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"United States. Congress"

Christianity

Dr. King finds agreement with Celsus, an opponent of Christianity, in a quote on the root of the Christian faith.

Restorationism

Dr. King defines restorationism.

Letter from Eileen Coyne to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Second grader Eileen Coyne sends condolences to the King family. She and her classmates were instructed to write letters to Mrs. King to express their feelings following Dr. King's assassination. This document is a part of a collection of sixteen letters from this Bronx, New York classroom.

10th Anniversary SCLC Convention Program

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This document contains a program for the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention hosted by Rev. Howard Creecy, President of the Atlanta Affiliate Chapter of the SCLC. The theme of the convention is "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from William H. Chester to MLK

Friday, September 6, 1963
San Francisco, CA, SOUTH AFRICA, California (CA)

William H. Chester writes Dr. King enclosing a donation to the SCLC from Mary Louise Hooper, chairman of the Northern California Committee on African Affairs, on behalf of the San Francisco Church-Labor Conference. The organization conducted a Human Rights Day parade that was broadcast in Africa. Mr. Chester further informs Dr. King that Mrs. Hooper encourages the SCLC to "keep moving forward until victory is achieved."

Sin

Dr. King paraphrases a scripture from the book of Leviticus that pertains to sin.

Man (His Split Personality)

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

Letter from Dora McDonald to Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine

Tuesday, February 18, 1964
New York, NY, Alabama (AL)

Dora McDonald inquires about receiving additional copies of the Time Magazine issue that featured Dr. King as the Man of the Year. She informs Otto Fuerbringer that Mrs. King's relatives in her hometown of Marion, Alabama were unable to buy copies of the magazine.

Letter of White Opposition to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

A gentleman by the name of David writes to Dr. King expressing his belief that segregation is the "best way to avoid dating, dancing, sex and marriage" between Negroes and whites.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Monday, April 8, 1963
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Audrey Mizer

Friday, December 29, 1961
Ohio (OH), CHINA

Dr. King addresses Audrey Mizer's concerns regarding his position on "admitting Red China to the United Nations." He explains that he realizes the sensitivity of this topic but feels that the issue must be tackled in a realistic manner.

Letter from University of King's College to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

The University of King's College sends a follow up letter to Dr. King inquiring if he will accept their offer to receive an Honorary Doctorate of Civil Law.

John Scotus Eriugena

Dr. King quotes philosopher John Scotus Eriugena.

Letter from Margaret & Richard Dodge to MLK

Sunday, March 21, 1965

Margaret and Richard Dodge inform Dr. King of a successful fundraiser they hosted and enclose the profits to help Dr. King in the civil rights movement.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman's "Philosophy of Religion."

Letter from Harry Fleischman to MLK

Tuesday, December 27, 1966
New York, NY, Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, SPAIN, Atlanta, GA

Harry Fleischman suggests a text that may be of interest to Dr. King, entitled "We Are Not Summer Patriots." The text highlights anti-Semitism and other efforts to attain equality.

Appreciation Letter from MLK to Maitland Griggs

Thursday, January 10, 1963
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Maitland Griggs contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Negro Church Finest Hope for Christianity

Thursday, January 18, 1962
London, England, Pittsburgh, PA

Ruth Haefner forwards a publication from The Pittsburgh Courier which states, "the newly militant Negro theologians in America, may perform the miracle of raising the dead (Western Christendom) to life." She further expresses her hopes that Dr. King may do the work of reviving the Christian spirit with a weekly letter featured in London press.

Letter from Dorothy L. Shereff to MLK Regarding a Book on Gandhi

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dorothy Shereff, Rights and Permissions Manager for The New American Library, requests that Dr. King send a statement to promote Professor Louis Fischer's book on Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK about an Invitation

Wednesday, July 20, 1966
Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

In this letter, Mr. Hubert Humphrey, Vice President of the United States, writes to Dr. King declining his invitation to address the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Bloody Sunday

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King recollects events that occurred on "Bloody Sunday" in Selma, Alabama as 525 blacks marching were tear-gassed, clubbed, and beaten by police officers and discusses how television helped the Civil Rights Movement. King asserts that the television helps us all be participants in vital matters and it adds trust and validity to the movement.

Boston Sunday Herald: Martin King Discusses. . .

Sunday, May 7, 1967
VIETNAM, Boston, MA, Chicago, IL, New Jersey (NJ), Cleveland, OH, Louisville, KY, New York, NY

In Boston Sunday Herald article, Dr. King shares his views on mayoral candidate Mrs. Louise Day Hicks, Senator Edward Brooke, and the President's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King is adamant enough on the latter issue that he remarks he may change his policy regarding neutrality in elections.

Paul's Letter to American Christians Notes

These notes are in reference to a sermon given by Dr. King. The sermon, "Paul's Letter to American Christians," was included in the publishing of Dr. King's second book. Following the popularity of his first narrative, "Stride Toward Freedom," Dr. King was asked to compile some of his sermons into a book entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from Diane Szymkowski to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Diane Szymkowski of Villa Maria College in Buffalo, New York, writes Dr. King requesting campaign materials such as posters and buttons. She expresses their desire to conduct a campaign for the students illustrating multiple candidates.

Letter from C. Summer Stone Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, October 5, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Chuck Stone, assistant to New York Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, follows up with Dr. King about a telephone conversation between Powell and Dr. King. The discussion centered on Dr. King preaching at Abyssinian for the anniversary service. Stone reiterates Powell's hopes that Dr. King will be able to participate.

MLK Note

New York (NY)

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

Letter from Gerhard Ruoff to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
GERMANY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA

Gerhard Ruoff inquires about Dr. King and his nonviolent philosophy. Ruoff desires to know how King will respond if violence faces him.

Worship

Dr. King discusses the topic of religion and asserts, "religion is a binding force."

Black Power

In the article, Dr. King address the emerging Black Power movement. He feels that this movement will only promote Black extremism and supremacy which would be following in the steps of the White oppressor. Dr. King believes that the tactic of nonviolence is the only way to move through civil injustice and that everyone must collectively work together to achieve the common goal.

American Negro in the Field of Industrial Relations

This survey is an enclosure of a letter from Alfred L.J. Gunn to Dr. King. Entitled "The Negro in Personnel and Industrial Relations," the survey was conducted using interviews with American people involved in Industrial Relations. Through asking a series of questions to sixty participants, it is concluded that "the future of the American Negro in the field of Industrial Relations is expanding greatly."