Row Publishing, was the addressee of this correspondence from Miss Dora McDonald. Miss McDonald informed Miss Withers that she enclosed Dr. King's sermon titled "Transformed Nonconformist." The sermon was apart of a compilation of other sermons given by Dr. King, which were formed into his second book "Strength to Love."

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Elias About Civil Rights March

In this correspondence, Dr. King thanks Mr. Elias for a previously sent letter. He goes on to mention that the Southern Christian Leadership Conference is presently organizing in Chicago, with the goal of eventually launching a major campaign.

Letter from Harry Walker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Harry Walker summarizes a recent conversation he held with Dora McDonald, Mrs. Tobye Karl, and Particia Hederman that outlined the dates of future speaking engagements for Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to J. Frank Patch

Friday, May 13, 1966

Dr. King declines to accept J. Frank Patch's invitation to attend the conference sponsored by the Baptist Union of Western Canada due to prior commitments in the United States.

Letter from the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Bolennart Andersson, President of the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden, sends a congratulatory letter and an invitation to Dr. King to speak to their student union.

Letter from Rabbi Joel S. Goor to MLK

Tuesday, July 28, 1964

Rabbi Joel Goor extends his appreciation to Dr. King for being able to participate in SCLC's 1964 desegregation campaign in St. Augustine, Florida. He feels that his involvement in the civil rights movement spirtitually enhances his role as an active religious leader. Rabbi Goor encloses a donation to the SCLC for assisting with his bail while being jailed in St. Augustine and a copy of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King to autograph.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Edward Greaves

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Miss Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Edward Greaves that additional copies of Dr. King's sermon entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians" are unavailable. She refers Mrs. Greaves to locate the sermon in Dr. King's newly released book "Strength to Love."

Letter from James Shaffer and James Barfield

Friday, July 29, 1966

Mr. Shaffer and Mr. Barfield both thank Dr. King and the SCLC for thier works for humanity.

Letter from National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

The National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower informs Dr. King of the tremendous strides made by the African American community during the elections in Sunflower County, Mississippi. Four years prior, the loss of elections by black candidates was attributed to local intimidation, but new organizational tactics provided the group with tools to combat this issue. The success of the election set a precedent for many other Mississippi counties to view voting rights as a means to change citizens' lives and the nature of the state.

Anonymous Letter on Chicago Slums

Thursday, February 10, 1966

A disgusted city taxpayer from Chicago writes to Dr. King regarding the condition of slums in Chicago. It is believed that Dr. King and other leaders should stop wasting time on marches and teach young Negroes religion.

The Mastery of Fear

This outline explains the direction of Dr. King's sermon entitled "The Mastery of Fear." In it, Dr. King explores the challenges and necessity of confronting fear.

Statement from MLK Regarding the Death of Malcolm X

Sunday, February 21, 1965

Dr. King comments on the assassination of civil rights activist Malcolm X.

Letter to Mrs. King from Patricia Pleas

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter of condolence originates from East Orange, NJ, and is addressed to Mrs. King. The letter was written the day, following Dr. King's assassination, and its receipt stamp date would suggest the vast volume of mail, in the aftermath of his death.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Letter from MLK to Otis Warren

Thursday, July 22, 1965

Dr. King acknowledges the contribution made by Otis Warren of Baltimore, Maryland to the SCLC. He highlights new initiatives that the SCLC will undertake to boost Negro political participation in Southern states and a project to tackle the ghettos of Northern cities. Dr. King humbly notes that these projects could not move forward without the generosity of individuals like Warren.

Letter From Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson wrote this note to Dr. King to respectfully decline his invitation to a luncheon and to serve on the board of directors of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He states he enjoyed their last meeting and is looking forward to the next one.

Revolution In The Classroom

Friday, March 31, 1967

Dr. King addresses the Georgia Teachers and Education Association about the education of children in the South.